Submitted Surnames Starting with C

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CIMINELLI Italian
Diminutive of CIMINO
CIMINELLO Italian
Diminutive of CIMINO
CIMINO Italian
Occupational name for a spice dealer, from cimino "cumin", Sicilian ciminu.
ÇINAR Turkish
Means "plane tree" in Turkish (genus Platanus), derived from Persian چنار (chenar).
CINARDO Italian
From Italy
CINCO Filipino
From a Hispanicised form of the Hokkien surname GO.
CINFUEGOS Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Quirós.
CINGESWELL English
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CINNAMOND Scottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CINTRON Spanish
Spanish form for the french "Citroen". Original from Puerto Rico.
CINWELL English
Meaning "Lives at the King's spring"
CIOCCA Italian
The origin has to do with hair
CIORA Romanian (Rare)
Derived from a Romanian place name.
CIRCELLI Sicilian
Derived from Sicilian circedda meaning "(hoop) earring", originally used to denote someone who wore hoop earrings.
CIRIA Spanish
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous Castilian municipality.
CIRUJANO Spanish, Filipino
Means "surgeon" in Spanish, used for someone who was a surgeon by profession.
CĪRULIS Latvian
Means "lark".
CISSÉ Western African, Manding (Francized)
Variant of CEESAY used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
CITARELLA Neapolitan
Occupational name for someone who made or played a guitar, derived from chitarra or catarra "guitar".
CITRINE Jewish
An invented Jewish name based on Yiddish tsitrin "lemon tree".
CIUBOTARU Romanian
Means "boot maker" in Romanian, the one that makes boots ("ciubota" (singular), regionalism for "cizma"/"gheata"). Not the same with "shoe maker" (or "Schumacher" in German) as the Romanian "Ciubotar" refers strictly to boots and not all kinds of shoes.
CIURARU Romanian
Ciuraru is a Romanian surname, derived from the Romanian word ,,cioară" who is mean ,,crow"
CLAASSEN German
The name Claassen means "son of Klaus." It's primarily German, but it's also Dutch and Danish.
CLAESON English
Means "Son of CLAES". Possibly an English phonetic elaboration of CLAYTON, but also a Swedish variant of CLAESSON.
CLAINE Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Gille Eathain, a patronymic name meaning "son of the servant of Saint John."
CLAIR French
From the given name CLAIR.
CLAIRMONT English
Means "bright hill."
CLARENCE English
From the given name CLARENCE.
CLAREY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó CLÉIRIGH and variant of O'CLERY and CLEARY.
CLARKS English
Variant of CLARK.
CLARY Irish
Variant of CLEARY
CLATTENBURG English (?)
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
CLAUDE French
From the first name CLAUDE.
CLAUDEL French
From the given name CLAUDEL.
CLAVEL Spanish
Metonymic occupational name for a spice trader or a nail maker, derived from Spanish clavel or Catalan clavell meaning "nail", later also "clove", itself a derivative of Latin clavellus "nail".
CLAVEL French
Metonymic occupational name for a nail maker, ultimately from Latin clavellus "nail", but in some cases possibly from the same word in the sense "smallpox, rash". A fictional bearer is Miss Clavel, a nun and teacher in Ludwig Bemelmans's 'Madeline' series of children's books (introduced in 1939).
CLAVELL French
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
CLAW English
The surname Claw is a very rare English surname.
CLAYBERG English
Meaning is unknown, but it most likely means "clay mountain", from surnames CLAY "clay" and BERG "mountain".
CLEAVE English
From an English topographical name meaning "cliff".
CLEAVELAND English
Spelling variant of CLEVELAND.
CLEBSCH Ancient Germanic
Means "baker" in Old Prussian.
CLEBURNE English
Cleburne is a surname of Northern English and Southern Scottish Anglo-Saxon origin.
CLELAND Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of MCCLELLAND. ... [more]
CLELLAND Scots, Irish
Scottish and Irish topographical name meaning "clay land".
CLEM English, Dutch
From the given name CLEM.
CLEMENCEAU French
Probably derived from the French given name CLÉMENT. A famous bearer was Georges Clemenceau (1841-1929), who was the 54th Prime Minister of France during the First World War.
CLEMENTS English
Means "son of CLEMENT".
CLEMMONS English
Derived from the Latin first name CLEMENT, Clemmons means "merciful".
CLEMO English
From a Cornish form of the personal name CLEMENT.
CLEMSON English
Means "son of CLEM".
CLERIHEW Scottish
A Scottish surname of unknown origin and meaning. A clerihew is a humorous or satirical verse consisting of two rhyming couplets in lines of irregular metre about someone who is named in the poem. It was invented by the British author Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956; Clerihew was his mother's maiden name)... [more]
CLERK English
Variant spelling of CLARK.
CLEVELAND English
English regional name from the district around Middlesbrough named Cleveland ‘the land of the cliffs’, from the genitive plural (clifa) of Old English clif ‘bank’, ‘slope’ + land ‘land’... [more]
CLEVELAND Norwegian (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Norwegian Kleiveland or Kleveland, habitational names from any of five farmsteads in Agder and Vestlandet named with Old Norse kleif "rocky ascent" or klefi "closet" (an allusion to a hollow land formation) and land "land".
CLEVENGER English, Anglo-Saxon
The surname is derived from the Old English word cleofan which means to cleave or split.
CLEVERLEY English
Probably means "person from Cleveley", Lancashire ("woodland clearing by a cliff").
CLEVERLY English
From a nickname for an intelligent or quick-witted person.
CLINGER English (American)
Americanized spelling of German KLINGER.Possibly a variant of CLINKER. an English occupational name for a maker or fixer of bolts and rivets.
CLINKENBEARD Low German
Possibly an Americanized form of North German Klingebiel, a variant of KLINGBEIL.
CLINKER English (British, ?)
Possibly a varient of CLINGER.
CLIVE English
English surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
CLOONEY English, Irish
From Gaelic Ó Cluanaigh meaning "descendant of Cluanach". Cluanach was a given name derived from Irish clauna "deceitful, flattering, rogue".
CLOPTON English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Essex, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, named Clopton from Old English clopp(a) meaning "rock", "hill" + tūn meaning "settlement".
CLORE English (American)
Americanized spelling of German KLOR (from a short form of the medieval personal name Hilarius (see Hillary) or Klar).
CLORES Spanish, Portuguese
Portuguese form of FLORES
CLOSSON Scottish
this name is of the noble family in Orkney islands known as the closson whom came to Orkney with the viking raiders in the early 900's and they founded the noble house of closson there of
CLOUD English
Topographic name for someone who lived near an outcrop or hill, from Old English clud "rock" (only later used to denote vapor formations in the sky).
CLOUD French
From the Germanic personal name Hlodald, composed of the elements hlod "famous, clear" and wald "rule", which was borne by a saint and bishop of the 6th century.
CLOUGH English (British)
The distinguished surname Clough is of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin. It is derived from the Old English "cloh," meaning "ravine" or "steep-sided valley," and was first used to refer to a "dweller in the hollow."
CLOYD Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of CLWYD.
CLUFF English
Derived from pre 7th century word "cloh" meaning a ravine or steep-sided valley.
CLUTE Dutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
CLUTTERBUCK English, Dutch (Anglicized, ?)
English surname of unknown origin, possibly a corrupted form of a Dutch surname derived from Dutch klateren "to clatter" and beek "brook". The original surname may have been brought to England by Flemish weavers whom Edward III brought to England in the 14th century to teach their techniques to the English, or by Huguenots who fled the Netherlands in the 16th century to escape religious persecution... [more]
CLWYD Welsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
CLY Navajo
From Navajo tłʼaaí meaning ‎"lefty, left-handed one", from the verb nishtłʼa ‎"to be left-handed".
CLYDE Scottish
A river in the south-west of Scotland, running through Inverclyde, Ayrshire, Dunbartonshire, Lanarkshire, and the city of Glasgow. The second longest in Scotland; and the eighth longest in the United Kingdom... [more]
CMIEL Polish
From the Polish noun 'trzmiel', which means "bumblebee."
COACH Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of MCCAIG.
COACH French
Possibly an altered spelling of French Coache, from the Norman and Picard term for a damson, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of plums.
COAKLEY Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COALLA Asturian (Hispanicized)
Castilianized form of CUAYA.
COARD German
Derived from the first name KONRAD.
COATES English
Meaning of the Cottage or Cottages
COATES African American
A notable bearer of this surname is Laura Gayle Coates (Born 1979) is an American legal analyst for the news network CNN.
COATH English
Derived from the Cornish word for smith, goff.
COATNEY English
The initial bearer of this surname lived in a little cottage.
COBAIN Scottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COBALT English
Name given to a person who mined cobalt.
ÇOBAN Turkish
Means "shepherd" in Turkish.
ČOBAN Croatian, Serbian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''. Cognate of Turkish ÇOBAN.
ČOBANAC Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANIĆ Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANKOVIĆ Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANOV Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANOVIĆ Croatian, Serbian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANSKI Croatian (Rare)
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
COBBOLD English
From the medieval male personal name Cubald (from Old English Cūthbeald, literally "famous-brave").
COBERLEY English
Possibly from a village in England called Coberley
COCHRANE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
COCICOVA Russian
Feminine form of COCICOV.
COCIÑA Galician
It literally means "kitchen".
COCKE English
nickname from Middle English cok ‘cock’, ‘male bird or fowl’ (Old English cocc), given for a variety of possible reasons. Applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock, it soon became a generic term for a youth and was attached with hypocoristic force to the short forms of many medieval personal names (e.g. Alcock, Hancock, Hiscock, Mycock)... [more]
COCKER English, German (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a bellicose person, from Middle English cock "to fight". Also an anglicized form of KÖCHER.
COCUZZA Italian
From cocuzza "gourd", "pumpkin", applied either as an occupational name for a grower or seller of gourds or a nickname for a rotund individual.
CODEY Irish
Based off of the given name Cody
CODREANU Romanian, Moldovan
A common surname in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
COE English
English (Essex and Suffolk): nickname from the jackdaw, Middle English co, Old English ca (see Kay). The jackdaw is noted for its sleek black color, raucous voice, and thievish nature, and any of these attributes could readily have given rise to the nickname.
COENS Medieval German
Variation of Coen. A diminutive of KONRAD/CONRAD, an old German Emperor's name (compare its Dutch form 'Coenraad')... [more]
COERS German, Dutch
Derived from the given name KONRAD
COFFEE Irish
Variant of COFFEY.
COFFEY Irish
Ireland County Cork
COFFIN English
The House of Coffin is an ancient English family which originated in Devonshire.
COGGESHALL English
Habitational name from Coggeshall in Essex, England, which was derived from Cogg, an Old English personal name, and Old English halh meaning "nook, recess".
COGGILL English
Recorded in several forms as shown below, this is a surname of two possible nationalities and origins. Firstly it may be of Scottish locational origins, from the lands of Cogle in the parish of Watten, in Caithness, or secondly English and also locational from a place called Cogges Hill in the county of Oxfordshire... [more]
COILL Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COINEAGAN Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of CUNNINGHAM.
COISH Anglo-Saxon, English, English (Australian), English (American)
Derived from Old English cosche and cosshe (c.1490), meaning "small cottage" or "hut". The medieval Coish family held a seat in Cambridgeshire.
COIT Medieval Welsh, French, English
The surname Coit was first found in Carnarvonshire, a former country in Northwest Wales, anciently part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, and currently is divided between the unitary authorities of Gwynedd and Conwy, where they held a family seat... [more]
COITO Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Latinized, ?)
That means a wedding or the nuptials.
COJUANGCO Filipino
From Hokkien 許寰哥 (Khó͘ Hoân-ko), which was the nickname of Co Yu Hwan (許玉寰), a Chinese migrant who arrived in the Philippines in the 19th century. This is the name of a prominent political and business family in the Philippines.
COKAYNE English
Medieval English nickname which meant "idle dreamer" from Cockaigne, the name of an imaginary land of luxury and idleness in medieval myth. The place may derive its name from Old French (pays de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty", ultimately from the Low German word kokenje, a diminutive of koke "cake" (since the houses in Cockaigne are made of cake).
COKER English
Variant of COCKER.
ÇOLAK Turkish
Means "one-armed, crippled" in Turkish.
COLBATH English
Means "cold".
COLBURN English
Habitational name from a place near Catterick in North Yorkshire.
COLDEN English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLEGIO Spanish
Literally means "college" in Spanish.
COLELLA Italian
diminutive of personal name COLA, a short form of Nicola, an Italian equivalent of NICHOLAS... [more]
COLES English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of NICHOLAS.... [more]
COLEY English
With variant COLLEY can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas.
COLFAX English
From a medieval nickname for someone with dark or black hair, from Old English cola "charcoal" and feax "hair".
COLLABRUSCO Italian
From the region Calabria in southern Italy; widely moved to US.
COLLARD English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLET French
From a pet form of Colle.
COLLEY English
With variant COLEY, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
COLLIER English
This name is derived from Middle English cole, from Old English col meaning "coal", combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a burner, gatherer or seller of coal.
COLLIN Swedish
Combination of an unknown first name element (likely derived from a place name) and the common surname suffix -in.
COLLINES French
French for "hillbanks".
COLLINSWORTH English
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
COLLIS English
A variant of Collins, itself a patronymic of given names Collin or Colin, both ultimately nicknames for Nicholas.
COLLUM Northern Irish
Reduced form of northern Irish MCCOLLUM.
COLMENARES Spanish
It literally means "apiaries", denoting someone who either worked at some or lived near some.
COLO Italian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
COLOMBRES Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish in Ribadeva.
COLON Spanish (Americanized), Filipino
Unaccented form of COLÓN primarily used in America and the Philippines.
COLONEL American
From a French word for a military rank of an officer who led a column of regimental soldiers. Could be a nickname for someone with a military bearing or demeanor.
COLSTON English
Colston means “Coal town settlement.” It is also a variant of COLTON.
COLTER English
English occupational name for someone who looked after asses and horses, from an agent derivative of Colt. Compare Coulthard. Variant spelling of German Kolter.
COLTONSON English
Means "Son of COLTON".
COLTRANE Irish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coltaráin.
COMAN English, French, Romanian
Means "bent or crooked".
COMBEFERRE Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COMEAU French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUX French (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French COMEAU.
COMIM Italian
It mans waiter in italian.
COMINERO Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Rare)
Means "gatherer of cumin" from the spanisgh word "comino".
COMMANDER Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
COMMEGNO Friulian
Imaginative, wealth, adventurer
COMMONS Breton
It's generally believed this name comes from a Breton personal name, derived from element "cam," meaning "bent," or "crooked;" or from the herb "cummin" (cumin). Or from the place name Comines, in Flanders, Northern France.... [more]
COMPTON English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
CONAHAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó CONNACHAÍN (see CUNNINGHAM).
CONANT Ancient Celtic, Pictish
A patronym from the ancient Celtic personal name Conan, which derives from the Celtic kunovals meaning "high" and "mighty".... [more]
CONATSER English (Anglicized)
A variant of the German last name Konitzer.
CONCEIÇÃO Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCEPCIÓN Spanish
Means "conception'' in Spanish, in reference to the Immaculate Conception of Virgin Mary.
CONCEPCION Spanish (Filipino-style, Filipinize)
Unaccented form of CONCEPCIÓN primarily used in the Philippines and America.
CONDON Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
CONE Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONEJO Spanish
Spanish for rabbit from Latin "cuniculus". Given to someone who hunted rabbits.
CONEY English
Means "seller of rabbits", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rabbit (in either case from Middle English cony "rabbit").
CONG TANG TON NU Vietnamese
Often written with the middle two words uncapitalized when with a full name; example: Con tang ton Nu Hue Hue. The first name is Hue Hue, and the surname is Cong tang ton Nu. It is a female royal Vietnamese surname created by the NGUYEN Dynasty.
CONIGLIO Italian
Means rabbit in Italian from Latin "cuniculus" given to someone who hunted rabbits.
CONKLIN Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish COUGHLIN.
CONLEY Irish
Variant of CONNOLLY.
CONLIN Irish
Variant of Conlon.
CONLON Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONNICK Yiddish
Variation on KOENIG.
CONQUEST English
Probably from a medieval nickname, perhaps applied to a domineering person. This surname is borne by the British poet, historian and critic Robert Conquest (1917-).
CONRAD German
Americanized spelling of KONRAD.
CONRADI German, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name KONRAD.
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