Submitted Surnames from Other Sources

usage
source
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Ćibarić Croatian
Son of Ćibar
Čičak Croatian
Means ''burdock, thistle''.
Çiçek Turkish
Means "flower, blossom" in Turkish.
Cicero Italian
From the Italian cicero "pea," "chickpea," or "lentil."
Cichy Polish, Slovak, Czech
Meaning "quiet" or "silent".
Çifligu Albanian (Rare)
This surname derives from the Albanian city Çiflig. The word Çiflig comes from the Turkish term for land management in the Ottoman Empire. Albania was under Ottoman rule for almost 500 years and has many cities and surnames that derive from Turkish terms.
Cilliërs Afrikaans
Brought to South Africa by settlers of French decent some time in the past 300 years. Sometimes also a given name for boys.
Çimen Turkish
Means "grass, lawn, turf" in Turkish.
Çınar Turkish
Means "plane tree" in Turkish (genus Platanus), derived from Persian چنار (chenar).
Ciora Romanian (Rare)
Derived from a Romanian place name.
Ciotola Italian
Possibly a diminutive of Ciotta.
Ciruela Filipino, Spanish (Rare)
From Spanish ciruela meaning "plum".
Cīrulis Latvian
Means "lark".
Citlalpopoca Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl meaning "smoking star" or "comet".
Citrine Jewish
An invented Jewish name based on Yiddish tsitrin "lemon tree".
Ciuraru Romanian
Derived from the Romanian word cioară meaning "crow".
Clague Manx
Shortened Anglicization of either Gaelic Mac Luathóg "son of Luathóg", itself derived from a diminutive of Gaelic luath, Manx leah "swift", or from Gaelic Mac Laoghóg "son of Laoghóg", which is derived from a diminutive of Gaelic laogh and Manx lheiy "calf".
Claine Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Gille Eathain, a patronymic name meaning "son of the servant of Saint John."
Clairmont English
Means "bright hill."
Clattenburg English (?)
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
Clavell French, Catalan
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
Clavero English, Catalan
1 English: occupational name from Old French clavier ‘doorkeeper’ (from Latin clavis ‘key’).... [more]
Cleburne English
Cleburne is a surname of Northern English and Southern Scottish Anglo-Saxon origin.
Cleland Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
Clerihew Scottish
A Scottish surname of unknown origin and meaning. A clerihew is a humorous or satirical verse consisting of two rhyming couplets in lines of irregular metre about someone who is named in the poem. It was invented by the British author Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956; Clerihew was his mother's maiden name)... [more]
Clester English (American)
Probably an Americanized form of Dutch Klooster .
Clinkenbeard Low German
Possibly an Americanized form of North German Klingebiel, a variant of Klingbeil.
Clinker English (British, ?)
Possibly a varient of Clinger.
Clisby English
Surname originating in the village of Cleasby in North Yorkshire's Richmondshire district.
Clores Spanish, Portuguese
Portuguese form of Flores
Clow English
Variant of Clough.
Clue English
Variant of Clough, traditionally found in Devonshire.
Clute Dutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
Clutterbuck English, Dutch (Anglicized, ?)
English surname of unknown origin, possibly a corrupted form of a Dutch surname derived from Dutch klateren "to clatter" and beek "brook". The original surname may have been brought to England by Flemish weavers whom Edward III brought to England in the 14th century to teach their techniques to the English, or by Huguenots who fled the Netherlands in the 16th century to escape religious persecution... [more]
Cluxton English
Altered form of English Claxton.
Cmiel Polish
From the Polish noun 'trzmiel', which means "bumblebee."
Coach Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of McCaig.
Coard English, Northern Irish
Derived from Old French corde "string", a metonymic occupational name for a maker of cord or string, or a nickname for an habitual wearer of decorative ties and ribbons.
Cobello Medieval Galician (Archaic)
This surname may indicate the name Jacob or Tiago.
Coberley English
Possibly from a village in England called Coberley
Cocicova Russian
Feminine form of Cocicov.
Cociña Galician
It literally means "kitchen".
Codreanu Romanian, Moldovan
A common surname in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
Coffee Irish
Variant of Coffey.
Coffey Irish
Ireland County Cork
Cohitmingao Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano kuhit meaning "pole (used to reach or hook something)" and mingaw meaning "deserted, lonely".
Colbourn English
English: variant spelling of Colburn .
Coldman English
Probably a variant of Coleman with intrusive 'd'.
Colella Italian
Diminutive of personal name Cola, a short form of Nicola 1, an Italian equivalent of Nicholas... [more]
Coles English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
Collen English
Variant of Colin.
Collet Manx
Variant of Corlett.
Collines French
French for "hillbanks".
Collinsworth English
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
Colmenares Spanish
It literally means "apiaries", denoting someone who either worked at some or lived near some.
Colomb French
from Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columbus) applied as a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of pigeons or doves... [more]
Colombe French
Either from the given name Colombe or a habitational name from a place in France named La Colombe... [more]
Colston English
Colston means “Coal town settlement.” It is also a variant of Colton.
Combeferre Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
Comeaux French (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French Comeau.
Čomor Bosnian (Rare), Bosnian
Čomor is a rare surname in the world and has (mostly) Herzegovenian origins. You can find most Čomors in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Only 400 people bare the surname. Čomor has two meanings; First meaning is 'buttercup' and the second one is 'a disease that comes from eating fatty (oily) foods, fever with a constant feeling of nausea and disgust'
Conahan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham 2).
Conceição Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of Concepción.
Concepción Spanish
Means "conception'' in Spanish, in reference to the Immaculate Conception of Virgin Mary.
Concepcion Spanish (Filipinized)
Unaccented form of Concepción primarily used in the Philippines and America.
Conde Spanish
1 Spanish and Portuguese: “nickname from the title of rank conde ‘count’, a derivative of Latin comes, comitis ‘companion’.”... [more]
Condrau Romansh
Derived from the given name Cundrau.
Cone Irish
Reduced form of McCone.
Cong Tang Ton Nu Vietnamese
Often written with the middle two words uncapitalized when with a full name; example: Con tang ton Nu Hue Hue. The first name is Hue Hue, and the surname is Cong tang ton Nu. It is a female royal Vietnamese surname created by the Nguyen Dynasty.
Conklin Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
Conlan Irish
Variant of Conlon.
Conlee Irish
Variant spelling of Conley
Conlin Irish
Variant of Conlon.
Conlon Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
Conran Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
Contemplacion Spanish (Philippines, Rare)
Derived from Spanish contemplación meaning "contemplation." ... [more]
Coogan Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
Cookinham Jewish (Americanized)
This has the form of an English habitational name; however, there is no record of any such place name in the British Isles, and the surname does not appear in present-day records. It is probably an Americanized form of Jewish Guggenheim .
Cooley Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
Coon Scottish, Irish
Variant of Cunningham 1, Coonaghan and other names from the same family
Coors German
Variant of Cords.
Cooter English
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of Cotter, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
Copeland English
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
Copernicus History
Nicolaus Copernicus is a mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe... [more]