All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Coon Scottish, Irish
Variant of Cunningham 1, Coonaghan and other names from the same family
Coonrod Dutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
Cooray Sinhalese
Sinhala form of Correia.
Coorey Sinhalese
Alternate transcription of Sinhala කුරේ (see Cooray).
Coors German
Variant of Cords.
Coot English
“an early member was a person who seemed to exhibit some of the characteristics of birds.”
Cooter English
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of Cotter, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
Cope Anglo-Saxon
Earliest origins of the Cope surname date from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain, for a person who habitually wore a long cloak or cape. The surname Cope is derived from the Old English word cope, which emerged about 1225 and comes from the Old English word cape, which refers to a cloak or cape.
Copeland English
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
Copenhagen Jewish
From the name of the capital city of Denmark.
Copernicus History
Nicolaus Copernicus is a mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe... [more]
Coppenhaver German
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
Coppins English
From a reduced diminutive of Jacob.
Çopur Turkish
Means "pockmarked" in Turkish.
Copus English
For full analysis of the origin for the name Copus/Copas I would refer you to my family website copusfamily.co.uk
Corai Romansh
Variant of Coray.
Coray Romansh
Derived from the given name Conrad.
Corbalán Aragonese
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
Corbeanu Romanian
Derived from Romanian corb, itself originally from the Latin corvus meaning "raven" (bird).
Corbeddu Sardinian
Means "son of Corbu" in Sardinian.
Corbelli Emilian-Romagnol
May be mean 'raven-like' or 'basket maker'.
Corbett English, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
Corbin English, French
Derived from French corbeau meaning "raven," originally denoting a person who had dark hair.
Corbyn English
Variant of Corbin, notably borne by current Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (1949-).
Corcovado Spanish
Means "hunchback" in Spanish. It would denote a person with a curved spine.
Cord Northern Irish
Reduced form of Mccord.
Cordasco Italian
From the given name Corda or Cordio (a short form of Accord(i)o, literally "agreement") + the suffix -asco denoting kinship.
Corday French
Either from the French word corde meaning "cord/rope/string", or from the Latin word cor meaning "heart." This was the surname of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who killed Jacobin leader Jean-Paul Marat during the French revolution.
Cordeiro Portuguese, Galician
Means "young lamb" in Portuguese and Galician (Latin cordarius, a derivative of cordus "young", "new")... [more]
Cordell English
Means "maker of cord" or "seller of cord" in Middle English.
Corden English
Derives from Old French Cordon meaning "a seller of ribbon" or from Cordoan, a locational job description for a worker in fine kid leather. Originally associated with the city of Cordova in Spain... [more]
Corder French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
Cordero Spanish
Means "lamb" in Spanish, either used as an occupational name for a shepherd or a religious name referring to Jesus as the Lamb of God.
Cordett Romansh
Derived from the given name Conrad.
Cordier French
Given to someone who worked or made with cord and or strings from old French corde "string".
Cordisco Italian
Possibly from Italian cordesco "second-born lamb, butchered calf".
Córdoba Spanish
Indicates someone who was originally from the city of Córdoba (Cordova) in Andalusia, Spain. The name itself is derived from Phonecian Qʾrtuba meaning "Juba’s city", itself from Phonecian qʾrt meaning "city" and juba referring to King Juba I of Numidia.
Cordonnier French
An occupational surname for a cordwainer or shoemaker, and derived from Old French cordouanier, literally meaning "cobbler".
Cordoveiru Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Pravia.
Cordray English
From a medieval nickname for a proud man (from Old French cuer de roi "heart of a king").
Cords Low German
Patronymic form of the given name Cord.
Core English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
Corea Sinhalese
Sinhala form of Correia.
Coreano Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "Korean" in Spanish and Portuguese, possibly an ethnic name or regional name for someone from Korea or who had connections with Korea.
Corio Italian
Variant of Coiro.
Cork English
Metonymic occupational name for a supplier of red or purple dye or for a dyer of cloth, Middle English cork (of Celtic origin; compare Corkery).
Corke English
Variant of Cork.
Corkery Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
Corkill Manx, Irish
The name is an Anglicised form of the Gaelic Mac Thorcaill ("son of Thorkell") which is derived from the Old Norse personal name meaning "Thor's kettle".
Corkish Manx
From a reduced form of Gaelic "Mac Mharcuis" meaning "Son of Marcas".
Corlett Manx
Anglicization of Manx (Mac) Thórliótr "(son of) Þorliótr".
Corliss English
Derived from Old English carleas "free from anxiety; unconcerned", cognate to Old Norse kærulauss. This was a nickname given to a carefree person.
Corll German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Karl.
Ćorluka Croatian
Derived from Turkish körlük, meaning "blindness".... [more]
Cormican Scottish
From a pet form of the Gaelic personal name Cormac (see McCormick).
Cormier French
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
Cornacchia Italian
Nickname meaning "crow, jackdaw" in Italian, applied to someone who was talkative or thought to resemble a crow or jackdaw in some other way.
Cornelio Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
From the given name Cornelio. Cognitive of Cornell and Cornelius.
Cornelis Flemish, Dutch
From the given name Cornelis.
Cornet English
Variant of Cornett, meaning Horn.
Corney English
A habitational surname from places in Cumbria and Hertfordshire named Corney, from Old English corn "grain", a metathesized form of cron, cran 'crane' + eg 'island'. It seems possible, from the distribution of early forms, that it may also derive from a lost place in Lancashire.
Cornu French
Means foolish in French variant of Le Cornu.
Cornwall Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
Cornwallis Scottish
Example: Lord Charles Cornwallis.
Cornwell English
Habitational name from Cornwell in Oxfordshire, named from Old English corn, a metathesized form of cron, cran ‘crane’ + well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’.variant of Cornwall.
Coronacion Spanish (Philippines)
Derived from Spanish coronación, meaning "coronation", referring to the idea that the Virgin Mother of God was physically crowned as Queen of Heaven after her Assumption.
Coronado Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic), Spanish (Philippines)
Means "crowned." This was possibly a nickname for one resembling a clergyman who has received the tonsure.
Coronado Spanish
from coronado "crowned" past participle of coronare "to crown" (from Latin corona "crown") applied as a nickname for someone who behaved in an imperious manner or derived from the village Coronado in Galacia.
Coronel Spanish, Portuguese
Means "colonel" in Spanish and Portuguese, used as an occupational name for someone in command of a regiment.
Corongiu Italian
Possibly from Sardinian corongiu "rocky hill, boulder, large mass", denoting someone who lived near such a landmark, or perhaps a nickname based on the bearer's physical appearance.
Corpus Anglo-Saxon
It was a name given to a dark-haired person. In Yorkshire and Suffolk, the surname Corpus is derived from the Old Norse word korpr, which means raven; in Oxfordshire, the surname is derived from the Old French word corp, which has the same meaning.
Corpuz Spanish (Philippines)
Variant of Corpus primarily used in the Philippines.
Corr Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of Corra".
Corradini Italian, Romansh
Italian patronymic form of Corradino.
Corradino Italian
Derived from the given name Corradino.
Corrado Italian
From the personal name Corrado.
Corraine Irish
Anglicized form of the surname Ó Corráin.
Corrales Spanish
Habitational name for someone originally from any of the various locations named Corrales in Spain, from Spanish corral meaning "coral, enclosure".
Corrao Italian
Reduced form Corrado.
Corrias Italian
Probably from Sardinian corria "leather strap, lace, belt; narrow strip of land".
Corrie English
Habitational name from places in Arran, Dumfries, and elsewhere, named Corrie, from Gaelic coire "cauldron", applied to a circular hanging valley on a mountain.
Corrie Scottish
Scottish spelling of Mccorry.
Corrigan English
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
Corrin Manx, Scottish
First documented in 1290, sources suggest prototypes to be of Norse and/or Irish origins or a Manx contraction of Mac Oran from Mac Odhrain.
Corrin Manx, Scottish
Manx and Irish contracted form of MacTorin, McCorryn, Mac Odhráin, and Mac Corraidhin
Corris Manx
Depalatalized form of Corish.
Corry English, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic word “coire”, meaning “cauldron”
Corsaut French
Possibly a variant of Cossart.
Corsi Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Corso.
Corsica Italian, Corsican
Denotes a person from Corsica.
Corso Italian, English (American), Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Either derived from the given name Bonaccorso or taken from Italian and Spanish corso, denoting someone who lived in Corsica.
Corson English
Nickname from Old French 'corson', a diminutive of curt ‘short’
Corson Dutch (Americanized, ?)
From the given name of Cors Pieters, a sailor with the Dutch West Indies Company, who arrived in the Dutch Colony, New Amsterdam (present day New York), on or before 1638... [more]
Cort Polish, Russian, Jewish
Derived from the surname "Kutalczuk", "Kotelchik", "Cuttlechuck", or "Kuttlechuck"
Corte Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Portuguese
From corte ‘court', applied as an occupational name for someone who worked at a manorial court or a topographic name for someone who lived in or by one.
Cortès Catalan
Catalan form of Cortés.
Cortês Portuguese
Portuguese form of Cortés.
Cortright English
Habitational surname from the Dutch Kortrijk for a person from a place of this name in Flanders. Perhaps also a respelling of English Cartwright.
Coruña Galician, Filipino
Literally means "crown" in Galician, perhaps taken from a place named "a coruña".
Corvin Hungarian (Americanized)
Shortened and Americanized form of Corvinus.
Corvino Italian, Spanish
From the given name Corvino
Corvinus Hungarian
dirived from Corvin, maning raven.
Corvo Italian, Portuguese
From the given name Corvo
Cosain Filipino, Maranao
From the given name Cosain.
Cosca Italian
Topographic name from the Calabrian dialect word c(u)oscu "oak", also "wood".
Cosco Italian
Masculinized form of Cosca.
Coscollola Catalan
This indicates familial origin within or within the vicinity of the eponymous farmhouse in the municipality of Lladurs.
Cosgrove English
Habitational name from Cosgrove in Northamptonshire, named with an Old English personal name Cof + Old English graf "grove", "thicket".
Cosgrove Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
Čosić Croatian
Variant spelling of Ćosić.
Coşkun Turkish
From the given name Coşkun.
Cosmescu Romanian
Means "son of Cosmin" in Romanian.
Cosmo Italian
From the given name Cosmo.
Coss English
English short form of Cossio.
Cossack Irish
Variant of Cusack
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Cossiga Italian, Sardinian
Sardinian translation of the place name Corsica. A famous bearer of the name is Francesco Cossiga (1928-2010), Italian politician who served as Prime Minister (1979-1980) and as President (1985-1992).
Cossu Italian
Probably from Sardinian cossu "tub, trough, basin".
Costabile Italian
Italian name.... [more]
Costache Romanian
From the given name Costache
Costain English, Scottish, Manx
When originating in Scotland Northern Ireland, and the Isle of Man the surname is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Austain, meaning "son of Austin"... [more]
Costantino Italian
From the given name Costantino
Costello Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oisdealbhaigh meaning "son of Oisdealbhach". The given name Oisdealbhach is derived from Irish os meaning "deer, fawn" and dealbhach meaning "resembling, shapely".
Coster English
Metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of costards (Anglo-Norman French, from coste 'rib'), a variety of large apples, so called for their prominent ribs.
Costic English (American)
Americanized form of Polish, Ukrainian and Rusyn Kostyk, Slovak and Czech Kostik and in some cases possibly also of Serbian Kostić or Croatian and Serbian Koštić.
Costiniu Romanian
Meaning unknown.
Cota Galician
From Galician meaning "animal den".
Cotner Medieval Low German (Americanized)
Likely originating from an Americanized spelling of Kötner or Köthner, status names for a cotter. Derived from Middle Low German kote ‘shelter’, ‘cottage’.
Cotoni Italian
means "cottons" in Italian
Cott English
From the Old English personal name Cotta. Possibly an altered spelling of French Cotte, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of chain mail, from Old French cot(t)e ‘coat of mail’, ‘surcoat’... [more]
Cotter English
Derived from the Old English elements cot "cottage, hut" and the suffix -er. In the feudal system a cotter held a cottage by service (rather than by rent). Reaney gives the surname deriving from the Old French cotier "cottager" (see: villein)... [more]
Cotter Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oitir "son of Oitir", a personal name borrowed from Old Norse Óttarr, composed of the elements ótti "fear, dread" and herr "army".
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottonwood English
The name of a person who lived among cottonwood trees.
Cottrant French
Meaning unknown.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Cotugno Italian
From Sicilian cutugnu "quince (tree)"
Coulibaly Western African, Manding
Francization of Bambara kulu bari meaning "without a canoe", referring to someone who crossed a river or another body of water without the use of a canoe.
Coullson Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic Mac Cumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger" and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
Coulombe French
Variant of Colombe and Colomb.
Coulon French
From Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columba) used as a metonymic occupational name for a breeder.
Coulson English
Means "son of Cole".
Council English, German
1 English: nickname for a wise or thoughtful man, from Anglo-Norman French counseil ‘consultation’, ‘deliberation’, also ‘counsel’, ‘advice’ (Latin consilium, from consulere ‘to consult’)... [more]
Countryman English
Translation of German Landmann, Landsmann or Dutch Landman, Landsman, which means ‘countryman’ or ‘fellow countryman’.
Courcel French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
Courcelles French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
Courfeyrac Literature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
Couric French
Originally a nickname given to a short person, derived from Middle Breton corr, korr meaning "dwarf, midget". A well-known bearer of this surname is the American journalist, television host and author Katie Couric (1957-).
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courtier French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
Courts English
Variant of Court.
Courville French
Derived from either of two communes in the departments of Marne and Eure-et-Loir in France. It is named with Latin curba villa, denoting a settlement in the curve of a road.
Cousin English, French
Nickname derived from Middle English cousin and Old French cosin, cusin meaning "cousin".
Cousins French
"Relative" in Old French.
Cousland Scottish
Of local origin from Cousland in the parish of Cranston, Midlothian.
Couter English
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
Coutinho Portuguese
Diminutive of Couto.
Couzens English
Patronymic form of Cousin.
Cova Catalan, Galician
Topographic name from Catalan and Galician cova ‘cave’, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, in the provinces of Lugo, Ourense, Pontevedra, Catalonia and Valencia.
Coventry English
habitational name from the city of Coventry in the West Midlands, which is probably named with the genitive case of an Old English personal name Cofa (compare Coveney) + Old English treow 'tree'.