Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Lucille.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABOULAFIA Jewish
Variant spelling of Abulafia, which was originally a Sephardi Jewish surname of Arabic etymological origin.
AKHMATOVA Tatar, Russian
Feminine form of Akhmatov, meaning "son of Äxmät".
AKITA Japanese
This surname can be used as 秋田, 明田, 穐田, 飽田 or 阿北 with 秋/穐 (shuu, aki, toki) meaning "autumn," 明 (mei, myou, min, a.kari, aka.rui, aka.rumu, aki.raka, a.keru, -a.ke, a.ku(ru), a.kasu) meaning "clear," 飽 (hou, a.kiru, a.kasu, a.ku, aki) meaning "boredom," 阿 (a, o, omone.ru, kuma) meaning "corner, nook," 田 (den, ta) meaning "rice field" and 北 (hou, kita) meaning "north."... [more]
ALBINET French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Albinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Albin.... [more]
ALISTON English
Variant of Allerston, a habitational surname derived from a place so named in North Yorkshire.
ARISEN English (Modern)
From a Dutch surname that means "son of Aris". In The Netherlands, this name is never used as a first name, since Dutch law strictly prohibits the use of surnames as first names. Therefore, if this name is indeed sometimes used as a first name in the United States (where it *is* allowed to use surnames as first names), one should classify Arisen as an (American-)English first name.
ARUNDEL English
English surname which comes from two distinct sources. Either it was derived from a place name meaning "horehound valley" in Old English (from harhune "horehound (a plant)" and dell "valley"), or it was from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond "swallow", which was originally a Norman nickname given to someone resembling a swallow.
ASHFORD English
Derived from Ashford, which is the name of several places in England. All but one of these derive the second element of their name from Old English ford meaning "ford" - for the one in North Devon, it is derived from Old English worō or worth meaning "enclosure".... [more]
ASTORE Italian
Derived from Italian astore meaning "goshawk", which is a bird of prey that was used for hunting in the Middle Ages. The surname had first started out as a nickname: either for a falconer, or for a person who had aquiline features or who was cunning by nature.
AUBINE French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French feminine given name Aubine, which was the French form of Albina. But in other words, you could also say that Aubine was the feminine form of Aubin.
AUBINET French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Aubinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Aubin.... [more]
AUDEN English
This surname is derived from the Germanic given name Aldwin, of which the Old English equivalent is Ealdwine. Also compare Alden, which is a surname that has the same etymological origins. The surname Auden was probably formed during the time of the Norman French occupation of England, as Germanic names containing -al- usually became -au- in Norman French... [more]
AXFORD English
Derived from Axford, which is the name of two villages in England (one is located in the county of Hampshire, the other in Wiltshire). Both villages derive their name from Old English æsc(e) "ash tree(s)" and Old English ford "ford", which gives their name the meaning of "ford by the ash trees" or "a ford with ash trees"... [more]
BADRINETTE English
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
BAEZ Spanish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Spanish Báez, which might be a different form of Peláez (cf. Páez). A famous bearer is American singer and activist Joan Baez (1941-).... [more]
BARZELAI Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai.
BARZELAIJ Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzelay. Also compare Barzilaij. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 6 bearers in 1947 and less than 5 bearers in 2007.
BARZELAY Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai via Barzelai. A known bearer of this surname is American-Israeli musician Eef Barzelay (b. 1970).
BARZILAI Hebrew
Derived from Barzillai, the name of a character from the Talmud. His name meant "man of iron" or "iron-hearted", derived from Hebrew בַּרְזֶל (barzél) "iron".
BARZILAIJ Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzilay. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 112 bearers in 1947 and only 51 bearers in 2007.
BARZILAY Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai.
BAUDRIC French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudric, which was a variant form of Baldéric, the French form of Baldric.
BAUDRY French
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudry, which was a variant form of Baudric, a given name that itself was a variant form of Baldéric (see Baldric). A known bearer of this surname was the French painter Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry (1828-1886).
BAUMFREE Dutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
BEAUFAY French (Rare)
In most cases, this surname is a locational surname that most likely took its name from the village of Beaufay, which is nowadays located in the Sarthe department of France. The village was called Bello Faeto, Bellofaido and Belfaidus during the Early Middle Ages, ultimately deriving its name from Latin bellus fagus (or bellum fagetum) meaning "beautiful beech tree(s)" or "beautiful beech woodland"... [more]
BEAUFOY French (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Beaufay. Known bearers of this surname include the English astronomer and physicist Mark Beaufoy (1764-1827) and the British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (b. 1967).
BEAUSÉJOUR French (Rare)
Literally means "beautiful sojourn", derived from French beau "beautiful, nice, fine" and French séjour "sojourn, short stay". As such, this surname is most likely a locational surname, in that it originally referred to a scenic place to sojourn in... [more]
BELFIORE Italian
Means "beautiful (as a) flower", derived from Italian bel "beautiful" combined with Italian fiore "flower". Two Italian sources claim that this surname was derived from the medieval masculine given name Belfiore (which has of course the same meaning), but I can find no evidence that this was an actual given name in medieval Italy... [more]
BELLUMUS Late Roman
Means "beautiful man" derived from the elements bellus "beautiful" and homo "man"
BERNOULLI French
French patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Bernoul (which was probably derived from Bernold or Bernolf).
BISBEE English
Named after the city of Bisbee which is in Arizona.... [more]
BLAKEWAY English
Literally means "black way", thus referring to a black road near which the original bearer must have lived. A famous bearer of this surname was Jacob Blakeway (b. 1583-?), the biological father of Mayflower passenger Richard More (1614-1696).
BONNEMAISON French
Literally means "good house", derived from French bonne "good" and French maison "house". As such, this surname is most likely a locational surname, in that it originally either referred to someone who lived in a good house (probably more like a mansion) or to someone who was born in (or lived in) the place Bonnemaison, which is nowadays located in the Calvados department of France... [more]
BRANCACCIA Italian (Rare)
Derived from the medieval Italian given name Brancazia, which is the feminine form of the masculine given name Brancazio. For more information, please see the entry for the patronymic surname Brancazio... [more]
BRANCACCIO Italian
Variant form of Brancazio. There are a few sources that claim that the surname is derived from a place name (which would make it a locational surname), but that claim is incorrect, as all Italian geographical places carrying the name Brancaccio were either established long after the Middle Ages (by which time virtually all Italians already had a hereditary surname) or were named after a person who had Brancaccio for a surname... [more]
BRANCALEONE Italian
Derived from the medieval Italian masculine given name Brancaleone, which means either "a lion's paw" or "he who captures the lion". In the case of the former meaning, the name is derived from Italian branca meaning "paw, claw" combined with Italian leone meaning "lion"... [more]
BRANCATELLA Italian (Rare)
Derived from the feminine given name Brancatella, which is a diminutive of the medieval Italian given name Brancazia, the feminine form of the masculine given name Brancazio. For more information about this, please see the entry for the patronymic surname of Brancazio... [more]
BRANCATELLO Italian (Rare)
Derived from the masculine given name Brancatello, which is a diminutive of the medieval Italian given name Brancazio, itself ultimately derived from the late Latin given name Brancatius... [more]
BRANCATO Italian
This surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a place name (thus making it a locational surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval Italian given name Brancato, which is a variant form of the given name Brancazio, itself ultimately derived from the late Latin given name Brancatius... [more]
BRANCAZIO Italian (Rare)
Derived from the medieval Italian masculine given name Brancazio, which itself is derived from Brancatius (also found spelled as Brancaccius and Brancatus), a late Latin corruption of the given name Pancratius... [more]
BRIATORE Italian
This surname originates from the province of Cuneo in the Piedmont region of Italy. It is probably derived from Piedmontese brijador meaning "postilion, coachman", which itself is ultimately derived from Piedmontese bria meaning "bridles, reins".... [more]
CACCIATORE Italian
Derived from Italian cacciatore meaning "hunter, huntsman", which is ultimately derived from the Italian verb cacciare meaning "to hunt".... [more]
CAMARGO Spanish
Habitational name for someone from a place in Andalusia called Camargo.
CANOMANUEL Spanish
The first part of this surname is possibly derived from Spanish cano "hoary, white-haired, grey-haired". The second part is derived from the given name Manuel. As such, this name must first have come into being as a nickname, referring to the white or grey hair of a man named Manuel.
CENTOFANTE Italian
Variant form of Centofanti.
CENTOFANTI Italian
Means "a hundred soldiers on foot" in Italian, derived from Italian cento meaning "(a) hundred" and Italian fanti, which is the plural form of fante meaning "soldier, infantryman"... [more]
D'AUREVALLE French (Archaic)
This medieval surname literally means "from Aurevalle". Aurevalle can refer to any of the three French communes that are nowadays known by the more modern spelling Orival. All of them ultimately derive their name from Latin aurea vallis meaning "golden vale" or "golden valley".
D'AURÉVILLE French
Variant spelling of d'Aureville.
D'AUREVILLE French
This surname literally means "from Aureville". Aureville is a commune in southwestern France, which was established in late medieval times. It derives its name from Latin aurea villa or villa aurea which literally means "golden country-house, golden farm" but of course later came to mean "golden village".
D'AUREVILLY French
Variant form of d'Aureville. A known bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly (1808-1889).
D'OREVALLE French (Archaic)
Variant form of d'Aurevalle. A known bearer of this surname was the medieval bishop Hugh d'Orevalle (d. 1084 or 1085).
D'ORIVAL French
Variant form of d'Oreval. This is also one of the very few forms (of what is ultimately the d'Aurevalle surname) that is still in use nowadays.
DRAKEFORD English
The first element of this locational surname is probably derived from the personal name Draca or Draki (see Drake), while the second element is derived from Old English ford meaning "ford"... [more]
DUESTERWALD German
Variant spelling of Düsterwald.
DUISTERWOUD Dutch
Dutch equivalent of Düsterwald.
DÜSTERWALD German
Derived from Middle Low German düster "dark" combined with Old High German wald "forest".
FANCOURT English
Derived from the English surname Fancourt, which originated in the county of Bedfordshire in England.
FERRAND French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
FERRANDIN French (Rare)
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from the name of a profession (thus making it an occupational surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the masculine given name Ferrandin, which was a diminutive of the medieval French given name Ferrand... [more]
FERRANDINO Italian
Derived from the masculine given name Ferrandino, which is a diminutive of the medieval Italian given name Ferrando. For more information about this, please see the entry for the patronymic surname of Ferrando.... [more]
FERRANDO Italian, Spanish
This surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval masculine given name Ferrando, which was in use in both Italy and Spain during the Middle Ages... [more]
FERRANTE Italian
This surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval masculine given name Ferrante... [more]
FERRANTINO Italian
Derived from the masculine given name Ferrantino, which is a diminutive of the medieval Italian given name Ferrante. For more information about this, please see the entry for the patronymic surname of Ferrante.
FRASCATORE Italian (Rare)
Meaning uncertain. It is possibly derived from (or related to) Italian frasca meaning "bough, branch", which might possibly indicate that the surname had first started out as a nickname for someone who worked as a woodcutter or as a forester... [more]
FRUSCIANTE Italian
Derived from the Italian adjective frusciante meaning "rustling, swishing, whishing", which itself is derived from the Italian verb frusciare meaning "to rustle, to swish, to whish". The surname had probably started out as a nickname for someone who made a rustling or whishing sound whenever they walked, which was probably caused by the clothes that they were wearing (in that the clothes must have been made of a certain fabric that is prone to making some noise when touched in any way).... [more]
GALVAN Irish
Variant form of O'Galvin (see also Galvin).
GALVIN Irish
Variant form of O'Galvin.
GAMELIN French
From pet form of any of the compound personal names formed with gamal, related to Old Norse gamall, Old German gamel "old", "aged". ... [more]
JEAUME French (Rare)
Variant form of the patronymic surname of Jaume.
KRČMAR Croatian
Derived from Croatian krčmar meaning "innkeeper, tavern owner, barkeeper", which is ultimately derived from Croatian krčma meaning "inn, tavern, pub".... [more]
MALEFEIJT Dutch
A variant spelling of Malefeyt. This is also actually an archaic spelling (as the sound written as -eijt will be always be written as -eit or -ijt in modern times), but it has (barely) managed to survive into modern times... [more]
MALEFEYT Dutch (Archaic)
Archaic Dutch surname that is now no longer in use (not in this exact spelling, that is): the spelling reflects the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
MALEFIJT Dutch
Modern form of Malefeyt, which is also the most common form of the surname. In The Netherlands, there were 24 bearers of the surname in 2007.
MALFAIT French
Derived from French mal fait, which literally means "poorly done, badly done". In the context of the surname, it refers to the first bearer being "malformed" or "deformed" (as it was in the eyes of people from older times), which means that he either was physically disabled or able-bodied but with a physical trait that deviated from the norm.
MALFEYT Dutch, Flemish
Generally a Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Malfait, with the spelling reflecting the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
MALIKSI Filipino, Tagalog
Means "active, quick, alert" in Tagalog.
MAXIMOVICH Russian
Means "son of Maxim".
MESSIAEN Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
MIER Spanish, Dutch, English (American)
As a Spanish name relates to late summer and means "harvest" or "ripened".... [more]
MILEY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Ó MAOL AODHA, though Ó MÁILLE and Ó MAOLMHUAIDH can also be possibilities. See Molloy (and Mulloy) and Milley (and Mulley) for comparison. A known bearer of this surname is James "Bubber" Miley (1903-1932), an American jazz musician.
MONTEFIORE Italian, Jewish
Derived from Montefiore, which is the name of several places in Italy. For example, there is Castle Montefiore in the town of Recanati (province of Macerata), the municipality of Montefiore Conca (province of Rimini) and the municipality of Montefiore dell'Aso (province of Ascoli Piceno)... [more]
O'GALVIN Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Gealbháin, which means "descendant of the bright, fair one", derived from the Gaelic elements geal "bright" and ban "fair, white". A known bearer of the original form of the surname is Ciarán Ó Gealbháin, former signer of the Irish traditional music band Danú.
PACQUIAO Cebuano, Filipino
Hispanicized variant form of Paquiao. A famous bearer of this surname is the Filipino world champion professional boxer Manny Pacquiao (b. 1978).
PAQUIAO Filipino (Spanish), Cebuano (Spanish)
Hispanicized form of the Cebuano surname Pakyaw (also found spelled as Pakiaw and Pakaw), which is derived from Cebuano pakyaw meaning "wholesale" or "to buy or pay in bulk".
PARATORE Italian
Derived from Italian paratore meaning "decorator, fuller", which refers to a craftsman who fulls coarse cloth. In other words: this surname is the Italian cognate of the English surname Fuller... [more]
PETKE German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
PETRIE English
Patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Peter.
PIEDNOEL French
Modern (and also more common) form of Piénoel.
PIÉNOEL French (Rare)
French surname that possibly refers to the buckled shoes that the original bearer was wearing, in which case it is derived from Old French pié meaning "foot" combined with Old French noiel meaning "buckle"... [more]
POULTON English
English surname that means "settlement by a pool".
PRINCIP Bosnian, Serbian
Probably derived from Latin princeps "leader, initiator, prince", which itself was ultimately derived from primus "first" and capere "to take". The surname may thus have originated as a nickname for someone with a princely appearance, or for someone who was the illegitimate offspring of a prince... [more]
PUSHKIN Russian
Derived from Russian пушка (pushka) meaning "gun, cannon". A notable bearer was Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), a Russian poet and writer.
ROASCIO Italian (Rare)
Derived from Roascio, the name of a municipality in the province of Cuneo in the Piedmont region of Italy. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roass in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROASIO Italian
This surname originates from the Piedmont region of Italy. It is most likely derived from Roasio, which is the name of a municipality in that same region. The meaning of the municipality's name is uncertain, but since it is located in Piedmont and known as Roaso in the Piedmontese language, the etymological origin of the name is most likely Piedmontese... [more]
ROBERTIN French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name Robert.
ROBINET French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Robin.... [more]
RUITER Dutch
Derived from the Dutch noun ruiter meaning "rider, horseman".
RULINSKAS Lithuanian (Latinized, Rare)
Meaning and origin still unknown.
SALVATORE Italian
Derived from the Italian masculine given name Salvatore, which in turn was derived from the Italian noun salvatore meaning "saviour, rescuer". The word ultimately comes from Latin salvator meaning "saviour"... [more]
SCOTFORD English
Derived from Scotforth, the name of a village near Lancaster (in Lancashire) in England. The village's name means "ford of the Scot(s)" and is derived from Old English Scott "Scot" combined with Old English ford "ford".
SINEATH English, Irish
Variant of Sinnott. Not to be confused with the Irish first name Sinéad.
SINNOTT English, Irish
From the medieval personal name Sinod (from Old English Sigenōth, literally "victory-brave").... [more]
SIONÓID Irish
Gaelicization of Sinnott.
SJOERDSMA Frisian, Dutch
Derived from the Frisian given name Sjoerd combined with the Frisian surname suffix -(s)ma, which is most likely derived from Old Frisian monna meaning "men".... [more]
SNAPE English (British), Scottish
An old, now rare surname, with various origins in Suffolk and Yorkshire in England and Lanarkshire in Scotland. This is also the name of Severus Snape, a character from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series.
SPADAFORA Italian
Variant form of Spatafora. Spadafora is the younger out of the two surnames and yet the most common of the two, which might partly be because it is a little bit more italianized. After all, spada is the modern Italian word for "sword", which indicates that Spadafora is 'closer' to Italian than Spatafora, which is closer to the original Greek origin instead (as the first element of the surname is derived from Greek spathe meaning "blade, sword").... [more]
SPATAFORA Italian
This surname originates from the Italian island of Sicily, where it was first borne by a noble family of Byzantine origin, which had settled on the island in the 11th century AD. Their surname was derived from the Greek noun σπάθη (spathe) "blade, sword" (akin to Latin spatha "broad sword with a double edge") combined with Greek φορεω (phoreo) "to carry, to bear", which gives the surname the meaning of "he who carries the sword" or "sword-bearer"... [more]
SPRINGFIELD English
Dusty Springfield 1939-1999
STIRRETT Scottish
Variant of Starrett, probably via Sterrett (since that would better explain the sound transformation).
SYRETT English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Syred (from Old English Sigerǣd, literally "victory-counsel"); or (ii) from the medieval female personal name Sigerith (from Old Norse Sigfrithr, literally "victory-lovely").
THORNLEY English
Derived from Thornley, which is the name of three villages in England (two are located in the county of Durham, the third in Lancashire). All three villages derive their name from Old English þorn "thorn" and Old English leah "clearing (in a wood), glade", which gives their name the meaning of "the thorny glade"... [more]
TORNATORE Italian
Derived from Italian tornatore meaning "turner", which refers to a craftsman who turns and shapes various materials (such as wood and metal) on a lathe. In other words: this surname is the Italian cognate of the English surname Turner... [more]
TOUSSAINT French
Derived from the given name Toussaint, which in turn is derived from Toussaint, the French name for the Christian feast day All Saints' Day (celebrated on November 1st every year). The French name for the feast day is a contraction of French tous les saints meaning "all (of) the saints".... [more]
TREGORY Cornish (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
This obscure British surname is a variant form of Tregury, which is an anglicization of the rare Cornish surname Tregurtha.... [more]
TREGURTHA Cornish
A rare Cornish surname that derives its name from either the manor of Tregurtha in the parish of St. Hilary (located in west Cornwall) or from the hamlet of Tregurtha Barton in the parish of St. Wenn (located in central Cornwall)... [more]
ULENSPEGEL Low German, Literature
This is the name of Dyl Ulenspegel is a trickster figure originating in Middle Low German folklore, possibly meaning "owl mirror".
WEINGARTNER German
Derived from German weingärtner meaning "wine maker, vintner", which itself is derived from German weingarten meaning "vineyard". The latter is a composite word consisting of German wein "wine" combined with German garten "garden"... [more]
WILLETT English
From a pet form of Will, or an Americanized form of French Ouellette.
WINEGARDNER English (American)
Anglicized form of the German occupational surname Weingartner. A known bearer of this surname is the American writer Mark Winegardner (b. 1961).
WÜRDEMANN German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
WYLDEN English
Variant of Wilden.