Jewish Submitted Surnames

These names are used by Jews. For more specific lists, see Hebrew names and Yiddish names. See also about Jewish names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
RABINOVITCH Yiddish
Variant transcription of Rabinovich.
RABINOWICZ Jewish
Polish Jewish name meaning son of rabbi from the root rabi meaning "rabbi" combined with the Polish patronymic suffix -owicz "son of"
RABINOWITZ Jewish, Polish
Polish variant of Rabinovich.
RABINSKY Jewish
From the root rabi "rabbi" combined with the Polish suffix -ski
RACHLYN Jewish (Rare), Polish (Rare), Brazilian (Rare)
Rachlyn is a Jewish surname derived directly from polish "Rachman". This surname is very rare and apparently only few members in Brazil, descendants of Polish survivors of Holocaust.... [more]
RACHMAN Ukrainian, Jewish
Rachman is an old Jewish name which means "Merciful" in Hebrew.... [more]
RACHVALSKY Jewish
No history
RAK Polish, Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, Hungarian, Jewish
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, Hungarian (Rák), and Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from Slavic rak ‘crab’, ‘lobster’, or ‘crayfish’. This was applied as an occupational name for someone who caught and sold crayfish, crabs, or lobsters, or as a nickname to someone thought to resemble such a creature... [more]
RATHER German, Jewish
1. Occupational name for a counsellor or nickname for a wise person, from Middle High German rater ‘adviser’. ... [more]
RAVID Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Ravid, means "ornament, necklace" in Hebrew.
RAVIV Hebrew
From Hebrew רָבִיב (raviv) meaning "droplet, rain, drizzle".
RAZ Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Raz, means "secret" in Hebrew.
RECHT German, Jewish
Nickname for an upright person, from Middle High German reht, German recht "straight". As a Jewish name it is mainly of ornamental origin.
REGEV Hebrew
Means "clod of earth" in Hebrew.
REICH German, Jewish
Nickname for a wealthy or powerful man, from Middle High German rīch "of noble descent, powerful, rich", German reich "rich".
REISE German, Jewish
German (Westphalia) topographic name, from Middle Low German ris, res ‘swamp’. ... [more]
REISNER Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) nickname for a traveler, from an agent derivative of German reisen ‘to travel’ (see Reise). Also a variant of Reis.
REISS German, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of Reis or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename Ris, rendered as Reis and Reiss.... [more]
RESHEF Hebrew
From the given name Resheph.
REVERE English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
REYTBLAT Yiddish
Means "red leaf" in Yiddish. This is somewhat rare, chiefly used by Jews from Russia and Ukraine.
REZNIKOV Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Jewish occupational name for a ritual slaughterer, derived from Yiddish reznik (of Slavic origin).
RIFKIN Jewish
Metronymic from the Yiddish female given name Rifke from the Hebrew given name Rivka (see Rebecca), with the addition of the Slavic suffix -in.
RIFKIND Jewish
Variant of RIFKIN. The final element was changed due to the influence of the Yiddish noun kind "child" (German: "Kinder").
RIVES French, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name Rive a back-formation from Rivke (see Rifkin).... [more]
ROCHMAN Jewish
Metronymic from the Yiddish given name RUCHEL + suffix man "man".
ROCKMAN German, Jewish
Possibly an altered spelling of ROCHMAN.
ROGIN Jewish
Habitational name from any of various villages named Rogi or from Rogin, all in Belarus.
ROHR German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area thickly grown with reeds, from Middle High German ror. Also a habitational name from one of the several places named with this word.
ROMANOFF Russian, Jewish
Variant transcription of Romanov.
ROSEN German, Jewish
Means "Roses" in German
ROSENBAUM Jewish
Ornamental adoption of modern German Rosenbaum "rose bush".
ROSENBLUTH Jewish
Means "rose bloom" in Middle High German.
ROSENSWEIG German, Jewish
Variant form of Rosenzweig.
ROSENTHAL German, Jewish
name for any of numerous places named rosenthal or rosendahl. means " rose valley"
ROSENZWEIG German, Jewish
A German and Jewish surname, meaning "rose twig" or "branch".
ROSSBACH Jewish
Jewish or Eastern European
ROSSDALE Jewish
Anglicized variant of German-Jewish Rosenthal.... [more]
ROTHMAN German, Jewish
German (Rothmann) and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a person with red hair, from an elaborated form of Roth 1. ... [more]
ROTHSTEIN German, Jewish
From German rot meaning "red" and stein meaning "stone".
ROWE Jewish
A shortened form of the surname Horowitz, a variant of the surname Horovic, from the town of Horovice, Czech Republic.
ROYZNBARG Yiddish
Yiddish form of Rosenberg.
RUA Jewish (Rare)
Israel, Spain
RUBIN Jewish
From the given name Reuben.
RUBINOV Russian, Jewish
Means "son of Rubin" in Russian, though it could also be derived from Russian рубин (rubin) "ruby".
RUBINSTEIN German, Jewish, Polish
Means "ruby stone", from rubin and stein. Rubin means "ruby" in German and stein means "stone" in German.
RUESCH German (Swiss), Jewish
Swiss/German variant of Rusch. Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
RUTMAN Jewish, German
1. Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): origin uncertain; perhaps a variant of Rothman. ... [more]
RYBAK Polish, Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Means "fisherman" in some Slavic languages. Derived from the word ryba "fish". A famous bearer is Byelarusian-Norwegian artist Alexander Rybak (b. 1986) who won the Eurovision Song Contest in 2009.
SABAT Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazi) ornamental name from German Sabbat "Sabbath".
SADE Hebrew
Means "field" in Hebrew.
SAENGER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a chorister or a nickname for someone who liked singing, from Middle High German senger, German Sänger meaning "singer".
SAFER Jewish
Variant of Safir.
SAFIR Jewish, Yiddish
Ornamental name from northeastern Yiddish dialect safir and German Saphir ‘sapphire’.
SALTZMAN Jewish, German
Altered spelling of SALZMANN.
SALZMANN German, Jewish
Occupational name for a producer or seller of salt, from German salz "salt" + mann "man".
SAMET German, Jewish, Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of velvet, from Yiddish samet ‘velvet’ (German Samt, ultimately from Greek hexamiton, a compound of hex ‘six’ + mitos ‘thread’).
SAND English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived on patch of sandy soil, from the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish or Jewish name it was often purely ornamental.
SAPERSTEIN Jewish, German
“Sapphire” and “stone”
SAPIR Hebrew
Means "sapphire" in Hebrew.
SAPIRO Jewish
Varient of Shapiro.
SARFATI Jewish
a Sephardic Jewish name which means "French".
SARVER English, Jewish
English and Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic) occupational name from Old French serveur (an agent derivative of server ‘to serve’), Yiddish sarver ‘servant’.
SAUER German, Jewish
Nickname for an embittered or cantankerous person, from Middle High German sur, German sauer "sour".
SAX Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant spelling of Sachs.
SCHAFFNER German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
German: occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of Schaffer.
SCHATTNER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Schaten or Schatten, or a topographic name for someone living in a shady location, from Middle High German schate "shade", "protection".
SCHATZ German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a treasurer, from German Schatz ‘treasure’, Middle High German scha(t)z. It may also have been a nickname for a rich man (or ironically for a miser), or else for a well-liked person or a ladies’ favorite, from the use of the vocabulary word as a term of endearment... [more]
SCHECHTER Yiddish
Yiddish name meaning "butcher."
SCHENKEL German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
SCHILD Jewish
From German Schild "shield", "(house) sign", applied either as an ornamental name or as a habitational name for someone who lived in a house distinguished by a sign.
SCHOEN German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
SCHOMER Jewish
From Hebrew shomer "watchman".
SCHOTTLANDER German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
SCHRAM German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
SCHULER Jewish
Occupational name for a Talmudic scholar or the sexton of a synagogue, from an agent derivative of Yiddish shul "synagogue".
SCHWAB German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): regional name for someone from Swabia (German Schwaben), from Middle High German Swap, German Schwabe ‘Swabian’. The region takes its name from a Germanic tribe recorded from the 1st century BC in the Latin form Suebi or Suevi, of uncertain origin; it was an independent duchy from the 10th century until 1313, when the territory was broken up.
SCHWER Upper German, German, Jewish
South German relationship name from Middle High German sweher ‘father-in-law’. ... [more]
SEID Jewish
Metonymic occupational name from German Seide and Yiddish zayd "silk"
SEIDE German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from Middle High German side, German Seide ‘silk’ (from Late Latin seta, originally denoting animal hair), hence a metonymic occupational name for a manufacturer or seller of silk.
SEIDMAN Jewish, German
Derived from SEID.
SEINFELD German, Jewish
From the German word sein "to be" and the word of German Jewish origin feld which means "field". It was a name given to areas of land that had been cleared of forest.
SHAI Hebrew (Modern)
From the unisex given name Shai.
SHAKED Hebrew
Means Almond in Hebrew
SHAKHAR Hebrew (Modern)
Means "dawn" in Hebrew.
SHALEV Hebrew
Means “peaceful, calm, serene” in Hebrew (see Shalev).
SHALIT Hebrew
From Hebrew שליט (shalit) meaning "ruler" or "ruling, governing, dominant".
SHANI Hebrew
Means "red, scarlet" in Hebrew. From the given name Shani (1).
SHAPIRA Hebrew
Variant spelling of Shapiro.
SHARON Hebrew
From an Old Testament place name, in Hebrew שָׁרוֹן (Sharon), which means "plain", referring to the fertile plain near the coast of Israel.
SHATNER German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Schattner. A notable bearer was Canadian actor William Shatner (1931-), who is known for his roles as Captain James T. Kirk in 'Star Trek', T.J. Hooker in 'T.J. Hooker', Denny Crane in 'Boston Legal', and the Priceline Negotiator in Priceline.com commercials.
SHAVIT Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Shavit, means "comet" in Hebrew.
SHEMESH Hebrew
Means "sun" in Hebrew.
SHEMTOV Hebrew (Modern)
Means "good name", derived from Hebrew שם (shem) means "name" and טוב (tov) means "good".
SHERESHEVSKY Russian, Jewish
Russian Jewish surname derived from Шерешёво (Shereshyovo), the Russian name for the Belarusian city of Шарашова (Sharashova), itself probably derived from the Belarusian dialectal word шэраш (sherash) meaning "ice on (a) river" or "gray"... [more]
SHLOMOV Jewish, Russian
Means "son of Shlomo".
SHNAYDERMAN Yiddish
It literally means "snitherman".
SHOEN German (Anglicized), Jewish
Americanized spelling of German or Ashkenazic Jewish Schön or Schoen.
SHOHAM Hebrew
Means "onyx" in Hebrew.
SHOSHAN Hebrew
From Hebrew שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshán) meaning "lily".
SHPIGL Yiddish
Yiddish form of Spiegel.
SHPILBARG Yiddish
Yiddish form of Spielberg.
SHTEYNFELD Yiddish
It means "stone field".
SHTEYNHOYZ Yiddish
It literally means "stonehouse".
SHULMAN Jewish
It is a Jewish-Polish surname that first appeared around 1090. It means Rabai, Gabbai, or Shamash. These are occupations that take place in a Shul-Synagogue. Shul is the Yiddish word for Synagogue. The name litterally means 'man that goes to the Synagogue'.
SHULTS Jewish (Anglicized, Rare)
The name Shults comes from one of those ancient dukedoms, territories and states that would eventually form a part of present day Germany. At its birth in the Middle Ages, it was used to indicate someone who worked as a town-mayor derived from the medieval name "Schultheis" which has the same meaning.... [more]
SHVARTSEBORD Yiddish
It literally means "black beard".
SILBER German, Jewish
From Middle High German "silber," meaning "silver." Metonymic occupational name for a silversmith, or often, in the case of the Jewish surname, an ornamental name.
SILBERMAN German, Jewish
Variant of Silber, with the addition of Middle High German man meaning "man" or Yiddish man meaning "man".
SILBERSTEIN German, Jewish
From Middle High German silber "silver" and stein "stone"; a habitational name from a place so named in Bavaria, or a topographic name.... [more]
SIMANTOV Hebrew (Modern)
Means "good sign", derived from Hebrew סימן (siman) means "sign" and טוב (tov) means "good".
SIMKIN Jewish
Means "son of Simke", Simke being a diminutive of the Yiddish feminine name Sime (from Hebrew Simcha, literally "joy").
SISSELMAN Yiddish
Possibly from German meaning "sweet man"
SLONIM Jewish
Habitational name from Slonim, a city in Belarus.
SLUTSKY Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Slutsk, a city in Belarus.
SNOW English, Jewish (Anglicized)
Nickname denoting someone with very white hair or an exceptionally pale complexion, from Old English snaw "snow".... [more]
SNYDER Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
SOHINKI Jewish
Unknown meaning. A notable bearer is YouTube Personality Matt Sohinki, better known simply as Sohinki, who is a member of Smosh Games.
SONTAG German, Jewish
"sunday;" usually given to a person who was born on a sunday.
SORENSON Jewish
Means "son of the son of Sore", a Yiddish female personal name (from Hebrew Sara, literally "princess"), with the addition of the Slavic possessive suffix -in and German Sohn "son".
SOROKA Ukranian, Jewish
From the nickname Soroka meaning "magpie", which indicates a thievish person or a person with a white streak of hair among black hair.
SPECTOR Jewish
Occupational name from Polish szpektor "teacher's assistant in a Jewish school", a derivative of Polish inspecktor "supervisor".
SPERO Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Spiro.
SPICER English, Jewish, Polish
English: occupational name for a seller of spices, Middle English spic(i)er (a reduced form of Old French espicier, Late Latin speciarius, an agent derivative of species ‘spice’, ‘groceries’, ‘merchandise’).... [more]
SPIEGEL German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" (via Old High German from Latin speculum, a derivative of specere "to look").
SPIEGLER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" and the agent suffix -er.
SPIELBERG Jewish, German
From Old High German spiegel "lookout point" or German Spiel "game, play" and berg "mountain". Locational surname after a town in Austria. A famous bearer is American director Steven Spielberg (1946-present).
SPINDLER English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spindle maker, from an agent derivative of Middle English spindle, Middle High German spindel, German Spindel, Yiddish shpindl "spindle, distaff".
SPRINGER German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
STANG German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German stang, German Stange ‘pole’, ‘shaft’, hence a nickname for a tall, thin person, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wooden shafts for spears and the like, or a metonymic occupational name for a soldier.
STAR German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STAUB German (Swiss), German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational nickname for a miller, from Middle High German stoup, German Staub ‘dust’. The Jewish surname may also be ornamental.
STAUBER German, Jewish
An occupational name from Staub, with the addition of the German agent suffix -er.
STEINBACH German, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STEINER German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for someone who worked with stone: a quarry-man, stone-cutter, or stonemason; an agent derivative of Stein. Also can be a topographic name for someone who lived on stony ground or near a prominent outcrop of rock.
STEINMETZ German, Jewish
Occupational name from Middle High German steinmetze, German steinmetz "stonemason", "worker in stone".
STOLLER German, Jewish, English
Habitational surname for someone from a place called Stolle, near Zurich (now called Stollen).... [more]
STORCH German, Jewish
From Middle High German storch "stork", hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the bird.
STRASSBERG Jewish
Ornamental name composed of German Strasse "street" and Berg "mountain, hill".
STRASSMANN German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone living on a main street, from Middle High German strasse, German Strasse "street, road" and man "man".
STRAUSS German, Jewish
From the German word strauß, meaning "ostrich." In its use as a Jewish surname, it comes from the symbol of the building or family that the bearer occupied or worked for in the Frankfurter Judengasse... [more]
SUSSMAN German, Jewish
In German, this is an elaborated form of Süß, meaning "sweet man".... [more]
TABAK Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a seller of tobacco, from German Tabak, Yiddish and Ukrainian tabik (all ultimately from Spanish tabaco, a word of Caribbean origin). Tobacco was introduced to Europe in the 16th century.
TABOR English, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
English: metonymic occupational name for a drummer, from Middle English, Old French tabo(u)r ‘drum’.... [more]
TAL Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Tal, means "dew" in Hebrew.
TAMIR Hebrew
from the given name Tamir. Tamir means Tall.
TANNEN German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places in Lower Saxony or Baden named with German Tannen ‘pine’, or from a short form of any of the many compound names formed with this element... [more]
TANNENBAUM Jewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) topographic name or Jewish ornamental name from German Tannenbaum ‘fir tree’, ‘pine tree’.
TARTAKOVSKY Jewish, Russian
Russian Jewish surname denoting someone originally from the village of Tartakov (Тартаків) in Ukraine. The village's name itself is derived from Ukrainian тартак (tartak) referring to a sawmill or cutting device.
TATELMAN Russian, Yiddish
Man who tats or sew
TEITELBOIM Yiddish (Spanish)
Castilianized form of Teytlboym.
TEYTLBOYM Yiddish
It literally means "date tree".
THAL Jewish, German
Ornamental and topographic name derived from German Tal "valley".
TISCH Jewish, German
Metonymic occupational name for a joiner, from German "Tisch", Yiddish "tish" meaning table.
TKACH Jewish
Ashkenazi Jewish and Ukrainian surname meaning tailor.
TKACZ Polish, Jewish
Variant of Tkach. Means 'to weave'
TOPAZ Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Topaz, which is a kind of a precious stone.
TOUATI Arabic (Maghrebi), Judeo-Spanish
Habitual family name denoting someone who originated from the Touat (or Tuat) desert region in Algeria. It is also sometimes used by North African Sephardic Jews.
TREU German, Jewish
From a nickname for a trustworthy person, from late Middle High German triuwe ‘loyal’. As a Jewish surname it is mainly ornamental.
TROY English, German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As an English surname, it is a habitational name from Troyes in Aude, France. There was also an Anglo-Norman family of this name in Ireland.... [more]
TURKIEH Ancient Hebrew, Arabic, Jewish
A Lebanese jewish surname that is often used among Lebanese jews in Israel.
TZUR Hebrew
Means "cliff, rock" in Hebrew.
URBAN English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian, Jewish
From a medieval personal name (Latin Urbanus meaning "city dweller", a derivative of urbs meaning "town", "city").
VARDI Hebrew
From the given names Vered or Varda which means "rose" in Hebrew.
VASERSHTEYN Yiddish
It literally means "water stone".
VAYSEBLUM Yiddish
It literally means "white flower"
WAHL German, Jewish
From Middle High German Walhe, Walch "foreigner from a Romance country", hence a nickname for someone from Italy or France, etc. This surname is also established in Sweden.
WALDSTEIN German, Jewish
Habitational surname for a person from a place in Bohemia called Waldstein, which is derived from Middle High German walt "forest" + stein "stone".
WASSER German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German wazzer "water".
WEIL German, Jewish
South German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places so named in Baden, Bavaria, and Württemberg, from Latin villa ‘country house’, ‘estate’ (later used of a group of houses forming a settlement).
WEILER German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places so named in southern Germany. Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Weil.
WEINBACH German, Jewish
From the name of a commune in Hesse, Germany.
WEINBERG German, Jewish
Weinberg means "Vineyard" in german.
WEINMANN German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational name for a viticulturalist or wine merchant, Middle High German winman, German Weinmann.
WEINSTEIN German, Jewish
Ashkenazi Jewish surname meaning "wine stone" from German wein meaning “wine” and stein meaning “stone, rock”. It refers to potassium bitartrate crystals produced as a result of fermenting grapes.
WEINSTOCK English, German, Hebrew
This surname of WEINSTOCK is the English variant of the German surname WENSTOCK, an occupational name for a producer or seller of wine, derived originally from the Old German WEIN. The name was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews, largely recollecting the prominence of wine in the Jewish Scriptures and its used in Jewish ceremonies... [more]
WEISENBURGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of numerous places named Weissenburg "white fortress".
WEISMAN German, German (Austrian), Jewish
A German surname meaning "white man"
WEISZ Jewish
Hungarian spelling of WEISS.
WERTHEIMER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Wertheim.
WIESEL German, Jewish
Means "weasel" in German.
WIESENTHAL Jewish
Ornamental name from German Wiese "meadow" + Tal "valley".
WILD Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
WINEHOUSE Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
WINKEL German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
WINKELMANN German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’. ... [more]
WITTLIN Jewish
Eastern Ashkenazic, from the Yiddish female personal name Vitle, a pet form of Vite combined with the eastern Slavic suffix -in
WITZ German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’. Also a variant of Witzig. ... [more]
WLODAWSKI Jewish
Habitual surname from Włodawa, Poland. First seen in a 1806 revision list of the city Kobryn (Grodno Guberniya), now Kobryn Belarus. ... [more]
WOLOWITZ Jewish
This is the surname of the character Howard in the American television show "The Big Bang Theory".
WOŹNIAK Polish, Jewish
Derivative or patronymic from the occupational or status term wozny ‘beadle’, ‘city official’.
YAKOBASHVILI Georgian, Jewish
Means "son of Iakob" in Georgian.
YARCHI Hebrew
From Hebrew יָרֵחַ (yareach), meaning "moon".
YARDEN Hebrew (Rare)
From the given name Yarden, which is named after the Jordan (2) River. ... [more]
YARDENI Hebrew (Modern)
Means "of Jordan (2)" in Hebrew.
YEFET Hebrew
From the given name Yefet. (see Japheth)
YOMTOV Hebrew (Modern)
Means "good day", derived from Hebrew יום (yom) means "day" and טוב (tov) means "good".
YONAH Jewish
Hebrew for "dove" יונה
YOSEF Hebrew, Arabic
From the given name Yosef.
YOVEL Hebrew
Means "jubilee" or "anniversary" in Hebrew, usually refers to a 50 years anniversary.
YUSUPOV Uzbek, Avar, Tajik, Turkmen, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Russian, Tatar, Crimean Tatar, Jewish
Means "son of Yusup", also used by Central Asian Jews. This was the name of a Russian family of nobility of Crimean Tatar ancestry.
ZAHAVI Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew זָהָב (zaháv) meaning "gold".
ZAKEN Hebrew
Means "old man" in Hebrew.
ZASLAVSKI Russian, Jewish
Variant transcription of Zaslavsky. A notable music producer ZEDD's real name is Anton Zaslavski.
ZASLAVSKY Russian, Jewish
Russian Jewish surname derived from Iziaslav (also called Zaslav), the name of a city in Volhynia, Ukraine.
ZATZ Jewish
Abbreviation of the Hebrew phrase Zera TSadikim "seed of the righteous", assumed in a spirit of pious respect for one’s ancestors.
ZAYCHIK Russian, Jewish
Means "bunny" in Russian.
ZAYDMAN Jewish
Russian variant of SEIDMAN.
ZECHMAN Jewish
Occupational name from Yiddish tsekh meaning "guild" or "craft corporation" and man "man".
ZE'EV Hebrew
Means "wolf" in Hebrew.
ZELDIN Jewish
Means "son of Zelde", a Yiddish female personal name based on Middle High German sælde "fortunate, blessed".
ZELLER German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
ZELNICK Jewish
Occupational name for a tax collecter, comes from Yiddish tselnik which means haberdashery.
ZIELONKA Polish, Jewish
Derived from the Polish word for "green"
ZINGESER Jewish, Yiddish
Comes from Yiddish "ציו" meaning "Tin" and "גייסער" meaning "Smith".
ZIPPERSTEIN Jewish
Stein is German for the English word stone.
ZIV Hebrew
From the given name Ziv.
ZLATKIN Jewish
Meaning, "gold" or "yellow."
ZOHAR Hebrew
Derived from the the given name Zohar meaning "light, brilliance" in Hebrew.
ZOLLER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a customs officer, Middle High German zoller.
ZUARETZ Hebrew (Modern)
Means "this land" in Hebrew, also Hebrew form of Suárez.
ZUCKERBERG German, Jewish
Means "sugar mountain" from German zucker meaning "sugar" and berg meaning "mountain, hill".
ZWILLING German, Jewish
Means "a twin", as in a twin brother or twin sister. Often given to those who were twins.