All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Carosella Italian
From carosello "carousel, merry-go-round", possibly a nickname for a farmer, as a carousel was an allotment of grain collected by farmers. Also a type of jousting tournament.
Caroso English (American)
Surname of Panther Caroso from the Star Fox 64 series.
Caroti Italian
From Italian carota "carrot", probably referring to the bearer's hair colour.
Carpenito Italian
This surname derives from a person who had worked as a "carpenter".
Carpentieri Italian
Italian cognate of Carpenter, from carpentiere "carpenter".
Carpintero Spanish
Means "carpenter" in Spanish.
Carpus English (Rare, ?)
Possibly from the given name Carpus.
Carradine English, German (Anglicized)
Variant spelling of Caradine. This name is borne by members of the Carradine family of actors, notably the American actor John Carradine (1906-1988).
Carrasquillo Spanish
The surname Carrasquillo is of Spanish origin and it is derived from the word "carrasca" which means "holm oak". Therefore, the name roughly translates to "a place where there are holm oaks".
Carraway English (British)
The name Carraway belongs to the early history of Britain, and its origins lie with the Anglo-Saxons. It is a product of one having lived on a road near a field or piece of land that was triangular in shape... [more]
Carre French
French (Carré): from Old French carré "square", applied as a nickname for a squat, thickset man.
Carreau French
Variant of Carrel. It could also be a habitational name from several places named Carreau in France.
Carreira Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician cognate of Carrera.
Carrel French
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
Carrell English
English: from Old French carrel, ‘pillow’, ‘bolster’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of these. In some cases perhaps an altered spelling of Irish Carroll... [more]
Carrender English (American)
Probably from Scottish kerr meaning "rough, wet ground" combined with ender (possibly related to the end of something). It probably denoted someone who lived between rough, wet ground and normal ground.
Carreño Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
Carrera Spanish, Italian
Spanish: topographic name for someone living by a main road, carrera ‘thoroughfare’, originally a road passable by vehicles as well as pedestrians (Late Latin carraria (via), a derivative of carrum ‘cart’), or a habitational name from any of various places named with this word.... [more]
Carrey Irish
Variant of Carey. A famous bearer is Canadian-American actor and comedian Jim Carrey (1962-).
Carrick Scottish
The possible roots of the Carrick family name may be from the ancient Strathclyde people of the the Scottish/English Borderlands. Carrick may also be of local origin, referring to those who lived in or near the place called Carrick in Ayrshire... [more]
Carrie Scottish
Scottish form of Carry.
Carrier English
An occupational name meaning someone who transports goods.
Carrier French
From carrier, "quarrier, someone who works in a quarry". cf Carrara.
Carrington English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
Carrión Spanish
It comes from the knight Alonso Carreño, who distinguished himself in the conquest of the town of Carrión de los Condes (Palencia), where he founded his solar house.
Carrizo Spanish
Nickname for a person who's bold, shameless.
Carrogu Italian
Possibly from Sardinian carroga "crow, carrion crow".
Carrothers Scottish
Variant spelling of Carruthers.
Carrow English
English: habitational name from either of two places: Carrow in Norfolk or Carraw in Northumberland. The first is thought to be named from Old English carr ‘rock’ (a Celtic loan word) + hoh ‘spur of a hill’, while the last may be named either from an Old British plural of carr, or from carr + Old English raw ‘row’... [more]
Carruthers Scottish
This old Scottish surname was first used by Strathclyde-Briton people. The Carruthers family in the land of Carruthers in the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire. In that are it is pronounced 'Cridders'.... [more]
Carry Irish
Shortened form of McCarry and O'Carry.
Carsin French
Of debated origin and meaning; theories include a contracted form of Caorsin.
Carstairs English (British)
From the manor or barony of the same name in the parish of Carstairs (= 1170 Casteltarres, 'Castle of Tarres').
Carsten English
Could mean son of Carsten.... [more]
Cartagena Spanish
From the name of the city of Cartagena in southeastern Spain, derived from Latin Carthāgō Nova meaning "New Carthage" (ultimately derived from Phonecian qrt-ḥdšt meaning "new city").
Cartan Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carten Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Cartier French, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
Cartin Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Cartman English
Originally referred to a man who worked with a cart. A famous bearer is Eric Cartman from the adult cartoon South Park
Cartmell English
Denoted a person from Cartmel, a village in Cumbria, England (formerly in Lancashire). It is the site of a famous priory, inland from Cartmel Sands. The place name is derived from Old Norse kartr meaning "rocky ground" and melr meaning "sandbank".
Cartmill Anglo-Saxon
The name Cartmill is an old Anglo-Saxon name. It comes from when a family lived in or near the village of Cartmel in the county of Lancashire (now part of Cumbria.) Thus, Cartmill is a habitation surname which is derived from the name of a place... [more]
Carton Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carucci Italian
Derived from Medieval Latin names Carutius or Caruccius or from the Italian term caruccio composed by caro meaning "dear" with the endearment suffix -uccio.
Carulli Italian
It should derive from the late Latin cognomen Carullus, a hypochoristic form of the more widespread cognomen Carus.... [more]
Caruthers Scottish
Means "Rhydderch's fort" in Cumbric. This might refer to the king of Alt Clut, Rhydderch Hael.
Carveth English
From the village of Carveth, from Cornish Karvergh meaning "fort of horses".
Carville French, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
Carvoeiro Portuguese
Derived from the Portuguese word "carvão," which means "coal." It likely originated as a surname for someone who worked with or lived near coal, or it could have been a nickname based on physical characteristics or personal attributes associated with coal.
Cary African American
This surname is a variant of the surname Carey.
Casa Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Means "house" in Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian.
Casabuena Spanish (Modern, Rare)
Means "Happy House" or "House of Happiness" in Spanish, with the Spanish word "Casa", which means "House" and Buena, meaning "Happy" or "Happiness".
Casaday Irish
Variant spelling of Irish Cassidy .
Casado Spanish
Origin uncertain. Perhaps from casado "married", it may also be an alteration of Quesada.
Casagrande Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of the various locations called Casagrande or Casa Grande, derived from Italian casa meaning "house" and grande meaning "big, large".
Casals Catalan, French
Plural form of Casal.
Casamitjana Catalan
It indicates familial origin within either of 3 farmhouses: the one in Castellnou de Bages, the one in l'Esquirol, or the one in Moià.
Casanabe French
CASANABE is a French name meaning New house.
Casanova Catalan, Italian
Catalan and Italian: topographic name from Latin casa ‘house’ + nova ‘new’, or a habitational name from any of the many places named with these words.
Casapiccola Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of the various locations called Casapiccola or Casa Piccola, derived from Italian casa meaning "house" and piccola meaning "small".
Casares Spanish, Galician
One who lived in several places named "Casares".
Casari Italian
Smarano, Italy... [more]
Casarrubias Spanish
Topographic name from the plural of Spanish casa rubia ‘red house’.
Casas Spanish
Origin uncertain. Possibly from casas "houses", which was used for several location names. Alternatively, it may be a corruption of Casaus, which was the name of two French knights that helped in the conquest of Seville.
Casaulta Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and aulta, the feminine form of the adjective ault, "high".
Casavantes French, Spanish, Basque
Topographic name composed of casa "house" + avant "ahead of forward" + the suffix -es, denoting one who lived in the house located at the beginning of a village. This surname has died out in France.
Cascalho Portuguese (?)
What I know about this surname is that it came from Alentejo, a region in Portugal countryside. The eldest Cascalho I know lived in Évora (city in this province) so I assume the name born there...
Caschimun Romansh (Archaic)
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Schimun.
Case French
Case. A hut, a hovel.
Caseel Romansh
Variant of Caseli.
Caseli Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Seli, a short form of Basilius.
Casella Italian
From casa "house" (Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin"), perhaps originally denoting the occupier of the most distinguished house in a village. Italian chef Cesare Casella (1960 - ) is one such bearer of this name.
Casement Manx
Anglicized and reduced form of Manx Gaelic Mac Asmuint meaning "son of Ásmundr". A notable bearer was Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), an Irish-born British consular official and rebel.
Cases Catalan
Catalan family name. Plural of 'casa' meaning 'house', possibly given to people who were given or built a manor or town house or had a slightly better than normal dwelling for their location/village etc..... [more]
Cashion Irish
Anglicized form of either Mac Caisin or Ó Caisin meaning "descendant of Caisín" (see Cassidy).
Casiano Spanish
From the given name Casiano.
Casielles Asturian
From the town of Casielles, Asturias, Spain. From "casa" (house) and the suffix -ielles, a diminituve suffix, so this surname could mean "little houses".
Casilang Tagalog
Literally "One you are born with" in Tagalog.
Casilao Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano kasilaw meaning "lustre, shine".
Casillas Spanish
From any of various places called Casillas or Las Casillas, from the plural of casilla, a diminutive of Casa. ... [more]
Casimir French
From the given name Casimir.
Casio Spanish
From the given name Casio.
Caslari Jewish (Archaic), Judeo-Provençal, Judeo-Catalan, Judeo-French
Abraham ben David Caslari was a Catalan-Jewish physician. Abraham Caslari (presumably a different man) is also listed in the index of known Jews in France in the late middle ages in the book Judaia Gallica by Heinrich Gross.
Casley English
Derived from Old English C(e)atta, a personal name meaning "cat" and leah "woodland, clearing"."
Casparin Romansh
Derived from a diminutive of Caspar.
Casparis Romansh
Derived from the given name Casper.
Casperson English
Means "son of Casper".
Caspescha Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and Spescha.
Cassar Maltese
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Italian given name Cesare (via the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies) and a Maltese adoption of the Sicilian surname Cassarà... [more]
Cassata Italian
Derived from the Italian word cassata, denoting a sweet cake made with cheese and candied fruit.
Cassatt French
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
Cassatta Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish form of Cassata. Mostly used in Argentina.
Casse French
Means "oak" in Gallo-Roman
Cassel English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
Casselberry German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Kesselberg, which may derive from various places called Kesselberg or Kesselburg in the states of Baden-Württemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Bavaria in Germany.
Cassell English
Either (i) "person from Cassel", northern France, or "person from Kassel", Germany ("fort"); or (ii) a different form of Castle ("person who lives by or lives or works in a castle")... [more]
Cassese Italian
From Arabic قِسِّيس (qissis) "priest", perhaps a nickname for someone who worked for or was related to a priest, or perhaps someone who was notably pious.
Cassey Scottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
Cassiano Italian
From the given name Cassiano.
Cassio Italian
From the given name Cassio.
Castagna Italian
From Italian castagna "chestnut" (from Latin castanea) for someone who worked with chestnuts. Variant of Castagno and Italian cognitive of Chastain.
Castagno Italian
For someone who lived near a chestnut tree from castagno "chestnut" (from latin castanea). Variant of Castagna and Italian cognitive of Chastain.
Castaignède French
Stéphane Castaignède is a French rugby player and coach.... [more]
Castanati Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish Origins
Castañeda Spanish
Habitational name from any of various places called Castañeda, a Spanish word meaning "chesnut grove", itself derived from castaña meaning "chesnut".
Castanheira Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of Castañeda meaning "chestnut grove".
Castanho Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of Castaño meaning "chestnut tree".
Castaño Spanish, Galician
Means "chestnut tree" in Spanish and Galician.
Castañón Spanish
Possibly derived from Spanish castaño, meaning "chestnut tree". Alternatively, it may be derived from castañón, which is the Spanish word for the kippernut plant (species Conopodium majus).
Castel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Late Latin castellum "castle" (a diminutive of Latin castrum "fort Roman walled city") or a habitational name from any of several places called (Le) Castel... [more]
Castellan Italian
This name is of Latin origin. It comes from "castellanus" meaning 'castellan, steward of a castle'.
Castellaneta Italian
Originated in an area of Italy, known as the Papal States.
Castellani Italian
Italian form of Castellano.
Castellanos Spanish
Habitational name from any of various places called Castellanos, derived from Spanish castellano meaning "Castilian".
Castellar Medieval Italian, Medieval Spanish
An Italian surname variant of or relating to Castello , Castelli, or Spanish Castella, among others, the Castellar family name signified that the original bearers "lived at or near a castle"... [more]
Castelli Judeo-Italian, Italian, Spanish
Italian patronymic or plural form of Castello. ... [more]
Castello Catalan, Italian
Catalan variant of Castell or from Italian castello meaning "castle".
Castelmur Romansh
Derived from Romansh castel "castle" and mür "wall".
Castelnuovo Italian, Judeo-Italian
From Italian castello "castle" and nuovo "new".
Castelo Branco Portuguese
Means “White Castle” in Portuguese.... [more]
Castiel Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
The name of an angel of Thursday, travelling and guidance. Used in the show Supernatural for the character portrayed by Misha Collins
Castiglia Italian
A Regional name for someone from Castile in Spain. Castile was an independent kingdom between the 10th and 15th centuries, it formed the largest power in the Iberian peninsula. The name derives from the many castles in the region.
Castiglione Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Castiglione, derived from Italian castiglione meaning "castle, fortress".
Castillazuelo Aragonese
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
Castille French
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
Castillon French
means "castle"
Castiñeira Galician
Means "chestnut tree" in Galician, ultimately from Latin castanea.
Casto Late Roman (Rare, ?)
From the Latin personal name Castus ‘chaste’. Also a nickname from casto ‘chaste’, ‘pure’.
Caston English
A habitational name from a place named Caston, which is from the unattested Old English personal name Catt or the Old Norse personal name Káti + Old English tūn meaning ‘farmstead, settlement’.
Castonguay French (Quebec)
From a combination of Gaston and Guay, the name of a 17th-century French immigrant to Quebec, Canada.
Castrejon Spanish
Habitational Name From Any Of Various Places Called Castrejón Especially In Valladolid Province Or A Topographic Name From A Diminutive Of Castro ‘Castle’ From Latin Castrum ‘Fort Roman Walled City’.
Castrischer Romansh
Derived from the place name Castrisch.
Castrogiovanni Italian
Habitational name from Castrogiovanni, the name until 1927 of Enna in central Sicily.
Casuco Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano kasuko meaning "anger, hostility, fury".
Casura Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and sura "above; upper".
Casutt Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and sut "below".
Caswell English
Habitational name from places in Dorset, Northamptonshire, and Somerset named Caswell, from Old English cærse '(water)cress' + well(a) 'spring', 'stream'.
Catacutan Filipino, Tagalog
Derived from Tagalog katakutan meaning "fear, fright".
Catagbo Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano katagbo meaning "someone one is meeting with".
Çatal Turkish
Means "fork, prong, yoke" in Turkish.
Catanese Italian
One who came from Catania.
Catapang Filipino, Tagalog
From Tagalog tapang meaning "bravery, courage".
Catapano Italian
Means "catapan, governor of a catepanate", ultimately from Byzantine Greek κατεπάνω (katepánō) "(the one) placed at the top, or the topmost".
Catarino Spanish, Portuguese, Greek
Meaning "pure".
Catching English (American)
Americanized variant of German Göttgen.
Catching English
Likely a variant of Kitchen.
Catchpole English
Meant "bailiff, especially (originally) one who could seize domestic animals in lieu of tax or debt" (from Anglo-Norman cachepol, from cacher "to chase" + pol "chicken").
Catellan Venetian
Possibly a Venetian form of Catalano.
Catello Italian
From the given name Catello
Catena Italian
This surname means "chain" in Italian.
Cater English
Comes from the English word "caterer".
Cates English
English patronymic from the Old Norse byname Káti (from káti ‘boy’).
Catesby English
Derived from a civil parish with the same name, located in Northamptonshire, England. An infamous bearer was Robert Catesby (1572-1605), the leader of a group of English Catholics who attempted to assassinate King James VI and I in the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.
Cathcart Scottish
Habitational name from Cathcart near Glasgow.
Cathomas Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Thomas.
Cathomen Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Thoman.
Catindig Filipino, Tagalog
From Tagalog katindig meaning "upright, standing".
Catlett American (South)
There are several towns in the American South named Catlett.
Catone Italian
Derived from the name of the Roman republican statesman Cato, used as a nickname.
Catrambone Italian
Unexplained.
Catregn Romansh
Derived from the given name Catregna.
Cats Dutch, Jewish
Habitational name for a person from the village of Kats in Zeeland, Holland, or a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a cat, derived from Middle Dutch catte literally meaning "cat"... [more]
Catschegn Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and a short form of the given name Vincentius.
Catt English
Variant of Cat.
Catt English
Nickname from the animal, Middle English catte "cat". The word is found in similar forms in most European languages from very early times (e.g. Gaelic cath, Slavic kotu). Domestic cats were unknown in Europe in classical times, when weasels fulfilled many of their functions, for example in hunting rodents... [more]
Cattano Sicilian (Rare)
Meaning "captain," this name began as a nickname in the Medieval Ages, probably for someone who actually was a ship's captain, or perhaps for someone who acted in some way like a captain.
Cattell Anglo-Saxon, French, Old Norse
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Old Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
Catterall English
Derived from a town in England named "Catterall".
Cattermole English
Found mainly in Norfolk and Suffolk. Meaning uncertain; possibly from an east Anglian term meaning “dweller at the dyke”, or from Old French quatre moles “four mills”.
Cattley English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
Cattrall English
This surname is of Old Scandinavian origin, is an English locational name from Catterall, near Garstang in Lancashire, which appeared as "Catrehala" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and "Caterhale" in the Book of Fees of 1212... [more]
Cauchon French, Norman, Picard
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of slippers, derived from French chausson literally meaning "slipper".
Caulfield Irish
Comes from the Irish Gaelic Mac Cathmhaoil, which was Anglicized to McCawell and then morphed into Caulfield. Mac Cathmhaoil comes from a word meaning "chieftan".