Submitted Surnames Starting with C

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CRAUWELS     Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
CRAVEN     Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
CRAVOTTA     Sicilian
From a Sicilian immigrant to America, Cravotta was changed to Cravatta upon arrival at Ellis Island. The name means "bowtie."
CRAW     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
CRAWFORDJOHN     Medieval Scottish
One who came from Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire; not to be confused with nearby Crawford, also in Lanarkshire.
CRAWLEY     English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley. ... [more]
CREANGĂ     Romanian, Moldovan
A Surname commonly used in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
CREEL     Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
CREEPINGBEAR     English (American, Rare)
Possibly taken from the English words creeping and bear.
CREESE     English
This most interesting surname has two possible origins. Firstly it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English "creas", Middle English "crease", meaning "fine or elegant", which was a nickname given to an elegant person or one who dressed in fine or elegant clothes... [more]
CREMA     Italian, German
From the italian city "Crema"
CRENSHAW     English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
CRESS     German, Jewish, Belarusian
The maiden name of my Great Grandmother.... [more]
CRETE     French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
CREUS     Spanish
Variant of Cruz. Famous bearer of this surname is Spanish footballer Xavi Hernández.
CRIADO     Portuguese, Spanish
Occupational name from criado ‘servant’.
CRICKS     American
"living near a river." Comes from a similar origin of Rios
CRIPPEN     English
Variant of CRISPIN.
CRISPEN     English
Variant spelling of CRISPIN.
CRISPIN     English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name CRISPIN.
CRISTIANO     Italian
From the given name Cristiano.
CRNKOVIĆ     Croatian
Derived from crn "black". The name refers to a person who was dark-skinned, or a person from the region Crna Gora "Black Mountain" (modern-day Montenegro).
CROAKER     English
Meant "person from Crèvecoeur", the name of various places in northern France ("heartbreak", an allusion to the poverty of the local soil).
CROAN     Irish
Variant of Croghan.
CROCK     English
Meaning "barrel," signifying one who made or worked with barrels.
CROCKETT     English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
CROCKETT     Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Riocaird "son of RICHARD".
CROFTER     English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
CROGHAN     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’. Croghan in county Roscommon was the ancient royal site of the province of Connacht.
CRONIN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cróinín.
CROOK     Scottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
CROOKS     English
Patrynomic for Crook.
CROSSAN     Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’. Sometimes translated as 'bard' or 'storyteller.'
CROSTHWAITE     English
Means the clering of the cross
CROW     English
From Middle English crow, Old English crawa, applied as a nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion or for someone thought to resemble the bird in some other way.
CROWLEY     Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
CROWNER     English
Means "coroner" (from Anglo-Norman corouner "coroner", a derivative of Old French coroune "crown").
CROWTHER     English
Originally meant "person who plays the crowd (an ancient Celtic stringed instrument)". It was borne by British entertainer Leslie Crowther (1933-1996).
CROY     Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
CROY     Scottish
Means "person from Croy", the name of various places in Scotland.
CROZIER     English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
CRUCHAGA     Basque (Castilianized)
Castilianized form of Krutxaga.
CRUIKSHANK     Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for someone with a crooked leg (from Scots cruik "bent" + shank "leg"). This was the surname of British caricaturist George Cruikshank (1792-1872) and British actor Andrew Cruikshank (1907-1988).
CRUMB     English
From the English word "crumb".
CRUMP     English, Welsh, Anglo-Norman
"Crooked or deformed person" in Old English. An ancient Worcestershire surname.
CRUSOE     English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
CRUZAN     Dutch
Americanized spelling of CRUYSSEN.
CUA     Catalan
Nickname from Catalan cua meaning "tail".
CUADRO     Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
CUAYA     Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Grau.
CUBA     Portugese, Asturian-Leonese, Galician, Spanish
habitational name from any of the places in Portugal (in the provinces of Alentejo and Beira Baixa) or Spain (in Aragon, Asturies, and Galicia) named Cuba, from cuba ‘barrel’ (from Latin cupa)... [more]
CUDA     Slovak
Derives from the word name derives from cuda meaning "miracle".
CUDAHY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cuidighthigh.
CUDDIHY     Ancient Irish (Rare)
Ó’Cuidighthigh means descendant or grandson of the helpful one
CUENCA     Spanish
Cuenca is an ancient Spanish last name which originated from Cuenca, a city in the Kingdom of Castilla.... [more]
CUGINI     Italian (Rare)
Means "cousins" in Italian.
CULBERT     Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULBERTSON     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
CULLIMORE     English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
CULLY     English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
CULPEPER     English
Variant of Culpepper. Known bearers of this surname include: Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1664), an English herbalist, physician and astrologer; and English colonial administrator Thomas Culpeper, 2nd Baron Culpeper (1635-1689), governor of Virginia 1680-1683... [more]
CULPEPPER     English
Means "person who collects, prepares and/or sells herbs and spices" (from Middle English cullen "to pick" + pepper).
CULVER     English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
CULVÉRT     French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMANI     Albanian
Meaning unknown.
CUMBERBATCH     English
Name for someone from Comberbach in North Cheshire. May come from etymological elements meaning "stream in a valley."
CUMBERLAND     English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
CUMMING     Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUMMINGS     Irish
Variant of CUMMING
CUNDALL     English
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
CUNHA     Portuguese (Brazilian)
This name can mean either mean that your upper class or a coin maker. Cunha directly translates to "coin" or "wedge"
CUNLIFFE     English
Originally meant "person from Cunliffe", Lancashire ("slope with a crevice" (literally "cunt-cliff")).
CUNNIFF     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
CUNNINGTON     English (American)
Scottish linked to {Marshall}
CUOMO     Italian
Probably from a shortened form of Cuosëmo, a Neapolitan variant of the Italian male personal name Cosimo.
CURMI     Maltese
(Warning: Whatever you do, don't look up the coat of arms, if you're squeamish. Take me seriously.)
CURNIANA     Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Salas.
CUROVICH     ?
Possible other spelling Curovic. Great Grandfather born in Austria, but name traces back to Croatia possibly.
CURPHEY     Manx
Sea warror from the Viking
CURRENT     Irish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
CURRIE     Scottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
CURRY     Irish, Scottish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Comhraidhe, ‘descendant of Comhraidhe’, a personal name of uncertain meaning.... [more]
CURTIN     Irish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see McCurtain). ... [more]
CURUTCHET     Basque
Variation of GURUTZETA
CUSTER     German (Anglicized)
Anglicization of the German surname Köster or Küster, literally "sexton". A famous bearer was George Custer (1839-1876), the American cavalry general. General Custer and his army were defeated and killed by Sioux and Cheyenne forces under Sitting Bull in the Battle of Little Bighorn (1876; also known colloquially as Custer's Last Stand).
CUSTOVIC     Bosnian
Justo
CUTHBERT     English
Derived from the name CUTHBERT
CUTHBERTSON     English, Scottish
Patronymic surname from the personal name Cuthbert.
CUTLER     English
Means "maker of swords & knives."
CUYLER     Dutch
Variant of Koole or Kuilart.
CVETANOV     Bulgarian
Variant spelling of Tsvetanov.
CVETKOVIĆ     Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of Cvetko".
CVIJANOVIĆ     Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of Cvijan".
ĆWIKLIŃSKI     Polish
This indicates familial origin within either of 2 Masovian villages in Gmina Płońsk: Ćwiklinek or Ćwiklin.
CWYNAR     Polish
Polonized form of the German surname Zwirner, an occupational name for a yarn or twine maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zwirn ‘twine’, ‘yarn’
CYGAN     Polish
Ethnic name or nickname from a word meaning ‘gypsy’, ‘Romany’.Altered spelling of eastern German Zigan, from Hungarian cigány ‘gypsy’.
CYPHER     German (Anglicized, Rare)
Fanciful Americanized spelling of German Seifer.
CYPRESS     English
Translation of German Zypress, a topographic name for someone living near a cypress tree or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a cypress, Middle High German zipres(se) (from Italian cipressa, Latin cupressus), or possibly of any of various Greek family names derived from kyparissos ‘cypress’, as for example Kyparissis, Kyparissos, Kyparissiadis, etc.
CYPRIAN     English
Possibly an altered spelling of French Cyprien, from a medieval personal name, from Latin Cyprianus (originally an ethnic name for an inhabitant of Cyprus), or a shortened form of Greek Kyprianos, Kyprianis, Kyprianidis, ethnic names for an inhabitant of Cyprus (Greek Kypros), or patronymics from the personal name Kyprianos (of the same derivation)... [more]
CYRUS     English
From the given name CYRUS. A notable bearer is American singer and songwriter, Miley Cyrus (1992-).
CYWIŃSKI     Polish
Habitational name, possibly for someone from Cywiny in Ciechanów province.
CZARNIECKI     Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Czarnca.
CZARNY     Polish
From the Polish czarny meaning "black", a cognate of Černý.
CZECH     Czech, Polish
Czech means "Czech man".
CZELUSNIAK     Czech
Jewish, Polish
CZESKY     Czech, Polish
Czesky means "bohemian" in Polish.
CZESLAWOWICZ     Polish
Patronymic from the given name Czeslaw.
CZICAGIA     Polish
Habitational name meaning someone who is from Chicago.
CZUBIŃSKI     Polish
This denotes that someone’s family originated in the Masovian village of Czubin.
CZYŻEWSKI     Polish
habitational name for someone from any of the many places in Poland called Czyżew or Czyżewo, from czyż(yk) ‘siskin’.
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