Submitted Surnames Starting with C

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CILLIËRSAfrikaans
Brought to South Africa by settlers of French decent some time in the past 300 years. Sometimes also a given name for boys.
CIMAROSAItalian
from "Cima" Top, and "Rosa" A rose or the Color Pink. A famous Bearer of this surname is the Italian composer Domenico Cimarosa(1749-1801).
CIMINOItalian
Occupational name for a spice dealer, from cimino "cumin", Sicilian ciminu.
ÇINARTurkish
Means "oriental plane tree (Platanus orientalis)" in Turkish, of Persian origin. The oriental plane tree is widely revered throughout Central Asia.
CINARDOItalian
From Italy
CINFUEGOSAsturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Quirós.
CINGESWELLEnglish
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CINNAMONDScottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CINTRONSpanish
Spanish form for the french "Citroen". Original from Puerto Rico.
CINWELLEnglish
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CIOBANURomanian
Romanian surname meaning "sheperd".
CIOCCAItalian
The origin has to do with hair
CIORARomanian (Rare)
Derived from a Romanian place name.
CIRCELLISicilian
Derived from Sicilian circedda meaning "(hoop) earring", originally used to denote someone who wore hoop earrings.
CIRIASpanish
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous Castilian municipality.
CĪRULISLatvian
Means "lark".
CITARELLANeapolitan
Occupational name for someone who made or played a guitar, derived from chitarra or catarra "guitar".
CITRINEJewish
An invented Jewish name based on Yiddish tsitrin "lemon tree".
CIUBOTARURomanian
Means "boot maker" in Romanian, the one that makes boots ("ciubota" (singular), regionalism for "cizma"/"gheata"). Not the same with "shoe maker" (or "Schumacher" in German) as the Romanian "Ciubotar" refers strictly to boots and not all kinds of shoes.
CLAASSENGerman
The name Claassen means "son of Klaus." It's primarily German, but it's also Dutch and Danish.
CLAIRMONTEnglish
Means "bright hill."
CLARENCEEnglish
From the given name Clarence.
CLAREYIrish
Anglicized form of Ó Cléirigh and variant of O'Clery and Cleary.
CLARYIrish
Variant of CLEARY
CLATTENBURGAncient Germanic, Anglo-Saxon
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
CLAUDEFrench
From the first name Claude.
CLAUDELFrench
From the given name Claudel.
CLAVELLFrench
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
CLAWEnglish
The surname Claw is a very rare English surname.
CLAYBERGEnglish
Meaning is unknown, but it most likely means "clay mountain", from surnames Clay "clay" and Berg "mountain".
CLEAVEEnglish
From an English topographical name meaning "cliff".
CLEAVELANDEnglish
Spelling variant of Cleveland.
CLEBURNEEnglish
Cleburne is a surname of Northern English and Southern Scottish Anglo-Saxon origin.
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
CLELLANDScots, Irish
Scottish and Irish topographical name meaning "clay land".
CLEMENTSEnglish
Means "son of Clement".
CLEMMONSEnglish
Derived from the Latin first name Clement, Clemmons means "merciful".
CLEMOEnglish
From a Cornish form of the personal name CLEMENT.
CLERIHEWScottish
A Scottish surname of unknown origin and meaning. A clerihew is a humorous or satirical verse consisting of two rhyming couplets in lines of irregular metre about someone who is named in the poem. It was invented by the British author Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956; Clerihew was his mother's maiden name)... [more]
CLERKEnglish
Variant spelling of Clark.
CLEVELANDOld English, English, Popular Culture
English regional name from the district around Middlesbrough named Cleveland ‘the land of the cliffs’, from the genitive plural (clifa) of Old English clif ‘bank’, ‘slope’ + land ‘land’... [more]
CLEVELANDNorwegian (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Norwegian Kleiveland or Kleveland, habitational names from any of five farmsteads in Agder and Vestlandet named with Old Norse kleif "rocky ascent" or klefi "closet" (an allusion to a hollow land formation) and land "land".
CLEVERLEYEnglish
Probably means "person from Cleveley", Lancashire ("woodland clearing by a cliff").
CLINGEREnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Klinger.Possibly a variant of Clinker. an English occupational name for a maker or fixer of bolts and rivets.
CLINKENBEARDLow German
Possibly an Americanized form of North German Klingebiel, a variant of Klingbeil.
CLINKEREnglish (British, ?)
Possibly a varient of Clinger.
CLIVEEnglish
English surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
CLOPTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Essex, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, named Clopton from Old English clopp(a) meaning "rock", "hill" + tūn meaning "settlement".
CLOREEnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Klor (from a short form of the medieval personal name Hilarius (see Hillary) or Klar).
CLOUDEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived near an outcrop or hill, from Old English clud "rock" (only later used to denote vapor formations in the sky).
CLOUDFrench
From the Germanic personal name Hlodald, composed of the elements hlod "famous, clear" and wald "rule", which was borne by a saint and bishop of the 6th century.
CLOYDWelsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Clwyd.
CLUFFEnglish
Derived from pre 7th century word "cloh" meaning a ravine or steep-sided valley.
CLUTEDutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
CLWYDWelsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
CLYNavajo
From Navajo tłʼaaí meaning ‎"lefty, left-handed one", from the verb nishtłʼa ‎"to be left-handed".
CLYDEScottish
A river in the south-west of Scotland, running through Inverclyde, Ayrshire, Dunbartonshire, Lanarkshire, and the city of Glasgow. The second longest in Scotland; and the eighth longest in the United Kingdom... [more]
CMIELPolish
From the Polish noun 'trzmiel', which means "bumblebee."
COAKLEYIrish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COARDGerman
Derived from the first name Konrad.
COATHEnglish
Derived from the Cornish word for smith, goff.
COBAINScottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COBALTEnglish
Name given to a person who mined cobalt.
ÇOBANTurkish
Means "shepherd" in Turkish.
COBBOLDEnglish
From the medieval male personal name Cubald (from Old English Cūthbeald, literally "famous-brave").
COBERLEYEnglish
Possibly from a village in England called Coberley
COCHRANEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
COCIÑAGalician
It literally means "kitchen".
COCKEEnglish
nickname from Middle English cok ‘cock’, ‘male bird or fowl’ (Old English cocc), given for a variety of possible reasons. Applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock, it soon became a generic term for a youth and was attached with hypocoristic force to the short forms of many medieval personal names (e.g. Alcock, Hancock, Hiscock, Mycock)... [more]
COCUZZAItalian
From cocuzza "gourd", "pumpkin", applied either as an occupational name for a grower or seller of gourds or a nickname for a rotund individual.
CODEYIrish
Based off of the given name Cody
CODREANURomanian, Moldovan
A common surname in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
COEEnglish
English (Essex and Suffolk): nickname from the jackdaw, Middle English co, Old English ca (see Kay). The jackdaw is noted for its sleek black color, raucous voice, and thievish nature, and any of these attributes could readily have given rise to the nickname.
COENSMedieval German
Variation of Coen. A diminutive of Konrad/Conrad, an old German Emperor's name (compare its Dutch form 'Coenraad'). The surname, thus, means "of, from, or belonging to Conrad/Konrad". The name Conrad comes from the Old High German word Kuonrat, meaning literally "bold in counsel".... [more]
COERSGerman, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
COFFEEIrish
Variant of Coffey.
COFFEYIrish
Ireland County Cork
COGGESHALL?
Usually used to keep the mothers maiden name in the family.
COILLIrish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COITMedieval Welsh French English
The surname Coit was first found in Carnarvonshire, a former country in Northwest Wales, anciently part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, and currently is divided between the unitary authorities of Gwynedd and Conwy, where they held a family seat... [more]
COITOMedieval Italian (Tuscan, Latinized, ?)
That means a wedding or the nuptials.
COJUANGCOFilipino
Hispanicized form of Xu
COKAYNEEnglish
Medieval English nickname which meant "idle dreamer" from Cockaigne, the name of an imaginary land of luxury and idleness in medieval myth. The place may derive its name from Old French (pays de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty", ultimately from the Low German word kokenje, a diminutive of koke "cake" (since the houses in Cockaigne are made of cake).
COLDENEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLELLAItalian
diminutive of personal name Cola, a short form of Nicola, an Italian equivalent of Nicholas... [more]
COLESEnglish, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
COLEYEnglish
With variant Colley can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas.
COLFAXEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone with dark or black hair, from Old English cola "charcoal" and feax "hair".
COLLABRUSCOItalian
From the region Calabria in southern Italy; widely moved to US.
COLLARDEnglish, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLETFrench
From a pet form of Colle.
COLLEYEnglish
With variant Coley, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
COLLIEREnglish
This name is derived from Middle English cole, from Old English col meaning "coal", combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a burner, gatherer or seller of coal.
COLLINESFrench
French for "hillbanks".
COLLINSWORTHEnglish
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
COLLISEnglish
A variant of Collins, itself a patronymic of given names Collin or Colin, both ultimately nicknames for Nicholas.
COLLUMNorthern Irish
Reduced form of northern Irish McCollum.
COLMENARESSpanish
It literally means "apiaries", denoting someone who either worked at some or lived near some.
COLOItalian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
COLOMBRESAsturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish in Ribadeva.
COLONELAmerican
From a French word for a military rank of an officer who led a column of regimental soldiers. Could be a nickname for someone with a military bearing or demeanor.
COLTRANEIrish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coltaráin.
COMBEFERRELiterature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COMEAUFrench, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUXFrench (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French Comeau.
COMIMItalian
It mans waiter in italian.
COMINEROMedieval Spanish (Latinized, Rare)
Means "gatherer of cumin" from the spanisgh word "comino".
COMMANDERAnglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
COMMEGNOFriulian
Imaginative, wealth, adventurer
COMPTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
CONAHANIrish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham).
CONATSEREnglish (Anglicized)
A variant of the German last name Konitzer.
CONDONIrish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton. This seems to have been imported from Wales, but probably derives ultimately from Caunton in Nottinghamshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Caluno{dh} (composed of the elements calu "bald" + no{dh} "daring") + Old English tun "enclosure", "settlement".
CONEIrish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONEYEnglish
Means "seller of rabbits", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rabbit (in either case from Middle English cony "rabbit").
CONG TANG TON NUVietnamese
Often written with the middle two words uncapitalized when with a full name; example: Con tang ton Nu Hue Hue. The first name is Hue Hue, and the surname is Cong tang ton Nu. It is a female royal Vietnamese surname created by the NGUYEN Dynasty.
CONKLINIrish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
CONLONIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONNICKYiddish
Variation on Koenig.
CONQUESTEnglish
Probably from a medieval nickname, perhaps applied to a domineering person. This surname is borne by the British poet, historian and critic Robert Conquest (1917-).
CONRADGerman
Americanized spelling of KONRAD.
CONRADIGerman, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name Konrad.
CONRANIrish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROYIrish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONSIGLIOItalian
Meaning "Counselor" or "One who gives good advice".
CONTEItalian
Italian: from the title of rank conte ‘count’ (from Latin comes, genitive comitis ‘companion’). Probably in this sense (and the Late Latin sense of ‘traveling companion’), it was a medieval personal name; as a title it was no doubt applied ironically as a nickname for someone with airs and graces or simply for someone who worked in the service of a count.
CONTINOItalian
Diminutive of Italian Conte or Conti.
CONTRACTORIndian (Parsi)
Parsi occupational surname for a contractor, or someone who works on the basis of a contract. As the British rule of India demanded for all Parsees to adopt a surname, many adopted English vocabulary based on their occupation (i.e. Engineer or Merchant).
CONTRERASSpanish
Habitual name for someone from Conteraras, a region in the province of Burgos, Spain. The name "Conteraras" is derived from Late Latin contraria meaning "surrounding area", "region", from contra meaning "opposite, against, hard by".
CONWAYWelsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGANIrish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLANIrish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of Coghlan.
COOLEYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
COOLIDGEEnglish
Probably an occupational name for a college servant or someone with some other association with a university college, for example a tenant farmer who farmed one of the many farms in England known as College Farm, most of which are or were owned by university colleges.
COONRODDutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
COOTEREnglish
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of Cotter, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
COPELANDEnglish
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
COPPENHAVERGerman
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
COPPOLAItalian
Coppola is an occupational name for someone who makes 'coppolas', which are a type of hat. The word 'coppola' literally means 'hat' in Neapolitan dialect. The name also could have been for someone who frequently wore a coppola too.... [more]
COPUSEnglish
For full analysis of the origin for the name Copus/Copas I would refer you to my family website copusfamily.co.uk
CORBALÁNAragonese
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
CORBEDDUSardinian
Means "son of Corbu" in Sardinian.
CORBETTEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORDNorthern Irish
Reduced form of McCord.
CORDASCOItalian
From the given name Corda or Cordio (a short form of Accord(i)o, literally "agreement") + the suffix -asco denoting kinship.
CORDAYFrench
Either from the French word corde meaning "cord/rope/string", or from the Latin word cor meaning "heart." This was the surname of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who killed Jacobin leader Jean-Paul Marat during the French revolution.
CORDERFrench (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
CÓRDOBASpanish
Indicates someone who was originally from the city of Córdoba (Cordova) in Andalusia, Spain. The name itself is derived from Phonecian Qʾrtuba meaning "Juba’s city", itself from Phonecian qʾrt meaning "city" and juba referring to King Juba I of Numidia.
CORDOVEIRUAsturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Pravia.
CORDRAYEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a proud man (from Old French cuer de roi "heart of a king").
CORDSGerman
Derived from the first name Konrad.
COREEnglish (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
CORIOItalian
Variant of COIRO.
CORKEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for a supplier of red or purple dye or for a dyer of cloth, Middle English cork (of Celtic origin; compare Corkery).
CORKEEnglish
Variant of Cork.
CORKERYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORLETTManx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
ĆORLUKACroatian
Derived from Turkish körlük, meaning "blindness".... [more]
CORMICANScottish
From a pet form of the Gaelic personal name Cormac (see McCormick).
CORMIERFrench
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
CORNISHCeltic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALLCeltic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALLISScottish
Example: Lord Charles Cornwallis.
CORNWELLEnglish
Habitational name from Cornwell in Oxfordshire, named from Old English corn, a metathesized form of cron, cran ‘crane’ + well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’.variant of Cornwall.
CORPUSAnglo-Saxon
It was a name given to a dark-haired person. In Yorkshire and Suffolk, the surname Corpus is derived from the Old Norse word korpr, which means raven; in Oxfordshire, the surname is derived from the Old French word corp, which has the same meaning.
CORRIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
CORRADOItalian
From the personal name CORRADO.
CORRALESSpanish
denoting someone who worked on a barn or a farm . Corral means "barnyard", "corral", "yard" ,"sheepshed"
CORRAOItalian
Reduced form CORRADO.
CORREAPortuguese, Spanish
From Spanish, meaning "leather garment."
CORREIAPortuguese
meaning "leather strap" or "belt", "rein", or "shoelace"; denoting a person who worked with leather products
CORRIEEnglish
Habitational name from places in Arran, Dumfries, and elsewhere, named Corrie, from Gaelic coire "cauldron", applied to a circular hanging valley on a mountain.
CORRIEScottish
Scottish spelling of MCCORRY.
CORRIGANEnglish
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
CORSIItalian
Patronymic or plural form of CORSO.
CORSONEnglish
Nickname from Old French 'corson', a diminutive of curt ‘short’
CORTPolish, Russian, Jewish
Derived from the surname "Kutalczuk", "Kotelchik", "Cuttlechuck", or "Kuttlechuck"
CORTÉSSpanish
From Old French corteis, curteis which means "courteous, polite". It could also serve as a habitual surname for people from Cortes in Spain or Portugal.
CORTÈSCatalan
Catalan form of Cortés.
CORTÊSPortuguese
Portuguese form of Cortés.
CORTRIGHTEnglish
Habitational surname from the Dutch Kortrijk for a person from a place of this name in Flanders. Perhaps also a respelling of English Cartwright.
CORVINUSHungarian
dirived from Corvin, maning raven.
COSCAItalian
Topographic name from the Calabrian dialect word c(u)oscu "oak", also "wood".
COSCOItalian
Masculinized form of COSCA.
COSCOLLOLACatalan
This indicates familial origin within or within the vicinity of the eponymous farmhouse in the municipality of Lladurs.
COSGROVEEnglish
Habitational name from Cosgrove in Northamptonshire, named with an Old English personal name Cof + Old English graf "grove", "thicket".
COSGROVEIrish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."