Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the meaning contains the keywords supernatural or animal.
usage
meaning
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Abella Catalan, Galician
Means "bee" in Catalan and Galician, used as a nickname for a small, active person or an occupational name for a beekeeper.
Abeysinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit अभय (abhaya) meaning "fearless" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Abiko Japanese
From 安 (a) "peaceful, cheap, rested, low" or 我 (a) meaning "I, me, myself, selfish, oneself, ego" combined with 孫 (bi) meaning "grandchild", and 子 (ko) meaning "child, sign of the rat"... [more]
Adney English
Habitational name from Adeney in Shropshire, named in Old English as Eadwynna ey "island of a woman called Eadwynn". English: from a Middle English pet form of Adam... [more]
Aetós Greek
"Eagle" - in Greek, spelled αετός.
Águila Spanish
From águila "eagle" (Latin aquila). This is either a nickname for a haughty man or one with an aquiline nose, or a habitational name from a place in Salamanca province called Águila.
Aguilera Spanish
Habitational name from a location in Soria province, Spain, named Aguilera, derived from Spanish aguilera meaning "eagle's nest". A famous bearer is American singer Christina Aguilera (1980-).
Aiba Japanese
From Japanese 相 (ai) meaning "mutual" or 饗 (ai) meaning "banquet", combined with 馬 (ba) meaning "horse", 場 (ba) meaning "location", 羽 (ba) meaning "feathers", 庭 (ba) meaning "courtyard" or 葉 (ba) meaning "leaf".
Aitiņš Latvian
Derived from the word aita, meaning “sheep”.
Ajala Edo
Means "chief of the horses".
Akerregi Basque
Basque surname meaning "goat's hillside", composed of aker and -egi, meaning "goat" and "hillside" respectively.
Akkuş Turkish
Means "white bird" from Turkish ak meaning "white" and kuş meaning "bird".
Alfani Italian
(or Alfano) three possibilities: from the German word halfer ("helper"), from a place called Alfano, which is supposed to be from the Arab al fannan ("wild donkey"), and Alfana is the name of a race (as in type) of Arab horses, so could be someone related to horses.
Alimasag Filipino, Cebuano
Means "flower crab" in Cebuano.
Allgeier German
The harried officials at Ellis Island began to assign surnames based upon the pronunciation of the name by the immigrant, rather than attempting to ferret out the actual spelling. ... [more]
Almog Hebrew
From the given name Almog, means "coral" in Hebrew.
Amarasinghe Sinhalese
From Sanskrit अमर (amara) meaning "immortal, undying" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Amito Japanese
Means "doorway with an insect net" in Japanese.
Ammazzalorso Italian
From the profession of bear hunter, meaning literally "slaughter the bear".
Ammer German, English (Rare)
This surname may be derived from Middle High German amer which means "bunting (as in the bird)." As such, it is used as a nickname for someone with a fine voice or someone who is a flamboyant dresser.... [more]
Amsler German (Swiss)
Derived from German Amsel "(European) blackbird", this was an occupational name for a fowler (bird catcher).
Anardu Italian
From a dialectical variant of Italian anatra "duck (bird)".
Anay-ool Tuvan
Derived from Tuvan анай (anay) meaning "goat, kid" combined with оол (ool) meaning "son, boy".
Angerjas Estonian
Angerjas is an Estonian surname meaning "eel".
Angioni Italian
From Sardinian angioni "lamb", denoting a shepherd, or perhaps a nickname.
Angius Italian
Meaning uncertain, possibly linked to Sardinian angioni "lamb", Ancient Greek άγγος (àngos) "vessel, jug" or άγχω (ankho) "to strangle; anguish, stress", or from a modification of Latin balneum (see Bagni) "bath", indicating a place with hot springs.
Anni Estonian
Anni is an Estonian surname possibly derived from "anne" meaning "aptitude for" and "talent"; or "hani" meaning "goose".
Anouilh French
From Catalan anull, meaning "slow worm". It is originally a nickname given to a spineless and slow person. The French author Jean Anouilh is a famous bearer of this surname.
Aquilina Maltese
Nickname for a person with eagle-like features or a person who owned an eagle, derived from Latin aquila meaning "eagle".
Ardern English
Means "eagle valley" or "gravel valley". From Old English ear "gravel" or eran "eagle" and denu "valley". Also a variant of Arden.
Arı Turkish
Means "bee" or "clean, pure" in Turkish.
Arimao Filipino, Maranao
From Maranao arimaw meaning "lion".
Ariyasinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit आर्य (arya) meaning "noble" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Arlianionak Belarusian
Double diminutive of Belarusian арол (arol) meaning "eagle".
Armijo Spanish
Derived from the Spanish adjetive "armigero", meaning "one who bears arms". First found in the Northern Region of Spain in Cantabria. Alternate spellings include: Armijos, Armigo, and Armija.
Arnett English
Derived from Arnold, a pet name perhaps. Also could be from /arn/ "eagle" and /ett/, a diminutive.
Arol Belarusian
Means "eagle" in Belarusian.
Arundel English
English surname which comes from two distinct sources. Either it was derived from a place name meaning "horehound valley" in Old English (from harhune "horehound (a plant)" and dell "valley"), or it was from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond "swallow", which was originally a Norman nickname given to someone resembling a swallow.
Arzamendia Basque
"mountain bear"
Aslanyan Armenian
Derived from Turkic arslan meaning "lion".
Asnicar Italian
From Cimbrian haazo "hare" and ékke "hill, rise".
Assaratanakul Thai
From Thai อัสสะ (atsa) meaning "horse", รัตนะ (ratana) meaning "precious gem; precious jewel", and กุล, a transcription of Pali kula meaning "clan".
Astore Italian
Derived from Italian astore meaning "goshawk", which is a bird of prey that was used for hunting in the Middle Ages. The surname had first started out as a nickname: either for a falconer, or for a person who had aquiline features or who was cunning by nature.
Asui Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 蛙 (a) meaning "frog" and 吹 (sui) meaning "puff"
Aten Frisian, Dutch
The Frisian name Aten means "Noble Wolf". The name was probably given to lesser lords. As noble would mean nobility. As wolf was always a symbol of a warrior, or hunter. Usually Nobles who were also warriors, were lesser lords... [more]
Atmaca Turkish
Means "hawk" in Turkish, referring specifically to the sparrow hawk (genus Accipiter).
Atzori Italian
Possibly from Spanish azor "goshawk", otherwise a variant of Atzeri.
Audet French
Southern French nickname from Gascon dialect audet "bird", variant of standard Occitan ausèl (modern French oiseau).
Aul Estonian
Aul is an Estonian surname meaning "long-tailed duck" (Clangula hyemalis).
Auman Filipino, Cebuano
Derived from Cebuano awom meaning "mole".
Ausley English (Modern)
Rare surname which was from an English place name in which the second element is Old English leah "wood, clearing". The first element may be hors "horse" (in which case the name likely referred to a place where horses were put out to pasture) or the river name Ouse (ultimately from the ancient British root ud- "water").
Aviles Catalan
From Catalan avile "bird".
Ayohua Nahuatl
Meaning uncertain, possibly from ayotli "squash, pumpkin" or ayotl "turtle" combined with the possessive suffix -hua, or from ayohua "to fill with water".
Azcatl Nahuatl
Means "ant" in Nahuatl.
Babraitis Lithuanian
From babras, a variant of bebras meaning "beaver".
Babrauskas Lithuanian
Ultimately from the Balto-Slavic element *bébrus meaning "beaver". It is possibly an adaptation of Polish Bobrowski, or a related Slavic surname.
Baca Spanish
From Spanish vaca meaning "cow".
Bacigalupo Italian
From Ligurian bacigare "to beat with a stick" and lupo "wolf", or from Genoese basigâ "to swing, to tease" and lupo "wolf". Possibly a nickname for someone considered courageous or cowardly, or an occupational name for a hunter.
Baer German
Derived from Old High German bero "bear".
Bagaoisan Filipino, Tagalog
From Tagalog bagwisan meaning "to grow wings" or "to pull out the wing feathers (of a bird)".
Bagatsing Filipino
Filipinized form of Bhagat Singh, a combination of Sanskrit भगत (bhagat) meaning "devotee, follower" combined with सिंह (siṃhá) meaning "lion". A notable bearer was Ramon Bagatsing (1916-2006), the 19th Mayor of Manila who was of Indian descent.
Bagge Swedish
From Swedish bagge "ram (male sheep)".
Baio Italian
From a nickname for someone with light brown or reddish-brown hair or beard, from baio meaning "bay horse", ultimately derived from Late Latin badius meaning "red-brown".
Bajwa Punjabi
Derived from Persian باز والا (bâz vâlâ) meaning "great hawk, great falcon".
Banogon Filipino, Cebuano
Means "hawklike" in Cebuano, ultimately from banog meaning "hawk".
Baranchuk Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian
From Баран (baran) meaning "ram".
Baranko Ukrainian
From Ukrainian Баран (baran) meaning "ram".
Baranov Russian
From Russian баран (baran) meaning "ram, sheep".
Baranski Polish
Means "son of Baran (ram)" in Polish.
Bar Yonah Hebrew
Means "son of Jonah" or "son of the dove" from Hebrew yonah "dove".
Bazzaty Ossetian
Derived from Georgian ბაზი (bazi) meaning "falcon" or from a given name derived from Tatar базу (bazu) meaning "to dare" (given in hopes that a son would become a warrior).
Bear English
From the Middle English nickname Bere meaning "bear" (Old English bera, which is also found as a byname), or possibly from a personal name derived from a short form of the various Germanic compound names with this first element... [more]
Beccaria Italian
From beccaro "butcher", ultimately from becco "goat".
Becerra Spanish, Galician
Nickname probably for a high-spirited person from becerra "young cow, heifer". It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a cowherd.
Bee English
From Middle English be meaning "bee", Old English beo, hence a nickname for an energetic or active person or a metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper.
Belkin Russian
Patronymic from the nickname Belka meaning "squirrel" (a derivative of bely "white", referring to the animal's white stomach).
Bellock English, Irish
Meaning "young bull". It was a nickname for energetic people, or those who owned bulls.
Belovuk Serbian
Means "white wolf" in Serbian.
Belyakov Russian
Derived from the Russian word belyak meaning "white rabbit".... [more]
Belyakova Russian
Derived from the Russian word belyak meaning "white rabbit".... [more]
Ben-Gurion Hebrew
Means "son of the lion cub", from Hebrew גוּר (gur) meaning "lion cub, young lion". A notable bearer was the Polish-born David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973; real name David Grün), the founding father of Israel who also served as the country's first prime minister.
Bennouna Arabic (Maghrebi)
Most likely from Arabic بن (bin) meaning "son" and the given name Nouna, which may have been derived from an Arabic word meaning "whale, big fish" or "sabre, sword". Alternately, it may be from an Arabic name for a variety of melon... [more]
Bermejo Spanish
Originally a nickname for a man with red hair or a ruddy complexion, from Spanish bermejo "reddish, ruddy" (itself from Latin vermiculus "little worm", from vermis "worm", since a crimson dye was obtained from the bodies of worms).
Bernheim Jewish
From the Germanic elements bern meaning "bear" and heim meaning "home".
Bernier French
From the personal name Bernier composed of the ancient Germanic elements bern "bear" and hari "army". Compare Barney and Barnier.
Bernthal Jewish
Ornamental name derived from the Yiddish given name Ber meaning "bear" and German thal meaning "valley". A famous bearer is American actor Jon Bernthal (1976-).
Berongoy Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano barungoy meaning "black-finned flying fish" (genus Cypselurus).
Berri German (Swiss), Romansh
Derived from Old High German bero "bear".
Bertarelli Italian
Probably from a given name containing the Germanic root behrat "bright" or Celtic berta "to carry, to bear".
Berwald German, Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Originally derived from the given name Bernwald, composed of Old High German bern, bero "bear" and wald "ruler"... [more]
Beste French, English
Nickname from Middle English beste Old French beste "beast animal" (especially those used for food or work) applied either as a metonymic occupational name for someone who looked after beasts such as a herdsman or as a nickname for someone thought to resemble an animal... [more]
Bezerra Portuguese
Means "young cow, heifer" in Portuguese.
Bhaer German
Likely a variant of German Baer, meaning "bear". A notable bearer is character Friedrich Bhaer, Jo's husband in Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.
Bivol Romanian, Moldovan
Meaning "buffalo".
Björn Swedish
Means "bear" in Swedish. Either taken directly from the given name (see Björn) or from a nickname for a big, hairy person. It may also be derived from a place named with the element björn.
Björnberg Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish björn meaning "bear" and berg meaning "mountain".
Blasquez Spanish
From the medieval diminutive Velasco, from the Basque word 'bela' meaning "crow", and the diminutive suffix 'sko'.
Bledig Welsh
"like a wolf"
Bobeck Swedish, German, Jewish, Slavic
A respelling of the Swedish Bobäck, an ornamental name composed of the elements bo meaning "farm" and bäck meaning "stream".... [more]
Bobrov Russian
Patronymic surname derived from Russian бобр (bobr) or бобёр (bobyor) both meaning "beaver".
Bobrownik Polish
From bobrownik, meaning "beaver hunter" or "beaver breeder."
Bocboc Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano bukbok meaning "clobber, maul" or "woodboring insect, weevil".
Boccalupo Italian
Possibly from an Italian saying, in bocca al lupo, literally "in the mouth of the wolf", a way of wishing good luck.
Bodily Anglo-Saxon
A habitational name from the parish of Budleigh, near Exeter in Devon or Baddeley Green in Staffordshire. From the Old English budda, meaning "beetle" and leah, meaning "wood" or "clearing", also known as a glade... [more]
Boğa Turkish
Means "bull" in Turkish.
Bolzonaro Italian
Occupational name for a person who operated a battering ram, derived from Italian bolzone literally meaning "battering ram".
Bonhoc Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano bunhok meaning "bird louse" (a type of small biting insect).
Bool English
This surname derives from the Old English pre 7th Century bula, or the Medieval English bulle, bolle, meaning "bull", and was given as a nickname to one with great physical strength.
Borjigin Mongolian
This is the name of a Mongol sub-clan, of which Genghis Khan was part of. A suggested origin is a Turkic-language term borčïqïn meaning "man with dark blue eyes", though this is somewhat dubious... [more]
Borsok Russian, Jewish, German (Austrian)
Pronouced "Boar-sook"... [more]
Bozkurt Turkish
Means "grey wolf" from Turkish boz meaning "grey" and kurt meaning "wolf".
Bracco Italian
Either a nickname derived from Calabrian braccu meaning "small, chubby", or probably for someone thought to resemble a hunting dog, from Italian bracco literally meaning "hunting dog, bloodhound"... [more]
Brancaleone Italian
Derived from the medieval Italian masculine given name Brancaleone, which means either "a lion's paw" or "he who captures the lion". In the case of the former meaning, the name is derived from Italian branca meaning "paw, claw" combined with Italian leone meaning "lion"... [more]
Brandenburg German (East Prussian, Rare)
From a state in eastern Germany, formerly known as Prussia, containing the capital city of Berlin. Ancient. Associated with the Margravate (Dukedom) of Brandenburg, the seat of power in the Holy Roman Empire... [more]
Brau Italian
Meaning uncertain, possibly from the dialectical term brau, meaning "wild, untamed" in Sardinian and "brave, fierce" or "bull" in Catalan, or from blau "blue, turquoise".
Brick Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic "descendant of Broc", i.e. "badger" (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric "descendant of Breac", a personal name meaning "freckled"... [more]
Buaya Filipino, Cebuano
Means "crocodile" in Cebuano.
Bucao Filipino, Cebuano
Means "hawk-owl" (genus Ninox) in Cebuano.
Bucks English
Variant of "Buck"; a deer.
Budd English
Originated from the Old English personal name Budda, from the word budda, which means "beetle" or "to swell." Specifically of Celtic Welsh origin.
Buffa Italian
From Sicilian buffa, "toad". May alternately derive from Rebuffo.
Buglass English
Possibly from the Booklawes region near Melrose, Roxburgshire, originally spelt "Buke-Lawes" (lit. "buck/stag" combined with "low ground"); otherwise from the Gaelic words buidhe - "yellow" and glas - "green".
Bülbül Turkish
Means "nightingale" in Turkish.
Bulstrode English
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
Bunal Filipino, Cebuano
Means "hit, strike (with a bat or club)" in Cebuano.
Burney English, Irish
Form of the French place name of 'Bernay' or adapted from the personal name Bjorn, ultimately meaning "bear".
Buscemi Sicilian
Name for someone originally from the town of Buscemi in Sicily, derived from the Arabic toponym قلعة أبي شامة‎ (qal'at 'abi shama) meaning "castle of the man with the mole‎" or "castle of (the family of) Abi Shama".
Butragueño Spanish
Originally denoted someone who was from either the town of Buitrago del Lozoya in Madrid, or from Buitrago in Soria, Castile and León, Spain, both derived Spanish buitre meaning "vulture" (see Buitrago)... [more]
Buttiġieġ Maltese
From Maltese bu t-tiġieġ literally meaning "father of chickens", referring to a poulterer or someone who owned chickens.
Buttram English (American, Rare), English (British, Rare)
Possibly derived from the German cognate Bertram, from the Germanic elements beraht (meaning "bright"), and hrabn (meaning "raven")... [more]
Bux Anglo-Saxon
From boc, meaning a beach, or beech. Sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Buxton, in Derbyshire, Buxhall, in Suffolk, or Buxted in Sussex; variant of "Buck", a deer.
Bykov Russian
From byk, meaning "bull".
Cabaco Spanish, Filipino
From spanish word cabaco means "horse"
Caballo Spanish, Spanish (Latin American)
Derived from the Spanish word cabello, ultimately derived from the Latin word caballus, meaning "horse". This denoted someone who worked in a farm that took care of horses, or someone who had personality traits attributed to a horse, such as energetic behaviour.
Cadeddu Italian
From Sardinian cadeddu "puppy, whelp", ultimately from Latin catellus.
Cahuet Picard
Nickname from Picard caüe "tawny owl".
Çakal Turkish
Means "jackal" (figuratively "sly, sneaky, wily") in Turkish.
Calandra Italian
from calandra "skylark" (from Latin calandra) probably a nickname for someone with a fine singing voice.
Camilleri Maltese, Italian
Derived from Italian cammelliere meaning "camel driver".
Can Mayan
from the word kaan meaning "snake"
Cancer Various, Indonesian, Spanish
From Latin “Crab”. Mostly used in Indonesia.
Cangussu Brazilian
The surname Cangussu has its origins in the Tupi-Guarani language and is a variation of Akangu’su, which means "jaguar".
Cantagallo Italian
From the name of a town, or possibly a nickname meaning "singing rooster".
Cantalupi Italian
Denoting a person from Cantalupo, the name of several towns and counties near wooded areas where wolves could be heard. From Italian canta "singing" and lupo "wolf". ... [more]
Cantellow English
Means "person from Canteleu, Canteloup, etc.", the name of various places in northern France ("song of the wolf").
Canteloup French
Name of several places in France. The surname means "Song of the Wolf" from canta and loup as in "place where the wolves howl".
Caouette French (Quebec)
Altered form of French Cahouet, itself a regional form of chat-huant meaning "screech owl", hence a nickname referring to the bird.
Čáp Czech
Means "stork" in Czech.
Čapek Czech
Derived from a diminutive of Czech cáp meaning "stork", applied as a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a stork. In some cases the family name may have derived from a heraldic symbol.
Capra Italian
From the Latin word capra meaning "nanny goat." This was a name originally borne by shepherds / goat herders.
Capraro Italian
Occupational name for a goatherd, derived from Italian capra meaning "goat".
Capricorne French
Derived from the Latin word (Capricornus) meaning "horned like a goat". Probably a nickname for an ambitious person.
Caprio Italian
from Latin caprae ‘goats’ or possibly from Greek kapros "(wild) boar" and so a metonymic occupational name for a goatherd or swineherd or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a goat or boar.
Carabuz Romanian
Carabuz is a combination betwen 2 Romanian words, ,,cărăbuș" the Romanian form of ,,beetle" and ,,autobuz" the Romanian form of ,,bus"
Carioto Italian
It means “deer” and originates from Italy the surname is considerably rare the total number is still unknown
Carneiro Portuguese, Galician
Means "ram" in Portuguese and Galician, either used as an occupational name for a shepherd or a habitational name for someone from any of various places called Carneiro.
Carrogu Italian
Possibly from Sardinian carroga "crow, carrion crow".
Carveth English
From the village of Carveth, from Cornish Karvergh meaning "fort of horses".
Casley English
Derived from Old English C(e)atta, a personal name meaning "cat" and leah "woodland, clearing"."
Catchpole English
Meant "bailiff, especially (originally) one who could seize domestic animals in lieu of tax or debt" (from Anglo-Norman cachepol, from cacher "to chase" + pol "chicken").
Cats Dutch, Jewish
Habitational name for a person from the village of Kats in Zeeland, Holland, or a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a cat, derived from Middle Dutch catte literally meaning "cat"... [more]
Catt English
Nickname from the animal, Middle English catte "cat". The word is found in similar forms in most European languages from very early times (e.g. Gaelic cath, Slavic kotu). Domestic cats were unknown in Europe in classical times, when weasels fulfilled many of their functions, for example in hunting rodents... [more]
Cattell Anglo-Saxon, French, Old Norse
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Old Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
Cattley English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
Cattrall English
This surname is of Old Scandinavian origin, is an English locational name from Catterall, near Garstang in Lancashire, which appeared as "Catrehala" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and "Caterhale" in the Book of Fees of 1212... [more]
Caune Latvian
Derived from the word cauna meaning "marten".
Caverly English
English surname, a variant of the English surname Calverley, itself derived from the Old English calf "calf" and leag "field, clearing".
Cavill English
Derived from Cavil, a place located in the East Riding of Yorkshire in northern England, named from Old English ca meaning "jackdaw" and feld meaning "open country". It is borne by the British actor Henry Cavill (1983-).
Cawood English
Traditional English habitational surname meaning "jackdaw wood" from the Old English ca referring to 'jackdaw' (a member of the crow family), and wudu 'wood'.
Çaylak Turkish
Means "kite (the bird)" or "inexperienced" in Turkish.
Cecalupo Italian
Possibly means "blind wolf".
Celudrus Persian Mythology (Rare, Archaic, ?)
It is a mystical name of a fiction book by an author named Giselle Viatcheslav, meaning "DRAGON DIAMOND GUARDIAN OF EVIL". It emerged shortly after a millennium dragon gives birth to a child with vampire blood on the sacred celestial moon... [more]
Ceretti Italian (Tuscan), Medieval Italian (Tuscan)
The surname Cerri is derived from the Italian word cerro, which means bitter or Turkey oak. Often Italian local surnames bore the prefix "di", which signifies emigration from one place to another.... [more]
Cerri Italian
From cerro "oak tree, Turkey oak".
Cerrito Italian
Variant of Cerri, or directly from Sicilian cirritu "Turkey oak grove".
Cervera Spanish
A name for someone coming from any one of many places called Cervera, coming from Late Latin cervaria, meaning "place of stags".
Ceylan Turkish
Turkish surname meaning "gazelle" from Persian carān جران.
Chaiyasing Thai
From Thai ไชย (chai) meaning "victory" and สิงห์ (sing) meaning "lion".
Chandrasinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Chaykov Russian, Belarusian
Derived from Russian чайка (chayka) meaning "seagull".
Cheever English
Means "goatherd", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a goat (e.g. in capriciousness) (in either case from Anglo-Norman chivere "goat"). It was borne by American author John Cheever (1912-1982).
Chemso Adyghe (Russified)
From Adyghe чэмы (čămə) meaning "cow" and шъо (ŝo) meaning "skin, colour".
Chetcuti Maltese
Derived from Arabic كتكوت‎‎ (katkūt) meaning "(newborn) chick, young chicken".
Chevrier French
Occupational name for a goatherd from an agent derivative of chèvre "goat" (from Latin capra "nanny goat").
Chilver English (British)
Means "ewe lamb" , (a young female sheep).
Chono Japanese
Cho can mean "butterfly" and no means "field, wilderness, plain".
Chukho Circassian (Russified)
Derived from Adyghe цу (c°) meaning "ox, bull, buffalo" and шъхьэ (ŝḥă) meaning "head".
Ciavarella Italian
From Sicilian ciavaredda "goat kid", an occupational name for a goatherd, or perhaps a nickname based on the bearer's appearance or behaviour.
Cirrincione Italian
From Sicilian cirrinciò meaning "greenfinch, great tit".
Cīrulis Latvian
Means "lark".
Ciuraru Romanian
Derived from the Romanian word cioară meaning "crow".
Clague Manx
Shortened Anglicization of either Gaelic Mac Luathóg "son of Luathóg", itself derived from a diminutive of Gaelic luath, Manx leah "swift", or from Gaelic Mac Laoghóg "son of Laoghóg", which is derived from a diminutive of Gaelic laogh and Manx lheiy "calf".
Coccimiglio Italian
From Sicilian cuccumeli, the name of several fruit-bearing deciduous trees or of the hackberry plant, itself borrowed from an Ancient Greek word; possibly κοκκύμηλον (kokkymelon) "plum", literally "cuckoo apple", or from κόκκος (kókkos) "grain, seed, kernel" and‎ μῆλον (mêlon) "apple, any fruit from a tree".
Cocco Italian
Possibly from Italian cocco, meaning "darling, favourite" or "hen's egg".
Cochet French
Either from cochet a diminutive of coq "rooster" used as a nickname for a vain conceited or womanizing individual. Or possibly also a habitational name from (Le) Cochet the name of several places in various parts of France.
Codino Italian
Means "pigtail, plait" in Italian, literally "tail's end". Ultimately from Latin cauda "tail (of an animal)". Perhaps given to someone who often wore their hair in such a style, possibly given to orphans or foundlings.
Cogotti Italian
From Sardinian cogotto "cockerel, rooster".
Cois Italian
Possibly from the name of a lost town, Coni. Alternately, may be from dialectical words meaning "to cook" or "finch", referring to an occupation or nickname.
Coley English
With variant Colley can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas.
Colley English
With variant Coley, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
Colomb French
from Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columbus) applied as a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of pigeons or doves... [more]
Conant Old Celtic, Pictish
A patronym from the ancient Celtic personal name Conan, which derives from the Celtic kunovals meaning "high" and "mighty".... [more]
Condori Indigenous American, Aymara (Hispanicized), Quechua (Hispanicized)
Derived from Aymara and Quechua kunturi meaning "condor, vulture".
Coney English
Means "seller of rabbits", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rabbit (in either case from Middle English cony "rabbit").
Coniglio Italian
From coniglio "rabbit" (from Latin cuniculus ) applied as a nickname for a timid person or a metonymic occupational name for a dealer in rabbits. Italian cognitive of Coelho.
Coogan Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
Coot English
“an early member was a person who seemed to exhibit some of the characteristics of birds.”
Corbeanu Romanian
Derived from Romanian corb, itself originally from the Latin corvus meaning "raven" (bird).
Corbin English, French
Derived from French corbeau meaning "raven," originally denoting a person who had dark hair.
Cordeiro Portuguese, Galician
Means "young lamb" in Portuguese and Galician (Latin cordarius, a derivative of cordus "young", "new")... [more]
Cordero Spanish
Means "lamb" in Spanish, either used as an occupational name for a shepherd or a religious name referring to Jesus as the Lamb of God.
Cordisco Italian
Possibly from Italian cordesco "second-born lamb, butchered calf".
Cornacchia Italian
Nickname meaning "crow, jackdaw" in Italian, applied to someone who was talkative or thought to resemble a crow or jackdaw in some other way.
Corrales Spanish
Habitational name for someone originally from any of the various locations named Corrales in Spain, from Spanish corral meaning "coral, enclosure".
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Costello Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oisdealbhaigh meaning "son of Oisdealbhach". The given name Oisdealbhach is derived from Irish os meaning "deer, fawn" and dealbhach meaning "resembling, shapely".
Cota Galician
From Galician meaning "animal den".
Coulon French
From Old French colomb "pigeon" (from Latin columba) used as a metonymic occupational name for a breeder.
Cowburn English
The place-name, in turn, comes from the Old English cocc, meaning "rooster," and burna, meaning "a stream." As such, the surname is classed as a local, or habitational name, derived from a place where the original bearer lived or held land.
Cranston Scottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
Craparotta Italian
From Sicilian crapa "she-goat" and rotta "broken".
Crobu Italian
From Sardinian crobu "crow", or a place of the same name.
Crownover German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of German Kronauer, denoting someone from Kronau, a town near Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It could also be an Americanised form of Kronhöfer (a variant of Grünhofer), a habitational name for someone from a lost place called Grünhof, derived from Middle High German gruene meaning "green" or kranech meaning "crane" and hof meaning "farmstead".
Cuautli Aztec, Nahuatl
From Nahuatl quauhtli meaning "eagle".
Cuervo Spanish
Means "raven, crow" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin corvus. From a nickname for a man with strikingly glossy black hair or with a raucous voice. Alternatively, a habitational name from places containing this word (e.g. El Cuervo, Teruel).
Ćuk Serbian, Croatian
Derived from ćuk (ћук), meaning "scops owl".
Culver English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
Cunniff Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
Daiber German
Derived from either Middle High German tiuber "pigeon breeder, pigeon fancier" or from Middle High German touber "wind musician, musician who plays a wind instrument".
Darázs Hungarian
Means "wasp".
Darley English
Means "person from Darley", Derbyshire ("glade frequented by deer").
Datumanong Filipino, Maranao
From Datomanong, the name of a character in the Maranao epic Darangen. The name itself means "two-headed lizard" in Maranao.
Dearden English
Meant "person from Dearden", Lancashire ("valley frequented by wild animals"). It was borne by British film director Basil Dearden (original name Basil Dear; 1911-1971).
De Beer Afrikaans
De Beer is a Dutch and Afrikaans surname, meaning "the bear"
De Caters Dutch
Nickname for someone thought to resemble a tom cat, derived from Middle Dutch cater, kater literally meaning "tom cat".
Defilippo Italian
The Italian surname De Filippo is a patronymic name created from the first name of a male ancestor. As a first name, it is derived from the Latin "Philippus,". This name is composed of the element "philos" which means "friend," and "hippos," meaning "horse.
De Leeuw Van Weenen Dutch
Means "Lion of Vienna" in Dutch.
Delfin Spanish
Meaning "dolphin" in Spanish.
Delfino Italian, Spanish
From the personal name Delfino, from Latin Delphinus, from delphis "dolphin", regarded in medieval times as a symbol of goodness and friendliness.
Demiri Albanian
It means "young bull".
Demuro Italian
Probably denoting someone from Muro, Basilicata. Alternately, may be a nickname from Sardinian muru "wall" or "donkey".
Den Uijl Dutch
Means "the owl" in Dutch, from Middle Dutch ule. A notable bearer was the Dutch prime minister Johannes den Uijl (1919-1987), also known as Joop den Uyl.
Deveci Turkish
Means "cameleer, camel herder" in Turkish.
Dewasinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit देव (deva) meaning "god" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Dheerasinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit धीर (dhira) meaning "steady, firm, courageous" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Diab Arabic
Derived from Arabic ذِئْب (ḏiʾb) meaning "wolf".
Diop Western African, Wolof
From Joob, the name of a Wolof clan, derived from a totemic word meaning "black craned swan" or "peacock".
Dodge English
Possibly a nickname from Middle English dogge "dog" (Old English docga, dogga).
Doğan Turkish
Means "hawk, falcon" in Turkish.
Douwes Dutch, Frisian
From the given name Douwe, itself derived from Frisian dou meaning "dove, pigeon". A notable bearer was the Dutch writer Eduard Douwes Dekker (1820-1887), better known by his pen name Multatuli.
Drach Jewish
Ornamental surname derived from German Drache "dragon" (ultimately from Middle High German trache).
Dracula Romanian
The Wallachian name for dragon was "Drac" or "Dracul". Vlad II of Wallachia joined a semi-secret order known as The Order of the Dragon and took the name Vlad Dracul. The word "Drac" can also mean "devil" or "evil spirit"... [more]
Dragon French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
Dragonetti Italian
Diminutive of drago or dragone "dragon".
Drakos Greek
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which means "dragon, serpent"
Dreik French
Derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".
Drown English
Derived from drone meaning "honey bee"
Duck English, Irish
English from Middle English doke "duck", hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck, or an occupational name for someone who kept or hunted ducks. Alternatively, a variant form of Duke... [more]
Duckworth English
Habitational name from Duckworth Fold, in the borough of Bury, Lancashire, which is named from Old English fuce "duck" and wor{dh} "enclosure".
Dudayev Chechen, Ossetian (Russified)
Russified form of a Chechen and Ossetian family name of disputed meaning; the name may be derived from Ossetian дудахъхъ (dudaqq) meaning "bustard", from Ingush тат (tat) meaning "Mountain Jew", or from Circassian дадэ (dade) meaning "grandfather" or "king, head, chief"... [more]
Dufva Swedish
From Swedish duva "dove, pigeon".
Dworkin Jewish
From a pet-form of the Yiddish female personal name Dvoyre, from Hebrew Devorah (source of English Deborah), literally "bee"... [more]
Dyatlov Russian
From Russian дятел (dyatel) meaning "woodpecker".
Džambas Romani
Meaning "herdsman, horse trader", from Persian ganbas, which translates as "herdsman". In the Turkish language, this term has the same meaning as... [more]
Dzugaev Ossetian (Russified)
Probably derived from Dzuga, the name of a past ancestor and the founder of the family/clan of uncertain meaning, though it could have been used to refer to a shepherd or herder if derived from Iron Ossetian дзуг (dzug) meaning "flock, herd (of sheep or cattle)".
Eagle English
Nickname for a lordly, impressive, or sharp-eyed man, from Middle English egle "eagle" (from Old French aigle, from Latin aquila).
Earnshaw English
Means "person from Earnshaw", Lancashire ("Earn's nook of land" - Earn from an Old English personal name meaning literally "eagle"). In fiction this surname is borne by Catherine Earnshaw, her brother Hindley and her nephew Hareton, characters in Emily Brontë's 'Wuthering Heights' (1847).
Edirisinghe Sinhalese
Derived from Sinhalese ඉදිරි (idiri) meaning "front, forward" and Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Eelmaa Estonian
Eelmaa is an Estonian surname derived from "eel" maening "fore" aand "maa" meaning "land".
Einhorn German, Jewish
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
Eizuru Japanese
From 栄 (ei) meaning "prosper, flourish, glory, splendid, brilliance" and 鶴 (tsuru) meaning "crane (bird), white color, long life".
Elkington English
According to Wikipedia Elkington is a deserted medieval village and civil parish in the West Northamptonshire in England. The villages name means "Elta's hill" or perhaps, less likely, "swan hill".... [more]
Ennals English
This unusual and interesting surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from either of two Anglo-Scandinavian male given names: Ingald or Ingulf. The former derives ultimately from the Old Norse "Ingialdr", having as its initial element the divine name "Ing", borne by a minor Norse god associated with fertility, and meaning "swelling, protuberance", with "gialdr", tribute; hence, "Ing's tribute"... [more]
Erenhart English (Rare), German, Dutch
“Eren” is derived from the word “Ehren,” which is of German origin and means “honor” or “glory.” ... [more]
Erm Estonian
Erm is an Estonian surname possibly derived from the masculine given name "Ermel", or "hermeliin" meaning "ermine" and "stoat".
Erwin English, German, Irish, Scottish
From the given name Erwin. From the Middle English personal name Everwin Erwin perhaps from Old English Eoforwine (eofor "boar" and wine "friend") but mostly from an Old French form of the cognate ancient Germanic name Everwin or from a different ancient Germanic name Herewin with loss of initial H- (first element hari heri "army")... [more]
Escuintla Nahuatl
From Nahuatl Itzcuintlan meaning "abundance or place of dogs".
Espa Italian
From Sardinian espa "wasp", making this a cognate of Vespa.
Eul German
A nickname from Middle High German iule meaning "owl".
Everingham English
Means "homestead of the followers of Eofor". From Old English eofor "boar" inga, meaning "the people of, followers of" and ham meaning "home, estate, settlement".
Eyre English
Truelove the "Eyr" or "Heyr" was granted land in Derby as a reward for his services at the 1066 Battle of Hastings, together with a coat of arms featuring "a human leg in armour couped at the thigh quarterly argent and sable spurred", in reference to the sacrifice of his limb... [more]
Falcão Portuguese
Portuguese surname meaning "falcon".
Falcón Spanish, South American
Originally a nickname from falcón, an archaic variant of Spanish halcón "falcon" (from Latin falco). It is a cognate of Falco.
Falcon Jewish
Possibly derived from the German Falke, meaning "falcon."
Falkenberg German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falk "falcon" and berg "mountain, hill".
Falkenhagen German
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falke meaning "falcon" + hag meaning "hedge", "fencing". A place so named is documented west of Berlin in the 14th century.
Faraguna Croatian, Italian
Derived from Istro-Romanian fară gună, meaning "without a shepherd's goat-skin cloak".
Farand English (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
Farrugia Maltese
Derived from Maltese farruġ meaning "chicken, cockerel", ultimately from Arabic فُرُوج (furūj). It was used as a nickname for someone who fed chickens.
Fasano Italian
Probably from Italian fasani "pheasant", a nickname for someone who resembled the bird in appearance or (lack of) intelligence, who hunted them, or who lived in an area populated by them. ... [more]
Fastolf English
From the Old Norse male personal name Fastúlfr, literally "strong wolf". It was borne by Sir John Fastolf (1380-1459), an English soldier whose name was adapted by Shakespeare as "Falstaff".
Faucett English
Locational surname from various British places: Fawcett in Cumberland, Facit in Lancashire, Forcett in North Yorkshire, or Fa’side Castle in East Lothian, Scotland. The linguistic origins of the name arise variously from, in Cumberland and Lancashire, "multi-coloured hillside" in 7th century Old English fag or fah, "brightly coloured, variegated, flowery" with side, "slope"; in North Yorkshire from Old English ford, "ford", and sete, "house, settlement"; or, reputedly, in East Lothian, "fox on a hillside"... [more]
Fawkes English
From the Norman personal name Faulques or Fauques, which was derived from a Germanic nickname meaning literally "falcon". A famous bearer of the surname was Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), the English Catholic conspirator... [more]
Fawley English
This is a name for someone who worked as a person who worked as the fowler or the bird-catcher having derived from the Old English word "fugelere" which literally means "hunter of wild birds, fowler"... [more]
Federspiel German (Swiss)
Derived from Middle High German vederspil "bird of prey (trained for hunting)", this was an occupational name for a falconer.
Fenech Maltese
Derived from Maltese fenek meaning "rabbit", ultimately from Arabic فَنَكْ (fanak) meaning "fennec fox".
Ferrand French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
Ferrando Italian, Spanish
This surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval masculine given name Ferrando, which was in use in both Italy and Spain during the Middle Ages... [more]
Ferrante Italian
This surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval masculine given name Ferrante... [more]