Submitted Surnames Starting with C

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Costache Romanian
From the given name Costache
Costantino Italian
From the given name Costantino
Costello Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oisdealbhaigh meaning "son of Oisdealbhach". The given name Oisdealbhach is derived from Irish os meaning "deer, fawn" and dealbhach meaning "resembling, shapely".
Coster English
Metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of costards (Anglo-Norman French, from coste 'rib'), a variety of large apples, so called for their prominent ribs.
Costiniu Romanian
Meaning unknown.
Cotoni Italian
means "cottons" in Italian
Cotter English
"A cottage dweller", a name in the feudal system for a serf allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
Cotter Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oitir "son of Oitir", a personal name borrowed from Old Norse Óttarr, composed of the elements ótti "fear, dread" and herr "army".
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottonwood English
The name of a person who lived among cottonwood trees.
Cottrant French
Meaning unknown.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Coulibaly Western African, Manding
Francization of Bambara kulu bari meaning "without a canoe", referring to someone who crossed a river or another body of water without the use of a canoe.
Coullson Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic MacCumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
Coulson English
Means "son of Cole".
Council English
1 English: nickname for a wise or thoughtful man, from Anglo-Norman French counseil ‘consultation’, ‘deliberation’, also ‘counsel’, ‘advice’ (Latin consilium, from consulere ‘to consult’)... [more]
Courcel French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
Courcelles French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
Courfeyrac Literature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courtier French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
Courville French
Derived from either of two communes in the departments of Marne and Eure-et-Loir in France. It is named with Latin curba villa, denoting a settlement in the curve of a road.
Cousin Maltese
(Definitely doesn't come from the word meaning " a child of one's uncle or aunt".
Cousins French
"Relative" in Old French.
Cousland Scottish
Of local origin from Cousland in the parish of Cranston, Midlothian.
Couter English
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
Coutinho Portuguese
Diminutive of Couto.
Cova Catalan, Galician
Topographic name from Catalan and Galician cova ‘cave’, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, in the provinces of Lugo, Ourense, Pontevedra, Catalonia and Valencia.
Coventry English
habitational name from the city of Coventry in the West Midlands, which is probably named with the genitive case of an Old English personal name Cofa (compare Coveney) + Old English treow 'tree'.
Coverdale English (British)
From the valley (Dale) of the river Cover.... [more]
Covert English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
Covey Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
Cowan Scottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized)
This surname, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin... [more]
Coward English
several origins... [more]
Cowdell English (British)
Cowdell is derived from a geographical locality. 'of Coldwell' (v. Caldwell), a township in the union of Bellingham, Northumberland Also of Colwell, a township in the union of Hexham, same county.
Cowell English (British)
Means "son of Nicholas. A famous bearer is British talent manager Simon Cowell (1959-).
Cowen Scottish, English (British)
Scottish and northern English: variant spelling of Cowan.
Cowie Scottish
habitational name from any of several places, especially one near Stirling, named Cowie, probably from Gaelic colldha, an adjective from coll ‘hazel’
Coy Irish
Reduced form of McCoy.
Coyle Irish
Irish reduced variant of Mccool.
Cozzolino Italian
Diminutive of Cozzo.
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Crabbe English, Literature, Popular Culture
The character 'Vincent Crabbe' has this surname in the Harry Potter series.
Crăciun Romanian
Crăciun is the Romanian word for Christmas.
Craft English (American)
Variant of Croft and Americanized spelling of Kraft.
Cragg Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
Cram English
From the the Scottish place name Crambeth (now Crombie), a village and ancient parish in Torryburn, Fife.
Cramer German, English
Variant of German surname Krämer.
Cran Anglo-Saxon
This picturesque name is of Anglo Saxon origin and is a nickname surname given to a tall thin man, or someone with long legs, or some other fancied resemblance to the bird. The derivation is from the old English "cran(uc)", "cron(uc)", "cren(uc)", which means a crane and until the introduction of a separate word in the 14th Century also a heron... [more]
Crandall Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Raonuill "son of Raonull".
Crane English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
Cranford English
English: habitational name from any of several places, for example in the county of Middlesex (now part of Greater London) and Northamptonshire (Cranford St. Andrew and Cranford St. John), named with Old English cran ‘crane’ + ford ‘ford’.
Cranley Irish
The surname Cranley was first found in Ulster (Irish: Ulaidh), where they held a family seat but were also to be found in County Offaly and Galway. The sept is styled the Princes of Crich Cualgne and are descended from Cu-Ulladh, a Prince in 576.
Cranshaw English
From Cranshaw in Lancashire, named from Old English cran(uc) ‘crane’ + sceaga ‘grove’, ‘thicket’.
Cranston Scottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
Crashman American
Surnames of fictional characters Carl and Chloe Crashman from Carl².
Cratchit Literature
Bob Cratchit is a fictional character in Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" novella. Bob Cratchit works for Ebenezer Scrooge as an underpaid clerk.
Crauwels Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
Craven Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
Cravotta Sicilian
From a Sicilian immigrant to America, Cravotta was changed to Cravatta upon arrival at Ellis Island. The name means "bowtie."
Craw English, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
Crawfordjohn Medieval Scottish
One who came from Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire; not to be confused with nearby Crawford, also in Lanarkshire.
Crawley English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley... [more]
Cream English
An occupational name for a seller of dairy products.
Creamer English
Derived from Middle English and Old French creme "cream". This was an occupational name for a seller of dairy products.
Creangă Romanian, Moldovan
A Surname commonly used in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
Creek English
"Creek".
Creel Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
Creepingbear Indigenous American, Arapaho (?)
From the English words creeping and bear.
Creese English
This most interesting surname has two possible origins. Firstly it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English "creas", Middle English "crease", meaning "fine or elegant", which was a nickname given to an elegant person or one who dressed in fine or elegant clothes... [more]
Creig Scottish, English
Derived from Scottish Gaelic crioch "border".
Creighton English
From Irish 'crioch' meaning "border", and Old English 'tun' meaning "town".
Crema Italian, German
From the italian city "Crema"
Creme English
Variant spelling of Cream.
Crenshaw English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
Crepeau French
From the Latin word, crispus, meaning "curly hair".
Crescencio Spanish
From the given name Crescencio
Crescenzo Italian
From the given name Crescenzo
Crespin American (Hispanic)
A Last name originating from Colonial New Mexico. It is derived from the last name Crespi
Cress German, Jewish, Belarusian
A variant of the German surname Kress. From the Middle High German "kresse" meaning "gudgeon" (a type of fish) or the Old High German "krassig", meaning "greedy". Can also be from an altered form of the names Erasmus or Christian, or the Latin spelling of the Cyrillic "КРЕСС".
Crete French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
Creus Spanish
Variant of Cruz. Famous bearer of this surname is Spanish footballer Xavi Hernández.
Criado Portuguese, Spanish
Occupational name from criado ‘servant’.
Cribbs English (Rare)
Unknown origin. Likely either from the Old English given name Crispin, which derives from a Latin nickname meaning "curly-haired", or from the place Cribbis near Lauder, England.
Crichton English, Scottish
Variant of Creighton. It could also in some cases be an anglicized form of Dutch Kruchten.
Cricks American
"living near a river." Comes from a similar origin of Rios
Crider German
Americanized spelling of German Kreider.
Crisologo Spanish (Philippines)
Transferred use of the given name Crisologo 2.
Crispen English
Variant spelling of Crispin.
Crispin English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name Crispin.
Crist English
Applied to someone who played the part of christ in a pageant
Cristales Central American, Filipino, Spanish (Mexican, Rare), South American (Rare)
Plural form of Spanish cristal meaning "crystal."... [more]
Cristiano Italian
From the given name Cristiano.
Cristóbal Spanish
From the given name Cristóbal.
Cristobal Spanish (Philippines)
Unaccented form of Cristóbal primarily used in the Philippines.
Cristoforo Italian
From the given name Cristoforo.
Crivelli Italian
From the Italian crivello, which is derived from the Latin cribrum, meaning "sieve," (a mesh food strainer); likely an occupational name for a maker or user of sieves.
Crnjac Croatian
Derived from crn, meaning "black".
Crnković Croatian
Derived from crn "black". The name refers to a person who was dark-skinned, or a person from the region Crna Gora "Black Mountain" (modern-day Montenegro).
Croak English
Variant of Croke
Croake English
Variant of Croak
Croaker English
Meant "person from Crèvecoeur", the name of various places in northern France ("heartbreak", an allusion to the poverty of the local soil).
Croan Irish
Variant of Croghan.
Crock English
Meaning "barrel," signifying one who made or worked with barrels.
Crockett English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
Crockett Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Riocaird "son of Richard".
Crofter English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
Croghan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’... [more]
Croke English
Derived from the Irish name Cróc or the Norse name Krókr
Crompton English
Derived from the Old English word "Crometun"
Cromwell English
Habitational name from places in Nottinghamshire and West Yorkshire named Cromwell, from Old English crumb "bent, crooked" and well(a) "spring, stream".
Cronine Irish
Variant of Cronin
Crook Scottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
Crooks English
Patrynomic for Crook.
Crossan Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’... [more]
Crossley English
From the word cross, of Latin origin, and leah "woodland, clearing". Indicated that the bearer lived by a cross in a clearing
Crosthwaite English
Means the clering of the cross
Crough English
Variant of Croke
Crow English
From Middle English crow, Old English crawa, applied as a nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion or for someone thought to resemble the bird in some other way.
Crowcroft English
From the village in England, Crowcroft
Crowe English
Variant of Crow.
Crowley Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
Crowner English
Means "coroner" (from Anglo-Norman corouner "coroner", a derivative of Old French coroune "crown").
Crownover German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of German Kronauer, denoting someone from Kronau, a town near Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It could also be an Americanised form of Kronhöfer (a variant of Grünhofer), a habitational name for someone from a lost place called Grünhof, derived from Middle High German gruene meaning "green" or kranech meaning "crane" and hof meaning "farmstead".
Crowther English
Originally meant "person who plays the crowd (an ancient Celtic stringed instrument)". It was borne by British entertainer Leslie Crowther (1933-1996).
Croy Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
Croy Scottish
Means "person from Croy", the name of various places in Scotland.
Crozier English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
Cruikshank Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for someone with a crooked leg (from Scots cruik "bent" + shank "leg"). This was the surname of British caricaturist George Cruikshank (1792-1872) and British actor Andrew Cruikshank (1907-1988).
Cruise English
Variant of Cruse, which is the Americanized spelling of Kruse.
Crumb English
From the English word "crumb".
Crump English
Originally a nickname for a crippled or deformed person, from Middle English cromp, crump meaning "bent, crooked, stooping" (from Old English crumb).
Crusoe English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
Cruzan Dutch
Americanized spelling of Cruyssen.
Csepregi Hungarian
Someone from the district of Csepreg in Hungary
Cua Catalan
Nickname from Catalan cua meaning "tail".
Cuadra Asturian
Asturian-Leonese: probably a habitational name from a place in Asturies called Cuadra.
Cuadrado Spanish
A nickname for a thick man.
Cuadro Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
Cuaresma Spanish
It means "Lent".
Cuarto Italian
Italian:... [more]
Cuautli Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl quauhtli meaning "eagle".
Cuaya Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Grau.
Cuba Portuguese, Asturian-Leonese, Galician, Spanish
habitational name from any of the places in Portugal (in the provinces of Alentejo and Beira Baixa) or Spain (in Aragon, Asturies, and Galicia) named Cuba, from cuba ‘barrel’ (from Latin cupa)... [more]
Cucolo Italian, Austrian, Judeo-Italian
Used in Austria, and in southern regions of Italy.
Cuda Slovak
Derives from the word name derives from cuda meaning "miracle".
Cudak Polish
Means "oddity, crank" in Polish. It can also come from the word cud meaning "miracle, wonder".
Cuddihy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of Cuidightheach".
Cuello Spanish
From Spanish meaning "neck". Could be a nickname for a person with a stiff neck.
Cuenca Spanish
Cuenca is an ancient Spanish last name which originated from Cuenca, a city in the Kingdom of Castilla.... [more]
Cuerden English
Derived from a geographical locality. 'of Cuerden,' a township in the parish of Leyland, Lancashire.
Cuervo Spanish
Means "raven, crow" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin corvus. From a nickname for a man with strikingly glossy black hair or with a raucous voice. Alternatively, a habitational name from places containing this word (e.g. El Cuervo, Teruel).
Cuff English
From the english word "cuff"
Cugini Italian (Rare)
Means "cousins" in Italian.
Cui Chinese
From Chinese 崔 (cuī) referring to a place called Cui that existed in what is now Shandong province.
Cuizon Filipino
From Hokkien 貴孫 (kuì sun) meaning "expensive grandchild" or "precious grandchild".
Ćuk Serbian, Croatian
Derived from ćuk (ћук), meaning "scops owl".
Culbert Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
Culbertson English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
Culindris Cantabrian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
Culkin Irish
Reduced anglicization of Irish Gaelic Mac Uilcín meaning "descendant of Uilcín", a diminutive of Ulick, itself an Irish diminutive of William.
Cullimore English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
Cully English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
Culpeper English
Variant of Culpepper. Known bearers of this surname include: Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1664), an English herbalist, physician and astrologer; and English colonial administrator Thomas Culpeper, 2nd Baron Culpeper (1635-1689), governor of Virginia 1680-1683... [more]
Culpepper English
Means "person who collects, prepares and/or sells herbs and spices" (from Middle English cullen "to pick" + pepper).
Culver English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Cumani Albanian
Meaning unknown.
Cumba Gaulish
A topographic name from Gaulish cumba meaning "narrow valley" or a habitational name for a village associated with this name (see Coombe).
Cumberbatch English
Name for someone from Comberbach in North Cheshire. May come from etymological elements meaning "stream in a valley."
Cumberland English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
Cumming Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
Cunanan Filipino, Pampangan
Meaning uncertain, of Kapampangan origin.
Cundall English
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
Cung Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (Gōng) meaning "General", "Total".
Cunha Portuguese
Habitational name from any of numerous locations named Cunha, probably named from Portuguese cunha meaning "wedge" or Galician cuinha meaning "hill".