Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is cutenose.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
GRABAREK Polish
Occupational name from a diminutive of grabarz ‘grave digger’.
GRABE German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike or ditch, or habitational name from either of two places in Thuringia named with this word: Grabe and Graba.
GREGORI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Gregorio.
HAHM German
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
HAIRFIELD English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
HAIZLIP English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
HALAMA Polish, Czech
Unflattering nickname meaning ‘big, lumbering fellow’, ‘lout’.
HALLMARK English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
HAMILL Scottish
Habitational name from Haineville or Henneville in Manche, France, named from the Germanic personal name Hagano + Old French ville "settlement".
HAMILL English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
HAMILL Irish
According to MacLysaght, a shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁdhmaill "descendant of Ádhmall", which he derives from ádhmall "active".
HANAFIN Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAinbhthín (modernized as Ó hAinifín) ‘descendant of Ainbhthín’, a personal name derived from ainbhíoth ‘non-peace’, ‘storm’.
HANES English, Welsh
variant spelling of Haynes.
HANNAM English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
HAPPYGOD English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
HARLIN English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
HASSELBACH German
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
HATSU Japanese
Hatsu is both a Japanese surname and a unisex name meaning "Beginning." Notable bearers of this surname is Akiko Hatsu (Japanese manga artist) and a bearer of the first name form is Hatsu Hioki (Japanese wrestler).
HAYDT German
Varient of Heid.
HAZARD English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HAZZARD English
Variant spelling of Hazard.
HEGEMAN Dutch
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hegge(n) or ter Hegge(n), derived from a word meaning ‘hedge’.
HEID German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
HỒ Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Hu.
HOLKERI Finnish
Finnish surname, derived from Scandinavian given name Holger.
HOTALING English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Hoogteijling, an indirect occupational name for a productive farmer, from hoogh ‘high’ + teling ‘cultivation’, ‘breeding’.
HUBERTZ Yiddish
Yiddish form of the German-Jewish surname Huberowitz, meaning "son of Heber."
HUMBOLDT German (?)
Derived from the Germanic given name Hunibald. Notable bearers of this surname were Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), a Prussian naturalist, geographer, explorer and polymath, and his brother Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835), a linguist, philosopher and diplomat.
HUNTZINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Hintschingen, earlier Huntzingen.
HURRY English
From a Norman form of the Middle English personal name Wol(f)rich (with the addition of an inorganic initial H-).
HUXFORD English
Habitational name from a place in Devon called Huxford (preserved in the name of Huxford Farm), from the Old English personal name Hōcc or the Old English word hōc ‘hook or angle of land’ + ford ‘ford’.
HYSLOP Scottish
Habitational name from an unidentified place in northern England, perhaps so called from Old English hæsel (or the Old Norse equivalent hesli) ‘hazel’ + hop ‘enclosed valley’.
IAVARONE Italian
Possibly from a shortened form of the personal name Ianni + varone, a variant of barone ‘baron’; literally ‘baron John’.
ICKES German, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
IKERU Japanese
From Japanese 蘓 (ikeru) meaning "revive, resurrect".
INGEBRETSEN Norwegian
Means "son of Ingebret". The given name Ingebret is a Norwegian alteration of Engelbert (see also Engebret).
INIESTA Spanish
Possibly from iniesta meaning "leafhopper".
ISAGO Japanese
From Japanese 沙 (isago) meaning "sand".
IWAAKI Japanese
From Japanese 岩 (iwa) meaning "cliff" and 明 (aki) meaning "bright". ... [more]
JACOBE Jewish
Variant spelling of Jacobi.
JACOBI Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOWAY English (American)
Altered form of the personal name Jacques.
JAHNS German
Patronymic from the personal name Jahn.
JALLOH Western African
Probably a derivative of Arabic Jalil.
JANI Indian, Odia, Gujarati
Derived from Sanskrit ज्ञानिन् (jñānin) meaning "knowing, learned, wise".
JEANPETIT French
Means "little Jean" from Old French petit "small" and the given name Jean, originally a nickname for a small man called Jean (or applied ironically to a large man), or a distinguishing epithet for the younger of two men named Jean.... [more]
JEREMY English
From the given name Jeremy.
KACZOR Polish
From the Polish word kaczor, meaning "duck".
KAHANANUI Hawaiian
From the given name Kahananui.
KAHUE Hawaiian
From the given name Kahue.
KAJIWARA Japanese
Written with characters meaning ‘oar’ and ‘plain’, this name is found mostly in western Japan.
KALAWAIʻA Hawaiian
From the given name Kalawaiʻa.
KALP German, Jewish
From Middle High German kalp ‘calf’, German Kalb, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who reared calves.
KAMAKA Hawaiian
From the given name Kamaka.
KANEMOTO Japanese
Topographic name meaning ‘(one who lives) near where gold (or any metal) is found’. Found in the island of Okinawa, where it is variously written. ... [more]
KANNAN Indian, Tamil
From the given name Kannan, the Tamil variant of Krishna.
KAPADIA Indian (Parsi), Indian, Gujarati
Means "cloth maker" from Gujarati કાપડ (kāpaḍ) meaning "cloth, fabric".
KARDASHIAN Armenian (Expatriate)
Means "son of the stonemason" frm Armenian քարտաշ (kʿartaš) meaning "stonecutter, stonemason" combined with the suffix -յան (-yan) denoting descent. Notable bearers include the Armenian-American Kardashian family with Robert Kardashian (1944-2003), a former businessman and Kimberly "Kim" Kardashian (1980-), a television personality and socialite.... [more]
KASEI Japanese
From Japanese 火星 (kasei) meaning "Mars".
KASTRATI Albanian
Derived from the name of the Kastrati tribe inhabiting the region of Malësia in northern Albania.
KAULITZ German (East Prussian)
Famous bearers of this surname are Bill Kaulitz (German singer, songwriter, voice actor, designer, and model) and his twin brother Tom Kaulitz (German singer, songwriter, voice actor, designer, and model) are both in the German pop-rock / alternative rock band, Tokio Hotel.
KAWABATA Japanese
'Side or bank of the river'; written two ways, with two different characters for kawa ‘river’. One family is descended from the northern Fujiwara through the Saionji family; the other from the Sasaki family... [more]
KAWASHIMA Japanese
From Japanese 川 (kawa) meaning "river, stream, brook" and 島 (shima) or 嶋 (shima) both meaning "island".
KEALOHA Hawaiian
From the given name Kealoha.
KEKOA Hawaiian
From the given name Kekoa.
KELEKOLIO Hawaiian
From the given name Kelekolio.
KENOBI Popular Culture
Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the 'Star Wars' saga, created by George Lucas. The meaning of the name is not known, but as Lucas was very much influenced by Japanese samurai movies, it is possible that the name is a combination of Japanese 剣 (ken) "sword" and 帯 (obi) "belt".
KERJEAN Breton
Possibly derived from a Breton place name, apparently composed of Breton kêr "city" and the name Jean.
KIỀU Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Jiao, from Sino-Vietnamese 矯 (kiểu).
KLOR German (Austrian)
The Klor surname may have evolved from the feminine personal name Klara. Or it may have come from the Middle High German and Middle Low German "Klar," meaning "Pure" or "Beautiful".
KO Korean
There is only one Chinese character for the surname Ko. There are ten different Ko clans, but they are all descended from the Ko clan of Cheju Island. There is no historical information regarding the founder of this clan, but there is a legend which tells of three men who appeared from a cave on the north side of Cheju Island’s Halla Mountain... [more]
KOJIMA Japanese
'Small island'; mostly found along the coast between Tōkyō and Kyōto and in the Ryūkyū Islands; an alternate reading found farther east is Ojima. Another Kojima with a different first character but similar meaning is found in western Japan.
KOLDEN German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
KONDA Japanese
Written with characters meaning ‘now’ and ‘rice paddy’, this version of the name is found mostly in eastern Japan. In western Japan it is pronounced Imata.
KONDA Telugu
Hindu name meaning ‘hill’ in Telugu.
KONDA Slovene
Pet form of the personal name Kondrad
KONNO Japanese
Variously written, most usually with characters meaning ‘now’ or ‘near’ and ‘field’. Found mostly in eastern Japan, farther to the northeast it is pronounced Imano.
KÖTH German
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
KRÄFT German, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
KRISH Indian
Shortened form of Krishna or of any other name beginning with Krishna (such as Krishnan, Krishnaswami, Krishnamurthy, etc.), used in the U.S. by families from southern India. It is not in use in India.
KRISHNAMURTHY Indian
Hindu name from Sanskrit kṛṣnamūrti meaning ‘manifestation of the god Krishna’, from krisna ‘black’ (epithet of an incarnation of the god Vishnu) + murti ‘image’, ‘manifestation’... [more]
KSIAZEK Polish
Nickname meaning ‘little priest’ or possibly a patronymic for an illegitimate son of a priest, from ksiadz ‘priest’ + the diminutive suffix -ek.nickname meaning ‘little prince’, from a diminutive of ksia?ze ‘prince’.
KUBA Japanese
Written with characters meaning ‘long time’ and ‘method’, this name is found mostly in the Ryūkyū Islands.
KUBA Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
From Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub.
KUBO Japanese
Meaning "sunken ground"; variously written, mostly with characters used phonetically. Found mostly in western Japan, apparently taken from several habitational names. Many unrelated families descend from various branches of the Taira, Minamoto, and other great families.
KUMAGAI Japanese
Means "bear valley", from Japanese 熊 (kuma) meaning "bear" and 谷 (gai) meaning "valley".
KUNIDA Japanese
From Japanese 国 (kuni) meaning "a land, a large place" combined with 田 (da) meaning "paddy, field".
KUSAYANAGI Japanese
From Japanese 草 (kusayanagi) meaning "grass" or 日 (kusayanagi) meaning "sun, day". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KUZMA Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the personal name Kuzma, Greek Kosmas, a derivative of kosmos ‘universe’, ‘(ordered) arrangement’. St. Cosmas, martyred with his brother Damian in Cilicia in the early 4th century ad, came to be widely revered in the Eastern Church.
LAAKSO Finnish
From laakso ‘valley’, generally an ornamental name adopted during the name conversion movement of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Often, it was adopted by Finnish bearers of Swedish names containing the Swedish element dal ‘valley’.
LACERDA Portuguese, Spanish
Nickname for someone with remarkably thick or long hair, or with an unusually hairy back or chest. From Spanish and Portuguese la cerda ‘the lock (of hair)’.
LADSON English
Patronymic of Ladd.
LAGERQUIST Swedish
Ornamental name composed of the elements lager ‘laurel’ + quist, an old or ornamental spelling of kvist ‘twig’.
LAMALFA Sicilian
Variant of Malfa, most probably a habitational name for someone from Malfa on the island of Salina (Messina), although the name has also been linked with Amalfi in Salerno and Melfi in Potenza.
LANCE English
From the Germanic personal name Lanzo, originally a short form of various compound names with the first element land ‘land’, ‘territory’ (for example, Lambert), but later used as an independent name... [more]
LANKA Lithuanian, Latvian
Probably a shortened form of Lithuanian Lankauskas.
LÄUFER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Lauf, also an occupational name for a messenger or a nickname for a fast runner, from an agent derivative of Middle High German loufen, German laufen ‘to run’.
LEACHMAN English
Occupational name for a physician’s servant, from Leach 1 + Middle English man ‘manservant’.
LEADBEATER English
Variant spelling of Ledbetter.
LEDO Spanish, Galician, Portuguese
Nickname from ledo meaning ‘happy’, ‘joyful’
LEDO Catalan
Variant spelling of Lledó, a habitational name from Lledó d’Empordà in Girona province.
LEITE Portuguese, Galician
Meaning "milk".... [more]
LEITER German
From Leiter ‘leader’, status name for a foreman or for the leader of a military expedition, from Middle High German leiten ‘lead’.German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Leitner.
LEWANDOWSKI Polish
Hhabitational name for someone from a place called Lewandów in Warszawa voivodeship, named with the vocabulary word lewanda, lawenda "lavender". Famous bearer of this surname is Polish footballer Robert Lewandowski.
LIDDINGTON English, Scottish (Rare)
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "of Liddington", a parish in Rutland, near Uppingham; a parish in Wiltshire, near Swindon.
LIEBHART German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements liub "beloved, dear" and hard "brave, strong".
LINDT German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
LITTLEJOHN Scottish, English
Distinguishing epithet for the smallest of two or more bearers of the common personal name John. Compare Meiklejohn. In some cases the nickname may have been bestowed on a large man, irrespective of his actual personal name, in allusion to the character in the Robin Hood legend, whose nickname was of ironic application.... [more]
LIZÁRRAGA Basque
Habitational name from any of three places called Lizarraga, in Navarra and Alava and Guipuzcoa provinces, which are named from Basque lizarr (or le(i)zar) "ash tree" and the locative suffix -aga.
LOAFMAN English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Laufmann.
LØKKEN Norwegian
Habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads so called. Derived from Old Norse lykkja "enclosure".
LOOK English
Habitational name from Look in Puncknowle, Dorset, named in Old English with luce ‘enclosure’.
LOOK English, Scottish
From a vernacular pet form of Lucas.
LUCKHARDT German
Metronymic derived from the given name Liutgard.
ŁUKASIEWICZ Polish
Patronymic from the personal name Łukasz.
LUKEHART English (American)
Americanized form of German Luckhardt.
LÜLL German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with liut- ‘people’ as the first element.
LULL English
From an Old English personal name, Lulla.
MAARSCHALKERWEERD Dutch
Meaning "Keeper of the horses."
MẠC Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Mo.
MACE English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
MACHI Sicilian
Unexplained. It may be from the Albanian personal name Maqo. Derivation from a Greek name ending in -akis, which has been suggested, is implausible.
MACHI Japanese (Rare)
町 (machi) means 'town' or 'street'. Some occurrences in America could be shortened versions of longer names beginning with this element, not common in Japan.
MADBOULI Arabic (Egyptian)
Variant transcription of Madbouly.
MADBOULY Arabic (Egyptian)
Egyptian surname of unknown meaning.
MAESTRE Portuguese, Spanish
Occupational name from old Spanish and Portuguese maestre meaning 'master', 'master craftsman', 'teacher'.
MAFFIA Italian
Variant of Mattia.
MAHARAJ South African, Indian, Trinidadian Creole, Fijian
Means "great king, great ruler", from Sanskrit महा (mahā) meaning "great, large, big" combined with राज (rāja) meaning "king, sovereign". It is also found among Indian communities abroad.
MAIA Portuguese
Habitational name from any of several places named Maia, especially one in Porto.
MAIÀ Catalan
Habitational name from Maià de Montcal, a village in Girona, or any of several other places named with Maià, which is of pre-Roman origin.
MAJ Polish, Jewish
Surname adopted with reference to the month of May, Polish maj. Surnames referring to months were sometimes adopted by Jewish converts to Christianity, with reference to the month in which they were baptized or in which the surname was registered.
MATAMALA Catalan
Town of the Capcir district, in the Northern Catalonia, now part of the Pyrénées-Orientales department in France.
MATEI Romanian
Came from the Romanian given name Matei.
MAURI Italian, Catalan
Patronymic or plural form of Mauro and patronymic name from the personal name Mauri, from Latin Maurus.
MCADORY Northern Irish (Rare)
Rare Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Deoraidh ‘son of the stranger’.
MCLAREN Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Labhrainn meaning "son of Labhrann", a Gaelic form of the given name Lawrence.
MEADER English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a meadow, from Mead 1 + the suffix -er, denoting an inhabitant.
MENDOSA Spanish
Variant spelling of Mendoza.
MENTZER German
Habitational name with the agent suffix -er, either from Mainz, earlier Mentz, derived from the medieval Latin name Mogontia (Latin Mogontiacum, probably from the Celtic personal name Mogontios), or from Menz in Brandenburg and Saxony.
MESSI African, Arabic, Italian
Famous bearer of this surname is Lionel Messi (born 1987-), an Argentinian footballer of Italian descent.
MIAN Muslim
From a title of respect, Urdu mian meaning ‘sir’ (from Persian miyān meaning ‘between’), used to address an older man. In Bangladesh this is common as a suffix added to the name of a respected person, especially a senior member of a village community.
MIANO Italian
Habitational name from Miano in Naples, Parma, and Teramo; Miane in Treviso; or Mian in Belluno.
MIERAS Catalan
Castilianized form of Mieres, a habitational name from Catalan and Asturian-Leonese Mieres, towns in Catalonia and Asturies.
MIGA Polish
Nickname from a derivative migac ‘to twinkle or wink’.
MIKE Hungarian
Fro, a pet form of the personal name Miklós, Hungarian form of Nicholas, or possibly from a short form of Mihály, Hungarian form of Michael.
MIKÓ Hungarian
From a pet form of the personal names Miklós (Hungarian form of Nicholas) or Mihály (Hungarian form of Michael).
MILK English
Probably from Middle English milk ‘milk’, applied as a metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of milk.In some instances, probably a translation of German Milch, a variant of Slavic Milich or of Dutch Mielke (a pet form of Miele), or a shortening of Slavic Milkovich.
MINAMOTO Japanese
From Japanese 源 (minamoto) meaning "source, origin".
MÍNERVUDÓTTIR Icelandic
Means "daughter of MINERVA" in Icelandic. A famous bearer is Guðrún Eva Mínervudóttir.
MISKINIS Lithuanian
Topographic name from miškinis ‘forest’, ‘forest spirit’. This name is also established in Poland.
MITA Polish
From a pet form of the personal name Dymitr
MITA Japanese
Meaning ‘three rice paddies’, the name is more common in eastern Japan. It is also pronounced Santa or Sanda in western Japan.
MIYA Japanese
The name could mean ‘three arrows’, ‘three valleys’ or ‘shrine’, the latter being the most common. Some occurrences in America are the result of shortening longer names.
MIYAICHI Japanese
From Japanese 宮 (miya) meaning "a shrine; a palace" and 一 (ichi) meaning "one".... [more]
MIYAKE Japanese
Variously written, usually with characters meaning ‘three houses’. In the 5th and 6th centuries, Japanese rulers based in the Yamato region (present-day Nara prefecture) established royal rice-growing estates (miyake) throughout their realm in order to increase their income and consolidate their power... [more]
MIZUTAMA Japanese
From Japanese 水 (mizu) meaning "water" combined with 玉 (tama) meaning "jewel, ball". Other kanji combinations are possible. ... [more]
MKHITARYAN Armenian
From Armenian Mxitʿar combined with -յան (-yan), a patronymic suffix. ... [more]
MO Chinese
According to a study of Mu Ying's Name record, the surname came to be when descendants of the antediluvian ruler Zhuanxu abbreviated the name of his city, Moyangcheng (莫陽城; in modern-day Pingxiang County, Hebei) and took it as their surname... [more]
MOAN Irish
Reduced form of Mohan.
MOAT Scottish
Habitational name from either of two places in Dumfriesshire called Moat, named from Middle English mote ‘moat’, ‘ditch’, originally referring to the whole system of fortifications. In some cases it may have been a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a moated dwelling.
MOATS English
Variant of Moat.
MOK Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese form of Mo.
MOROS Spanish
Habitational name from Moros in Zaragoza province, so named from the plural of moro ‘Moor’, i.e. ‘the place where the Moors live’.
MOSLEY English
Habitational name from any of several places called Mos(e)ley in central, western, and northwestern England. The obvious derivation is from Old English mos ‘peat bog’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’, but the one in southern Birmingham (Museleie in Domesday Book) had as its first element Old English mus ‘mouse’, while one in Staffordshire (Molesleie in Domesday Book) had the genitive case of the Old English byname Moll.
MOTEL French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
MURCIA Spanish
Habitational name from the city Murcia.
MUSIĆ Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian
Patronymic from the personal name Musa, a pet form of the Biblical name Mojsije.
MUSSEY English
Nickname from Middle English mūs ‘mouse’ + ēage ‘eye’.
NA Korean
There is only one Chinese character for the Na surname. Some sources indicate that there are 46 different Na clans, but only two of them can be documented, and it is believed that these two sprang from a common founding ancestor... [more]
NAGAMATSU Japanese
This surname is used as 永松, 長松 or 永末 with 永 (ei, naga.i) meaning "eternity, lengthy, long," 長 (chou, osa, naga.i) meaning "leader, long," 松 (shou, matsu) meaning "pine tree" and 末 (batsu, matsu, sue) meaning "close, end, posterity, powder, tip."
NAGANO Japanese
Japanese: ‘long field’; from a very common place name. The name, which is listed in the Shinsen shōjiroku, is written in two ways, in roughly equal numbers, one being found mostly in eastern Japan and the other in western Japan; both are also found in Okinawa Island... [more]
NAGASHIMA Japanese
This is a Japanese surname, Famous bearers of this surname are Shinji Nagashima (Born as Shin'ichi Nagashima, Is Japanese a manga artist).
NAIFEH Arabic
From a personal name based on Arabic nāfi meaning‘beneficial’, ‘profitable’.This surname is commonly found in America than Arabic speaking countries.
NAKAMATSU Japanese
This surname combines 中 (chuu, ata.ru, uchi, naka) meaning "centre, in(side), mean (not as in the way a person acts), middle" or 仲 (chuu, naka) meaning "go-between, relationship" with 松 (shou, matsu) meaning "pine tree." One bearer of this surname is inventor Yoshirō Nakamatsu (中松 義郎), also known as Dr... [more]
NAPORA Polish
Nickname for an interfering person, Polish napora, derivative of napierać meaning ‘to insist on somebody doing something’.
NARANJO Spanish
Topographic name for someone who lived by an orange grove, from Spanish naranjo ‘orange tree’ (from naranja ‘orange’, Arabic nāránjya), or a habitational name from a place named Naranjo in A Coruña and Códoba provinces... [more]
NARR German
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
NEUWIRTH German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
NOICE English
Variant spelling of Noyce.
NOISETTE French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
NOVO Galician, Portuguese
Nickname from Portuguese and Galician novo ‘new’, ‘young’ (Latin novus). The word was also occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, particularly for a child born after the death of a sibling, and this may also be a source of the surname.
OBLAK Slovene, Croatian
Derived from oblak "cloud".
OCCHIPINTI Sicilian
Derived from Italian occhi "eyes" and pinti "painted", denoting someone with dark eyelashes or with flecked or blood-shot eyes.
ODLAND Norwegian
Habitational name from any of several farmsteads in Rogaland and Hordaland named Odland, from Old Norse Árland, a compound of á ‘small river’ (or another first element of uncertain origin) + land ‘land’, ‘farm’.
OFFICER English (Canadian), English (American, Rare)
Occupational name for the holder of any office, from Anglo-Norman French officer (an agent derivative of Old French office ‘duty’, ‘service’, Latin officium ‘service’, ‘task’).
OHANIAN Armenian
Patronymic from the personal name Ohannes, Armenian equivalent of John.
OHASHI Japanese
From a common habitational name meaning ‘large bridge’. Many bearers may be unrelated; some have Taira or Fujiwara connections. This surname is mostly found in central Japan.
OJALA Estonian, Finnish
From oja meaning ‘ditch’, ‘channel’ + the local suffix -la, a habitational name from any of the numerous farms so named throughout Finland, early settlement of the country having been concentrated along waterways... [more]
OKADA Japanese
Meaning "rice paddy on the hill"; variously written. This is a common place name throughout Japan, but the surname is mostly found in western Japan. ... [more]
ÓLAFSSON Icelandic
Patronymic of the given Ólafur. This surname is given to their sons.
OOSTERHUIS Dutch
Oosterhuis is a Dutch surname meaning "eastern house".
OOSTHUIZEN South African
Came from a village in the Dutch province of North Holland.
ʻŌPŪNUI Hawaiian
From the given name ʻŌpūnui.
ORGAN English
Metonymic occupational name for a player of a musical instrument (any musical instrument, not necessarily what is now known as an organ), from Middle English organ (Old French organe, Late Latin organum ‘device’, ‘(musical) instrument’, Greek organon ‘tool’, from ergein ‘to work or do’).
ORGAN English
From a rare medieval personal name, attested only in the Latinized forms Organus (masculine) and Organa (feminine).
OSEI Western African
Very popular surname in Ghana.
OWNER English
From English owner meaning "a person who owns something".
PAAVOLA Finnish
Habitational name, from a farm so named from the personal name Paavo, vernacular form of Paulus, + the locative ending -la. Both the farm name and the surname can be traced back to the 15th century... [more]
PACETTI Italian
Variant of Pacetto, a pet form of the personal name Pace.
PACIONE Italian
From an augmentative of the personal name Pace.
PACKWOOD English
Habitational name from a place in Warwickshire, so named from the Old English personal name Pac(c)a + wudu ‘wood’.
PADILLA Spanish
Habitational name from any of the various minor places, for example in the provinces of Burgos, Guadalajara, and Valladolid, named from Spanish padilla ‘frying pan’, ‘breadpan’ (Latin patella, a diminutive of patina ‘shallow dish’), a word which was commonly used in the topographical sense of a gentle depression.
PALAU Catalan
From palau meaning "palace", "mansion".
PANAGOS Greek
From a short form of the personal name Panagiotis ‘All Holy’ (an epithet of the Virgin Mary).
PASCH German
Topographic name for a field or meadow which was used at Easter as a playground; etymologically two sources seem to be combined: Latin pascuum ‘pasture’ and Middle Low German pāsche(n) ‘Easter’.
PASH English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
PASHA Albanian, Ottoman Turkish (Anglicized), Turkish (Anglicized)
Pasha or pascha (Ottoman Turkish: پاشا‎, Turkish: paşa), formerly anglicized as bashaw, was a higher rank in the Ottoman Empire political and military system, typically granted to governors, generals and dignitaries and others... [more]
PEÑARANDA Spanish
Habitational name from places in Burgos and Salamanca named Peñaranda.
PERLSTEIN Jewish
Ornamental name composed of German Perle ‘pearl’ + Stein ‘stone’.
PETRÍČEK Czech
Derived from a diminutive of Petr.
PETROSIAN Armenian (Expatriate)
Variant transcription of Petrosyan used by Armenians living outside Armenia.
PIANA Italian
Topographic name from piana ‘plain’, ‘level ground’, from Latin planus, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word.
PIANO Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived on a plain or plateau, Italian piano (Latin planum, from the adjective planus ‘flat’, ‘level’).
PICA Italian, Catalan
Nickname for a gossipy or garrulous person, from the central-southern Italian word pica ‘magpie’. Compare Picazo.Catalan: habitational name from any of the numerous places called Pica.Catalan: from either pica ‘pointed object’ (weapon, etc.) or a derivative of picar ‘to prick’.
PINK English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
PIQUÉ Catalan
A famous bearer of this surname is Spanish/Catalan footballer Gerard Piqué.
PISA Italian
Habitational name from the city of Pisa in Tuscany. The city was probably founded by Greek colonists, but before coming under Roman control it was in the hands of the Etruscans, who probably gave it its name... [more]
PISULA Polish, Lithuanian
Informal nickname for a scribe or clerk, from a derivative of Polish pisać ‘to write’.
POBANZ German
Nickname for a braggart or bogeyman, of uncertain Slavic origin.
POBLETE Spanish (Latin American)
Habitational name from Poblete in the province of Ciudad Real.
POET Scottish
Of uncertain origin, probably a variant of Pate.
PÖGE German
German cognate of Page.
POH German
From a dialect word for standard German Pfau ‘peacok’, a nickname for a vain person or for someone with a strutting gait.
POKRYWKA Polish
Nickname from pokrywka meaning ‘cover’, ‘lid’.
POLAND English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
POOL English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pool or pond, Middle English pole (Old English pōl), or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Poole in Dorset, South Pool in Devon, and Poole Keynes in Gloucestershire.
PREGLER German
Nickname for a chatterer or grumbler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German breglen ‘to chatter’, ‘complain’, ‘yell’, ‘roar’.
PRUE English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
PUDWILL German
Of Slavic origin, habitational name from Podewils in Pomerania.
PUENTE Spanish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named Puente, from puente ‘bridge’.
PUERTO Spanish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named Puerto, in most cases from puerto ‘harbor’ (from Latin portus ‘harbor’, ‘haven’).
PUETT English (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
PUSEY English
Habitational name from Pusey in Oxfordshire (formerly in Berkshire), so called from Old English peose, piosu ‘pea(s)’ + ēg ‘island’, ‘low-lying land’, or from Pewsey in Wiltshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Pevesie, apparently from the genitive case of an Old English personal name Pefe, not independently attested + Old English ēg ‘island’.
PUSEY French
Habitational name form Pusey in Haute-Saône, so named from a Gallo-Roman personal name, Pusius, + the locative suffix -acum.
PÜTT German
Habitational name from any of several places so named in Rhineland, Westphalia, and Pomerania, but in most cases a topographic name from Middle Low German putte ‘pit’, ‘well’, ‘puddle’, ‘pond’.
PYBURN English (?)
Apparently from some lost or minor place so named. 1881 British census has 109; KH.
RAAD Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for an adviser, counselor, or member of a town council, from raad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
RAFFENSPERGER German
Altered spelling of Ravensburger or Ravensberger, a habitational name for someone from Ravensburg in Württemberg, but there are a number of similar surnames, for example Raffenberg, a farm name near Hamm, and Raffsberger.
RAGUSA Italian
Habitational name from Ragusa in Sicily, or from the ancient city of Dubrovnik on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia (Italian name Ragusa).
RAHE German
Nickname for a rough individual, from a North German variant of Rauh.
RAHMAN Arabic, Bengali, Urdu
From the given name Rahman.
RAINWATER English (American)
Americanized form of the German family name Reinwasser, possibly a topographic name for someone who lived by a source of fresh water, from Middle High German reine ‘pure’ + wazzer ‘water’.
RAISCH German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German rīsch, rūsch ‘reed’, ‘rush’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near a reed bed, or perhaps a metonymic occupational name for someone who used or harvested reeds... [more]
RAISH English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Raisch.
RAITER German
Occupational name for a taxman or accountant, from an agent derivative of Middle High German reiten ‘to reckon’, ‘to calculate’.
RAK Polish, Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, Hungarian, Jewish
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, Hungarian (Rák), and Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from Slavic rak ‘crab’, ‘lobster’, or ‘crayfish’. This was applied as an occupational name for someone who caught and sold crayfish, crabs, or lobsters, or as a nickname to someone thought to resemble such a creature... [more]
RAKITIĆ Croatian (Rare), Serbian (Rare)
Famous bearer of this surname is Croatian footballer Ivan Rakitić.
RASTOGI Indian, Hindi
Possibly derived from Rohtas, the name of a district in Bihar, India, itself from the name of a Hindu deity.
RECK German
Nickname from Middle High German recke ‘outlaw’ or ‘fighter’. North German and Westphalian: from Middle Low German recke ‘marsh’, ‘waterlogged ground’, hence a topographic name, or a habitational name from a place named with this term.
RIDDELL Scottish, English
From a Norman personal name, Ridel. Reaney explains this as a nickname from Old French ridel ‘small hill’ (a diminutive of ride ‘fold’, of Germanic origin), but a more probable source is a Germanic personal name derived from the element rīd ‘ride’.
RITA Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan
From the female personal name Rita, a reduced form of MargharitaMargaret’, chosen in particular in honor of a 15th-century Italian saint who bore the name in this form.
RUCCI Italian
Patronymic from the personal name Ruccio, from a short form of various pet names formed with this suffix, as for example Gasparuccio (from Gaspari) or Baldassaruccio (from Baldasare).
RUCINSKI Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Ruciany in Siedlce.
RZASA Polish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pond where duckweed grew, from Polish rzasa ‘duckweed’.
RZONCA Polish
Nickname from Polish dialect rzonca, standard Polish rzodca ‘land steward’.
RZUCIDLO Polish
Nickname for an eager or ebullient person from a derivative of rzucic ‘to throw’, ‘to throw oneself at someone’.
SA Korean
There are three Chinese characters associated with this surname. Two of these are extremely rare and are not treated here. The remaining Sa surname is also quite unusual. There are two distinct clans, one of Kyŏngsang South Province’s Kŏch’ang County and the other originating with a refugee from Ming China who came to Korea near the end of the Koryŏ period (ad 918–1392).
Portuguese, Galician
Variant spelling of Saa, a habitational name from any of the numerous places named Saa, mainly in northern Portugal and Galicia.
SAFER Jewish
Variant of Safir.
SAFIR Jewish, Yiddish
Ornamental name from northeastern Yiddish dialect safir and German Saphir ‘sapphire’.
SALDÍVAR Spanish
Castilianized variant of Basque Zaldibar, a habitational name from a place so named in Biscay province. The place name is of uncertain derivation: it may be from zaldu ‘wood’, ‘copse’ or from zaldi ‘horse’ + ibar ‘water meadow’, ‘fertile plain’.
SALIMI Persian, Arabic
From the given name Salim.
SAMAHA Arabic
Derived from Arabic سَمْح (samḥ) meaning "magnanimous, generous".
SAN JOSÉ Spanish
Habitational name from any of the places named for a local church or shrine dedicated to St. Joseph.... [more]
SANZ German, Spanish
From a short form, Sando, of a Germanic personal name formed with sand "true" and variant of Sancho.... [more]
SAPIR Hebrew
Means "sapphire" in Hebrew.
SAPIRO Jewish
Varient of Shapiro.
SARAFIAN Armenian
Patronymic from Arabic ̣saraf ‘money changer’, ‘banker’.
SASTRY Indian
Hindu (Brahman) name, from Sanskrit šāstrī ‘versed in the Shastras’ (from šāstra ‘book of rules’, ‘religious treatise’).
SAXENA Indian, Hindi
Believed to mean "friend of the army" from Sanskrit सखा (sakhā) meaning "friend, companion" and सेना (sénā) meaning "army".
SAYED Muslim
From a personal name based on Arabic sayyid ‘lord’, ‘master’, ‘chief’. This is a title of respect used for the descendants of Fatima, daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.
SCHAAF German
Metonymic occupational name for a shepherd, from Middle High German schāf ‘sheep’. In some cases it may have been a nickname for someone thought to resemble a sheep, or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a sheep... [more]
SCHOENWETTER German
German (Schönwetter): nickname for someone with a happy disposition, from Middle High German schœn ‘beautiful’, ‘fine’, ‘nice’ + wetter ‘weather’.