All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Dömötör Hungarian
From the given name Dömötör.
Don Scottish
Don derives from the Old Gaelic "donn", brown, or the Old English pre 7th Century "dunn", brown, or the Old English pre 7th Century "dunn", dull brown or dark, and was originally given as a distinguishing nickname to someone with dark hair or a swarthy complexion.
Donabedian Armenian
Patronymic from classical Armenian tōnapet meaning ‘head of a festival’.
Donadieu French
Meaning “given to God”, surname given to a child because they were given to a priest or monastery or either an orpan.
Donaghy Irish
Irish: variant of Donahue.
Donaire Spanish, Filipino
From Spanish el donaire meaning "grace,charm". It could be a nickname for a graceful or charming person.
Do Nascimento Portuguese (Brazilian)
Variant of Nascimento. This surname was borne by several Brazilian soccer players, including Pelé (1940-2022), Ramires (1987-) and Thiago Alcântara (1991-).
Donatelli Italian
Patronymic from a pet form of Donato.
Donatello Italian
From the given name Donatello.
Donatien French
From the given name Donatien.
Donato Italian
From the medieval personal name Donato (Latin Donatus, past participle of donare, frequentative of dare "to give"). It was the name of a 4th-century Italian bishop martyred in c. 350 under Julian the Apostate, as well as various other early saints, and a 4th-century grammarian and commentator on Virgil, widely respected in the Middle Ages as a figure of great learning.
Donatsch Romansh
Derived from the given name Donatus.
Donatucci Italian
From a pet form of the given name Donato.
Donavan Irish
Meaning unknown. Possibly transferred use or Irish word for Don or Donald.
Donceanu Romanian
Meaning unknown.
Doneddu Italian
From Sardinian doneddu "little gift".
Donegan Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Donnagáin. Diminutive of "donn" which means "brown," referring to hair color.
Donel Irish
Variant of Donnel
Donell Irish
Variant of Donnell
Dong Chinese
In Chinese, it means "east". An origin of Dong is the simplification of the surname Dongfang, which originates from Fu Xi.
Dongfang Chinese (Rare)
From Chinese 東方 (dōngfāng) meaning "east".
Donham Scottish
A surname meaning "House on the Hill" .
Dönmez Turkish
Means "steadfast, steady, firm" in Turkish.
Donn Scottish, Irish
Variant of Donne.
Donna Italian
Probably a matronymic, from the given name Donna meaning "lady, mistress" in classical Italian and "woman" in modern Italian. May alternately derive from a place name.
Donnaloia Italian
A matronymic from Italian donna "lady, mistress" and Aloia.
Donnel Irish
Variant of Donnell
Donnellan Irish
From the Gaelic Domhnallain, a diminutive of Donnell/Domhnall meaning "world mighty" (Irish form of the Scottish Donald).
Donnrin Irish
Irish origin derived from Donn. ... [more]
Donough Irish
From the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha meaning "the descendent of Donnchadh" (cf. Donoghue).
Donskikh Russian
Derived from the name of the Don river, derived from an Aryan root meaning "river".
Donson English
Means "son of Don
Donth Low German (Rare)
Donth is a very rare surname that comes from Germany. No real information about this surname.
Dönz Romansh
Variant of Tönz.
Doolittle English
From a medieval nickname applied to a lazy man (from Middle English do "do" + little "little"). It was borne by the American poet Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961). A fictional bearer is Eliza Doolittle, the flower seller in Bernard Shaw's 'Pygmalion' (1913); and a variant spelling was borne by Dr Dolittle, the physician who had the ability to talk to animals, in the series of books written by Hugh Lofting from 1920.
Dopereiro Galician
This is a surname that alludes to the locality of Pereiro de Aguiar (northern Spain). Also, this is an apple tree and its fruit is the pero (apple fruit).
Do Pereyro Galician
Do Pereyro is an apple tree. It is very old surname, dating from the Middle Ages. Do Pereyro comes from Galicia (northern Spain).
Dopson English
Means "son of Dobbe".
Dor Hebrew (Modern)
From the given name Dor, means "generation" in Hebrew.
Dora Romansh
Derived from the given name Dorothea.
Dorado Spanish
From dorado "golden" (from Late Latin deaurare "to gild", from aurum "gold"), probably applied as a nickname to someone with golden hair.
Dorchester English
Derived from either the village in Oxfordshire, or the county town of Dorset, England (both of which have the same name). Both are named with a Celtic name, respectively Dorcic and Durnovaria combined with Old English ceaster meaning "Roman fort, walled city".
D'Oreste Italian
From the given name Oreste
D'orevalle French (Archaic)
Variant form of D'aurevalle. A known bearer of this surname was the medieval bishop Hugh d'Orevalle (d. 1084 or 1085).
Dorin Romanian
From the given name Dorin.
D'orival French
Variant form of D'oreval. This is also one of the very few forms (of what is ultimately the D'aurevalle surname) that is still in use nowadays.
Dorizzi Romansh
Derived from the given name Duri.
Dorji Bhutanese
Means "diamond"; derived from Tibetan. The Dorji are a prominent and powerful family in Bhutan, with some members having been monarchs or holders of government positions. In 2014, this was the most common surname in Bhutan.
Dorkenoo Akan
Meaning unknown.
Dorland English
A variant of Darling. It was a name for a person who was greatly loved by his friends and family. The surname was originally derived from the word deorling, which meant "darling".
Dorman English
From the Old English personal name Deormann, composed of Old English deor (see Dear) + mann 'man'. This surname became established in Ireland in the 17th century; sometimes it is found as a variant of Dornan.
Dorn German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
Dorn German, English
German cognitive and English variant of Thorn from Middle High German dorn "thorn" (from ancient Germanic thurnaz).
Dornan Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname Ó Dornáin
Dorney Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of O'Doirinne.
Dorofeev Russian
Variant transcription of Dorofeyev.
Dorofeyev Russian
Means "son of Dorofey".
Doron Hebrew
From the given name Doron.
Dorozhkin Russian
Derived from Russian дорожка (dorozhka) meaning "strip" or "small road, path".
Dörr German
Variant of Dürr.
Dorsay French
French form of Dorsey.
Dortmund German
Regional name for someone from Dortmund.
Dortmundt Dutch
Dutch form of Dortmund.
d'Orves French
Denoted someone from Orve, a commune in the Doubs department in eastern France.
Dorzhiev Buryat
From the given name Dorzho.
Dosch German
Topographic name for someone living near bushes or brush, from Middle High German doste, toste ‘leafy branch’, or a habitational name from a house with a sign depicting a bush. Also an altered spelling of Dasch.
Dosch Romansh
Variant of Dusch.
Doseolji Korean
Originated from the Gaya Confederacy
Doshi Indian, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali
Means "cloth seller" derived from Persian دوش (duš) meaning "shoulder".
Doss German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
Dos Santos Portuguese, Galician
Means "of the saints" in Portuguese and Galician, originally given to a person born or baptized on All Saints' Day.
Dossat English, Scottish
Possibly from French origins (used predominantly in Louisiana in the United States).
Dossett English
Recorded in several forms including Dowsett, Dosset, and Dossit, this is an English surname. ... [more]
Doster German, Belgian
A German surname, which is from an agent derivative of the Middle High German words 'doste' and 'toste' (meaning ‘wild thyme’, ‘shrub’, ‘bouquet’). It is a topographic surname which was given to someone whose land abutted an uncultivated piece of land, or possibly an occupational name for someone who dealt herbs.... [more]
Dostoyevsky Belarusian, Russian
Habitational name from Dostoev in Belarus.
Dotani Japanese (Rare)
戸 (Do) means "door" or 藤 (do) means "wisteria". 谷 (tani) means "valley".
Dotson English
Patronymic of the Middle English name Dodde. Originally derived from the Germanic root dodd meaning "something rounded", used to denote a short, rotund man.
Dötter German
From a Germanic personal name formed with theud ‘people’, ‘race’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘strong’ or hari, heri ‘army’
Dou Chinese
From Chinese 窦 (dòu) meaning "hole, burrow".
Douangdara Lao
From Lao ດວງ (douang) meaning "ball, sphere, circle" and ດາລາ (dara) meaning "star".
Douangmala Lao
From Lao ດວງ (douang) meaning "circle" and ມາລາ (mala) meaning "bunch of flowers, garland".
Douangphachanh Lao
From the Lao classifier ດວງ (douang) for spherical objects and ພະຈັນ (phachanh) meaning "moon".
Douangphrachanh Lao
Alternate transcription of Lao ດວງພະຈັນ (see Douangphachanh).
Douangsavanh Lao
From Lao ດວງ (douang) meaning "circle, sphere" and ສະຫວັນ (savanh) meaning "heaven".
Doubleday English
Possibly from the nickname or byname do(u)bel meaning "the twin", or a combination of the given name Dobbel (a pet form of Robert) and Middle English day(e) meaning "servant".
Doubrava Czech
It means "forest".
Doucet French
Nickname for a gentle minded person from French doux "sweet" (from Latin dulcis).
Doucouré Western African, Soninke
Meaning uncertain.
Doud English, Irish
Variant of Dowd.
Dougenis Greek
Possibly from the elements doulos (δουλος)- "slave, servant" and genes (γενης)- "born".
Doughty English
Doughty. This interesting surname of English origin is a nickname for a powerful or brave man, especially a champion jouster, deriving from the Middle English "doughty", Olde English pre 7th Century dohtig dyhtig meaning "valiant" or "strong"... [more]
Douillard French
Nickname for a softie, possibly derived from Old French do(u)ille meaning "soft, tender".
Doukakis Greek
Means "son of the duke", from Greek Δούκας (doúkas) combined with the patronymic suffix ακης (akis).
Doukas Greek
From medieval Greek doukas "duke", "lord", from Latin dux. This was the name of a family of imperial rank in medieval Byzantium.
Doux French
From French meaning "sweet". Probably a nickname for someone who's gentle and kind-hearted.
Doval Galician
From 'do val' meaning 'of the valley. Galician origins.
Dovzhenko Ukrainian
Derived from the word довгий meaning "long" in Ukrainian.
Dow Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
Doward English, Welsh
Indicated that the bearer lived by two hills, from Old Welsh dou "two" and garth "hill"
Dowd Irish
From Irish Ó Dubhda meaning "descendant of Dubhda", where Dubhda is a byname derived from Irish dubh "black, black-haired".
Dowd English
Derived from the given name Doude.
Dowdall Irish
Of English origin
Dowell English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic name Dubhgall, composed of the elements dubh meaning "black" and gall, "stranger". This was used as a byname for Scandinavians, in particular to distinguish the dark-haired Danes from fair-haired Norwegians.
Dowler English
Occupational name for a maker of dowels and similar objects, from a derivative of Middle English “dowle”.
Down English
Derived from Old English dun meaning "down, low hill".
Downard English
Downard comes from England as a diminutive of Downhead in Somerset and Donhead in Wiltshire.
Downe English (British)
a Sloping Declivity or Tract of Low Hills
Downey Irish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
Downing Anglo-Saxon
from 'Dunning', a patronymic meaning 'Son of Dunn', 'Dunn' being a nickname for someone with brown coloring
Downs English
This surname is derived from the Old English element dun meaning "hill, mountain, moor." This denotes someone who lives in a down (in other words, a ridge of chalk hills or elevated rolling grassland).
Dowrick English
This name is found fairy widely in Cornwall, England.
Dowson English
Either a patronymic surname derived from the given name Dow, a medieval variant of Daw (which was a diminutive of David), or else a metronymic form of the medieval feminine name Dowce, literally "sweet, pleasant", from Old French dolz, dous (cf... [more]
Doyenarte Medieval Basque (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
It means a place or site near the forest.
Dozier French
Meaning "lives near willow trees" or possibly someone who made goods, such as baskets, from willow wood.
Drabkin Belarusian, Jewish
Jewish (from Belarus): metronymic from Yiddish drabke “loose woman”. Can also be from drabki Belarusian 'light cart' (+ the same suffix -in), an occupational name for a coachman (Alexander Beider).... [more]
Drach Irish
Variant of Drake.
Drach Jewish
Ornamental surname derived from German Drache "dragon" (ultimately from Middle High German trache).
Dracula Romanian
The Wallachian name for dragon was "Drac" or "Dracul". Vlad II of Wallachia joined a semi-secret order known as The Order of the Dragon and took the name Vlad Dracul. The word "Drac" can also mean "devil" or "evil spirit"... [more]
Drag Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several farms named Drag. The place name is related to Old Norse draga "to pull" (compare modern Norwegian dra with the same meaning) and originally denoted a place where boats were pulled along a river or across an isthmus.
Drag Polish
Nickname for a tall, thin person.
Dragan Romanian
Possibly from the given name Dragan or a form of Draganov.
Dragavei Romanian (Rare)
"It is a wild plant that consists in big curly leaves.It is called curly dock in english."
Dragomir Romanian
From the given name Dragomir.
Dragomirović Serbian
Means "son of Dragomir" in Serbian.
Dragon French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
Dragonetti Italian
Diminutive of drago or dragone "dragon".
Dragoo American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
Drakeford English
The first element of this locational surname is probably derived from the personal name Draca or Draki (see Drake), while the second element is derived from Old English ford meaning "ford"... [more]
Drakopoulos Greek
Descendant or son of the dragon.
Drakos Greek
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which means "dragon, serpent"
Dramis Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Not just a surname in Italy; it can also be found in Argentina and Brazil.... [more]
Dransfield English
Means "Drains the fields".
Drapkin Belarusian, Jewish
Phonetic spelling in Belarus of Drabkin... [more]
Draxler German
Derived from the Middle High German "Drehseler," meaning "turner," and was most likely initially borne by a turner or lathe worker.
Dray English
From Middle English dregh, probably as a nickname from any of its several senses: "lasting", "patient", "slow", "tedious", "doughty". Alternatively, in some cases, the name may derive from Old English drýge "dry, withered", also applied as a nickname.
Drażba Polish
Polish occupational name from dražba "auction".
Dražeta Serbian
Derived from the name Dražen.
Dražić Croatian, Serbian
Patronymic, meaning "son of Draža".
Dreik French
Derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".
Drennan Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
From Gaelic Ó Draighneáin meaning "descendant of Draighneán", a byname meaning "blackthorn".
Drepanis Greek
From the Greek word for scythe: drepani (δρεπάνι).
Drescher Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a thresher, German Drescher, Yiddish dresher, agent derivatives of Middle High German dreschen, Yiddish dresh(e)n 'to thresh'.... [more]
Drešević Montenegrin
Habitational name for someone from Drešaj, Montenegro.
Dressel Italian
Italian form of Dressler
Drewery English
Variant of Drury.
Drewitt English, French
English (Wiltshire Berkshire and Surrey): of Norman origin from the Old French personal name Druet a diminutive of Drue Dreu (from ancient Germanic Drogo); see Drew Alternatively the name may be from a diminutive of Old French dru ‘lover’
Drewry English
Variant of Drury.
Drexel German, Jewish
It originates from the pre 7th century word 'dreseler' meaning 'to turn', a verb which in medieval times had a wide range of meanings.
Dreyfus French, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of Dreyfuss, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
Dreyfuss German, Jewish
Means "three feet" in German. This surname originates from the German city of Trier. The Latin name for the city was "Treveris," whose pronunciation eventually developed into Dreyfuss. The spelling variants tend to correspond to the country the family was living in at the time the spelling was standardized: the use of one "s" tends to be more common among people of French origin, while the use of two tends to be found among those of German descent
Dridi Arabic (Maghrebi)
Meaning unknown (chiefly Tunisian and Algerian).
Driggers American
Corruption of the Spanish surname Rodriguez. Originated in 17th century Virginia as a former slave by that surname was integrated into free society.
Dring English
Means "young man" (from Old Norse drengr).
Driver English
Occupational name for a driver of horses or oxen attached to a cart or plow, or of loose cattle, from a Middle English agent derivative of Old English drīfan ‘to drive’.
Drobnjak Serbian, Montenegrin, Croatian
Drobnjaci are a historical tribe and region in Montenegro.
Dropkin Jewish, Belarusian
Jewish (from Belarus): nickname from Belorussian drobka ‘crumb’+ the eastern Slavic patronymic suffix -in.... [more]
Drost Dutch, German, Danish
Occupational name for a steward or head servant.
Drouillard French
Probably a derogatory nickname, from a derivative of the regional term drouiller "to defecate", which also has various figurative senses.
Drown English
Derived from drone meaning "honey bee"
Drowne English
Variant of Drown
Drozdowski Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Drozdowo or Drozdów, for example.
Druery English
Variant of Drury.
Druimeanach Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Drummond.
Drum Scottish
Habitational name from a place and castle in Aberdeenshire named from Gaelic druim "ridge".
Drummer English
Locational name from a place called Drummer, near Chadderton in Lancashire. The meaning is possibly from the pre 7th century Olde English 'drum' meaning "a ridge".
Drummonds Scottish
Variant of Scottish Drummond.
Drury English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
Drux German
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
Dryden English
Possibly from an English place name meaning "dry valley" from the Old English elements drȳġe "dry" and denu "valley". A notable bearer was the English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright John Dryden (1631-1700).
Drye English
Variant of Dryer.
Dryer English
From an agent derivative of Old English dr̄gean "to dry"; possibly an occupational name for a drier of cloth. In the Middle Ages, after cloth had been dyed and fulled, it was stretched out in tenterfields to dry.
D'Sa Indian (Christian)
Form of De Sá more common among Christians from India.
Đščić Serbo-Croatian
Lol totally a made up name