All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Doux French
From French meaning "sweet". Probably a nickname for someone who's gentle and kind-hearted.
Doval Galician
From 'do val' meaning 'of the valley. Galician origins.
Dovzhenko Ukrainian
Derived from the word довгий meaning "long" in Ukrainian.
Dow Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
Doward English, Welsh
Indicated that the bearer lived by two hills, from Old Welsh dou "two" and garth "hill"
Dowdall Irish
Of English origin
Dowell English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from the Gaelic name Dubhgall, composed of the elements dubh meaning "black" and gall, "stranger". This was used as a byname for Scandinavians, in particular to distinguish the dark-haired Danes from fair-haired Norwegians.
Dowler English
Occupational name for a maker of dowels and similar objects, from a derivative of Middle English “dowle”.
Downard English
Downard comes from England as a diminutive of Downhead in Somerset and Donhead in Wiltshire.
Downey Irish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
Downing Anglo-Saxon
from 'Dunning', a patronymic meaning 'Son of Dunn', 'Dunn' being a nickname for someone with brown coloring
Downs English
This surname is derived from the Old English element dun meaning "hill, mountain, moor." This denotes someone who lives in a down (in other words, a ridge of chalk hills or elevated rolling grassland).
Dowrick English
This name is found fairy widely in Cornwall, England.
Dowson English
Either a patronymic surname derived from the given name Dow, a medieval variant of Daw (which was a diminutive of David), or else a metronymic form of the medieval feminine name Dowce, literally "sweet, pleasant", from Old French dolz, dous (cf... [more]
Doyenarte Medieval Basque (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
It means a place or site near the forest.
Dozier French
Meaning "lives near willow trees" or possibly someone who made goods, such as baskets, from willow wood.
Drabkin Belarusian, Jewish
Jewish (from Belarus): metronymic from Yiddish drabke “loose woman”. Can also be from drabki Belarusian 'light cart' (+ the same suffix -in), an occupational name for a coachman (Alexander Beider).... [more]
Dracula Romanian
The Wallachian name for dragon was "Drac" or "Dracul". Vlad II of Wallachia joined a semi-secret order known as The Order of the Dragon and took the name Vlad Dracul. The word "Drac" can also mean "devil" or "evil spirit"... [more]
Drag Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several farms named Drag. The place name is related to Old Norse draga "to pull" (compare modern Norwegian dra with the same meaning) and originally denoted a place where boats were pulled along a river or across an isthmus.
Drag Polish
Nickname for a tall, thin person.
Dragan Romanian
Possibly from the given name Dragan or a form of Draganov.
Dragavei Romanian (Rare)
"It is a wild plant that consists in big curly leaves.It is called curly dock in english."
Dragomir Romanian
From the given name Dragomir.
Dragomirović Serbian
Means "son of Dragomir" in Serbian.
Dragon French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
Dragonetti Italian
Diminutive of drago or dragone "dragon".
Dragoo American, French (Huguenot)
Americanized form of Dragaud, a French (Huguenot) surname derived from the Germanic given name Dragwald, itself derived from the elements drag- meaning "to carry" and wald "power, rule".
Drakeford English
The first element of this locational surname is probably derived from the personal name Draca or Draki (see Drake), while the second element is derived from Old English ford meaning "ford"... [more]
Drakos Greek
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which means "dragon, serpent"
Dramis Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Not just a surname in Italy; it can also be found in Argentina and Brazil.... [more]
Dransfield English
Means "Drains the fields".
Drapkin Belarusian, Jewish
Phonetic spelling in Belarus of Drabkin... [more]
Draxler German
Derived from the Middle High German "Drehseler," meaning "turner," and was most likely initially borne by a turner or lathe worker.
Dray English
From Middle English dregh, probably as a nickname from any of its several senses: "lasting", "patient", "slow", "tedious", "doughty". Alternatively, in some cases, the name may derive from Old English drýge "dry, withered", also applied as a nickname.
Drayton English
I had a maternal grandfather with the surname Drayton who came from Shrewsbury, Shropshire but cannot find any reference.
Drażba Polish
Polish occupational name from dražba "auction".
Dražeta Serbian
Derived from the name Dražen.
Dražić Croatian, Serbian
Patronymic, meaning "son of Draža".
Dreik French
Derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".
Drennan Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
From Gaelic Ó Draighneáin meaning "descendant of Draighneán", a byname meaning "blackthorn".
Drescher Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a thresher, German Drescher, Yiddish dresher, agent derivatives of Middle High German dreschen, Yiddish dresh(e)n 'to thresh'.... [more]
Drešević Montenegrin
Habitational name for someone from Drešaj, Montenegro.
Dressel Italian
Italian form of Dressler
Drewery English
Variant of Drury.
Drewry English
Variant of Drury.
Drexel German, Jewish
It originates from the pre 7th century word 'dreseler' meaning 'to turn', a verb which in medieval times had a wide range of meanings.
Dreyfus French, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of Dreyfuss, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
Dreyfuss German, Jewish
Originates from the German city of Trier. The Latin name for the city was "Treveris," whose pronunciation eventually developed into Dreyfuss. The spelling variants tend to correspond to the country the family was living in at the time the spelling was standardized: the use of one "s" tends to be more common among people of French origin, while the use of two tends to be found among those of German descent
Dridi Arabic (Maghrebi)
Meaning unknown (chiefly Tunisian and Algerian).
Driggers American
Corruption of the Spanish surname Rodriguez. Originated in 17th century Virginia as a former slave by that surname was integrated into free society.
Driker ?
Means 'printer'.
Dring English
Means "young man" (from Old Norse drengr).
Driver English
Occupational name for a driver of horses or oxen attached to a cart or plow, or of loose cattle, from a Middle English agent derivative of Old English drīfan ‘to drive’.
Drobnjak Serbian, Montenegrin, Croatian
Drobnjaci are a historical tribe and region in Montenegro.
Dropkin Jewish, Belarusian
Jewish (from Belarus): nickname from Belorussian drobka ‘crumb’+ the eastern Slavic patronymic suffix -in.... [more]
Drost Dutch, German, Danish
Occupational name for a steward or head servant.
Drouillard French
Probably a derogatory nickname, from a derivative of the regional term drouiller "to defecate", which also has various figurative senses.
Drown English
Derived from drone meaning "honey bee"
Drowne English
Variant of Drown
Drozdowski Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Drozdowo or Drozdów, for example.
Druery English
Variant of Drury.
Druimeanach Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Drummond.
Drum Scottish
Habitational name from a place and castle in Aberdeenshire named from Gaelic druim "ridge".
Drummer English
Locational name from a place called Drummer, near Chadderton in Lancashire. The meaning is possibly from the pre 7th century Olde English 'drum' meaning "a ridge".
Drummonds Scottish
Variant of Scottish Drummond.
Drury English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
Drux German
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
Dryden English
Possibly from an English place name meaning "dry valley" from the Old English elements drȳġe "dry" and denu "valley". A notable bearer was the English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright John Dryden (1631-1700).
Drye English
Variant of Dryer.
Dryer English
From an agent derivative of Old English dr̄gean "to dry"; possibly an occupational name for a drier of cloth. In the Middle Ages, after cloth had been dyed and fulled, it was stretched out in tenterfields to dry.
D'Sa Indian (Christian)
Form of De Sá more common among Christians from India.
Đščić Serbo-Croatian
Lol totally a made up name
D'Silva Indian (Christian)
Variant of Silva more common among Christians from India.
D'Souza Indian (Christian)
Form of De Souza used by Christians in India.
Du Aimé French
The Duaime surname comes from an Old French word "hamel," which meant "homestead." It was likely first used as a name to describe someone who lived at a farm on the outskirts of a main town, or for someone that lived in a small village.
Dualeh Somali
Meaning unknown.
Duan Chinese
From Chinese 段 (duàn) meaning "section, piece, division". According to legend, the name was adopted by the descendants of Shu Duan, a son of a Zheng duke who unsuccessfully tried to overthrow his elder brother.
Dubach German (Swiss)
A surname describing a person from the town of Tübach in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
Dube Ndebele, Zulu
It means Zebra. It is usually a surname instead of a person's name used by Zimbabwean Ndebele people and South African Zulu people.... [more]
Dubec Slovak
Very old word for oak
Dubhagáinn Irish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
Dubljević Montenegrin
Derived from dublje (дубље), meaning "deeper".
Duboi French
Variant of Dubois.
Dubosque French
DuBosque means 'of the forest' in french and was a surname given typically to someone from a rural treed area.
Dubreuil French
Topographic name derived from Old French breuil meaning "marshy woodland" (also derived from Late Latin brogilum, of Gaulish origin). In French the term later came to mean "enclosed woodland" and then "cleared woodland", and both these senses may also be reflected in the surname.
Dubuisson French
A topographic name for someone who lived in an area of scrub land or by a prominent clump of bushes, derived from Old French buisson meaning "small tree, bush, scrub".
Đức Vietnamese
From the given name Đức.
Ducasse French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by an oak tree, from Old French casse ‘oak (tree)’ (Late Latin cassanos, a word of Celtic origin), with the fused preposition and article du ‘from the’... [more]
Duch Slovak, Czech
Means "ghost" in Slovak.
Duchek Czech
Duchek is short form of name Duchoslav.
Duchêne French
Means "from the oak (tree)" in French, used to denote a person who lived near an oak tree or an oak forest.
Dück Low German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
Duck English, Irish
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
Duck Dutch
Dutch variant of Duyck. In a German-speaking environment, this is also a variant of van Dyck and Dyck.
Duckstein English (British)
From Audrey Duckstein, who was a fourth-grade girl in SRES>
Ducksworth English
Variant spelling of Duckworth.
Duckworth English
Habitational name from Duckworth Fold, in the borough of Bury, Lancashire, which is named from Old English fuce "duck" and wor{dh} "enclosure".
Dudaev Chechen, Ossetian (Russified)
Variant transcription of Dudayev.
Dudarov Ossetian (Russified)
Russified Ossetian name of unknown meaning, possibly of Turkic origin.
Dudayev Chechen, Ossetian (Russified)
Russified form of a Chechen and Ossetian family name of disputed meaning; the name may be derived from Ossetian дудахъхъ (dudaqq) meaning "bustard", from Ingush тат (tat) meaning "Mountain Jew", or from Circassian дадэ (dade) meaning "grandfather" or "king, head, chief"... [more]
Duddridge English
It is locational from a "lost" medieval village probably called Doderige, since that is the spelling in the first name recording (see below). It is estimated that some three thousand villages and hamlets have disappeared from the maps of Britain over the past thousand years... [more]
Dude English
Derived from Old English word doughty which meant "manly".
Dudin Russian
Derived from Russian дудка (dudka), which denotes a wind-blown instrument similar to a flute or pipe. It was probably used to denote a musician or shepherd who played the flute or pipe, as well as someone who made pipes... [more]
Dudkin Russian
Derived from Russian дудка (dudka) meaning "fife, pipe", referring to a folk instrument played by shepherds. Thus, it was used to denote someone who made pipes or a shepherd who played pipes.
Dudzai Shona
Dudzai means "Speak it out, confess it".
Dudziak Polish
Nickname for a person who played the bagpipes or perhaps sold them, derived from Polish duda meaning "bagpipe".
Duesler Upper German
DueslerDuesslerDüslerDußlerhttp://www.duesler.com/html/charles_duelser_s_book.HTM "Duesler / Duessler / Dueßler http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-6 , http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-2 Andrew & brother Jacob were the Progenitors of Duesler, Duessler, Dueßler s from 1752 Germany to America... [more]
Duesterwald German
Variant spelling of Düsterwald.
Dufau French
The name DUFAU come from two French words DU which means « of the » and FAU which is old French for a beech tree. Surnames in France were given later so the person with this name meant he/she had a beech tree in his property... [more]
Dufault French
Alternate spelling of Dufau, meaning "of the beech tree."
Duffield English
The meaning is dove field or open country. It's origin is the Yorkshire area named after a few places there.... [more]
Dufresne French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
Dufva Swedish
From Swedish duva "dove, pigeon".
Dugal Indian
Based on the name of a Khatri clan. In India the name is more commonly spelled Duggal.
Dugald English (British), Scots
An English Masculine Name Used In The Edwardian Period, Dugald Stewart (1753-1828) Was An Scottish Philosopher
Duggan Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
Dugmore Medieval English
This habitational name is chiefly found in the West Midlands region of England. The origin is certainly Old English pre 7th Century and may be Ancient British i.e. pre Roman 55 A.D. The origins are lost but are believed to develop from "Dubh" meaning "black" and "mor" a morass or swamp... [more]
Dugonja Bosnian
This surname is used at: Sarajevo, Mostar, Dubrovnik, Novi Pazar.
Dugopolski Polish (Anglicized)
To originate from Długopole, Poland.
Duguid Scottish
Probably "do good", from a Scottish nickname for a well-intentioned person or (ironically) a do-gooder.
Duhamel French
Topographic name for someone who lived in a hamlet, from Old French hamel, a diminutive of ham "homestead", with fused preposition and definite article du.
Duhaylungsod Filipino, Cebuano
Means "having two hometowns" from Cebuano duha meaning "two" and lungsod meaning "town."
Duisenov Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Duysenov.
Duisterwoud Dutch
Dutch equivalent of Düsterwald.
Dujardin French
Means "from the garden" in French.
Dukakis Greek
Dukakis means "son of the duke or little duke".
Dukelow English
This surname is of Old French origin. It was initially introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, and subsequently by French Huguenot refugees fleeing religious persecutions in their own country... [more]
Du Lac Arthurian Romance
In the series Merlin, this was the surname of Sir Lancelot: Lancelot du Lac. du Lac possibly means "of the lake."
Dulaney Irish
Variant of Delaney.
Dulcamara Italian
given to my great great grandfather who was left on the doorstep of a church in Chiavari Italy. The priest took inspiration from names of plants in the garden. This one came from the plant in English would mean 'bitter sweet nightshade'
Dulev Macedonian (Rare, Archaic)
The meaning and origin is still not known it is an Old Macedonian surname ... [more]
Dulin French
The surname Dulin is most common in France and is an occupational name meaning "from flax". Pronounced "du LIN" in English; however, in French it is pronounced "du LON". Anglicized in some cases as Duling, Dowling, or Dulong (a more common French surname brought to England, Ireland and Scotland from French Normans and later Huguenots).
Dumagit Visayan
Literally "to swoop" or "to snatch" in Cebuano. Related to Dumaguete, capital of the province of Negros Oriental.
Duman Turkish
Means "smoke, haze, fog" in Turkish.
Dummitt English
Habitational name from Dumart-en-Ponthieu in Somme, France.
Dunaway English
Originally indicated someone who came from the village and civil parish of Dunwich in Suffolk, England, derived from Old English dun meaning "hill" (or possibly dune meaning "valley") and weg meaning "way"... [more]
Dunayevskaya Russian
Feminine spelling of Dunayevsky.
Dunayevsky Russian
Derived from Europe's second longest river, the Danube River, which is called "Dunay" in Russian. Two famous bearers are Soviet film composer and conductor Isaak Dunayevsky (1900-1955), and his son, Russian film composer Maksim Dunayevsky (1945-).
Duncans Scottish
Means "son of Duncan".
Dundale English
((Anne))... [more]
Dundas Scottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish (Counties Leitrim and Fermanagh): habitational name from Dundas, a place near Edinburgh, Scotland, which is named from Gaelic dùn ‘hill’ + deas ‘south’.
Dundass Scottish
Variation of Dundas possibly miss spelled at imagination into Quebec (Lower Canada) late 18th Century
Dundović Croatian
Patronymic of the Ragusan word dundo meaning "uncle" or "gentleman" and originating from the Latin word dominus (meaning "master" or "sir").
Dundreary English
This was a nickname for someone who had dundrearies, which were long sideburns.
Dunford English
Derived either from Dunford Bridge in Yorkshire (named after the River Don and the English word “Ford”), or from Dunford House in Yorkshire (named after “Dunn’s Ford”). One known bearer is US General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Dungog Filipino, Hiligaynon, Cebuano
Means "pride, honour" or "celebrity" in Hiligaynon.
Dunkinson English (British)
Derives from the Scottish surname of Duncanson with the same meaning of "son of Duncan". Likewise, it may derive further from the Gaelic male given name "Donnchad", related ultimately to "Donncatus", a Celtic personal name of great antiquity.
Dunleavy Irish, English
Anglicized form of Mac Duinnshléibhe meaning "son of Donn Sléibhe".
Dunmore English, Scottish
Habitational name from Dunmore Farm in Oxfordshire or from any of many places in Scotland named in Gaelic as Dún Môr 'great hill'.
Dunne Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
Dunsmuir Scottish
From the lands of Dundemore in Fife, Scotland.
Dunwoody Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
It is said that the origin is pre 7th century Gaelic from ''dun'' or ''din'' meaning a wood or forest and ''gwydd'' which means much the same. Arguably the name means wood - wood, a result of language and dialect changing several times in the past 1500 years.
Đường Vietnamese
From 唐代 (Tàng Dài) which is the Chinese Tàng Dynasty.
Dương Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Yang, from Sino-Vietnamese 楊 (dương).
Dupain French
Means "of the bread" in French, probably used as an occupational name for a baker.
DuPaul French
From the given name Paul.
Dupin French
Means "of the pine tree" in French, referring to a person who lived near a pine tree or was from any of various locations named Le Pin.
du Plessis Afrikaans, French Creole, French (Cajun), French (Huguenot)
French topographic name for someone who lived by a quickset fence, Old French pleis (from Latin plexum past participle of plectere ‘plait’, ‘weave’), with fused preposition and definite article du ‘from the’... [more]
Dupouy French
Variant of Dupuy.
Dupré French
Means "of the meadow" in French.
Duran Catalan
Catalan cognate of Durand.
Durani Pashto
Variant transcription of Durrani.
Durantez Spanish
From the given Italian name Durante.
Durbin French
Derived from the place called D'urban or D'urbin in Languedoc
Durden English
A different form of Dearden. A fictional bearer is Tyler Durden, a character from Chuck Palahniuk's 'Fight Club' (1996) and its subsequent film adaptation (1999).
Duret French
Derived from French dur meaning "hard, tough".
Durga Indian, Odia, Telugu
From the given name Durga, the name of a Hindu warrior goddess.
Durham English
Denotes a person from either the town of Durham, or elsewhere in County Durham, in England. Durham is derived from the Old English element dun, meaning "hill," and the Old Norse holmr, meaning "island."
Durieux French
Derived from Old French riu meaning "river, stream", originally used to indicate someone who lived by a stream.
Durkin Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Mac Duarcáin meaning "son of Duarcán".