All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Burken English
English variant of Birkin (see Burkins).
Burkett English
English: from an Old English personal name, Burgheard, composed of the elements burh, burg ‘fort’ (see Burke) + heard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’... [more]
Burkhalter German
Topographic name composed of the Middle High German elements burc "castle" "protection" and halter from halde "slope".
Burkhardt German
Burk is German for "Strong", and hardt is the "heart of a castle".
Burkins English
English variant of Birkin, Burkin, a habitational name from the parish of Birkin in West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bircen ‘birch grove’, a derivative of birce (see Birch).
Burkowski Polish
It is composed of buk (Common Slavic for "beech tree") and the Slavic suffixes -ov and -ski. In some cases, the name may originate from a toponym
Burks English
English variant spelling of Birks.
Burl English
Old English occupational name originally meaning "cup bearer" or "butler" for one who dispensed wine and had charge of the cellar. Eventually the name came to mean the chief servant of a royal or noble household and was replaced by the French language inspired named 'Butler,' akin to the world "bottler".
Burley English
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
Burlin Russian
From burla, meaning "storm".
Burlingame English
means "Burling's homestead".
Burlington English
Habitational name from Bridlington in East Yorkshire, from Old English Bretlintun meaning Berhtel's town.
Burmeister German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
Burnell Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
A name for a person with a brown complexion or dark brown hair. From the Old English burnel via the French brunel a diminutive of the French brun, which means "brown". The suffix el-- a short form of "little" was added to brun to make Brunel... [more]
Burnett English
Scottish and English: descriptive nickname from Old French burnete, a diminutive of brun "brown" (see Brown).
Burnette French
Descriptive nickname from Old French burnete ‘brown’ (see Burnett). Possibly also a reduced form of Buronet, from a diminutive of Old French buron ‘hut’, ‘shack’.
Burney English, Irish
Form of the French place name of 'Bernay' or adapted from the personal name Bjorn, ultimately meaning "bear".
Burnley English
English (Lancashire and Yorkshire): habitational name from Burnley in Lancashire, so named with the Old English river name Brun (from brun ‘brown’ or burna ‘stream’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
Burr English, Scottish, German
Nickname for a person who is difficult to shake off, derived from Middle English bur(r) meaning "bur" (a seedhead that sticks to clothing). It could also be a derivation from Old English bur meaning "small dwelling, building", or it is a German topographic name derived from burr(e) meaning "mound, hill".
Burridge English
Derived from an English place name, derived from Old English burg "fortress, fortification, castle" and Old English hrycg, Old Norse hryggr "ridge" or from the name Burgric.
Burris English
Variant of English Burrows or German BÖRRIES.
Burroughs English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, Old English "beorg", a cognate of Old High German berg "hill", ‘mountain’ (see Berg). This name has become confused with derivatives of Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke)... [more]
Burrow English
Used to describe someone who lives in a burrow, which makes this surname’s meaning “he whom lives in a burrow.”
Burrows English
Variant of Burroughs. A name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, also may be a further derivation from Old English bur "bower" and hus "house".
Burruchaga Spanish, Basque
From "Pais Vasco" in Spain.
Bursey French
Variant of Burcy.
Burt English
From the given name, which is a short form of Burton.
Burtram English (American)
American form of the German surname Bertram.
Burtsell English (American)
Habitational name from Burshill in East Yorkshire, so named with Old English bryst ‘landslip’, ‘rough ground’ + hyll ‘hill’.
Buruaga Basque
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous council of the municipality of Zigoitia.
Burwitz Polabian
From Polabian bur (farmer) and the germanized slavic ending -witz.... [more]
Burzinski Polish
Variant spelling of Burzynski.
Burzyński Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of various locations called Burzyn, derived from Polish burza meaning "storm, tempest".
Busbee English
Variant of Busby.
Busby English
Habitational name from a place in North Yorkshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Buschebi, from Old Norse buskr "bush, shrub" or an Old Norse personal name Buski and býr "homestead, village", or from some other place so called.
Buscemi Sicilian
Name for someone originally from the town of Buscemi in Sicily, derived from the Arabic toponym قلعة أبي شامة‎ (qal'at 'abi shama) meaning "castle of the man with the mole‎" or "castle of (the family of) Abi Shama".
Buschbaum German
Means "bush tree" in German.
Buschiazzo Italian
It's a surname in northern Italy (Piedmont). It emerges from the German spelling Bosch or Busch and this means "forest" or "wooded area".
Busfield English
This is a locational surname and originates from the hamlet of 'Bousfield', eight miles from the town of Appleby in Cumberland. This hamlet was controlled by Norse Vikings for several centuries until the Norman invasion of 1066... [more]
Bushe English
Variant of Bush.
Bushida Japanese
Bushi means "Warrior, Samurai" and Da means "Rice Paddy, Field".
Bushman Scottish
longer than Bush.
Busquets Catalan
Catalan form of Bousquet.
Bussard English (Australian)
Variant of Bosshart
Busse German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
Bustamante Spanish
Habitational name for someone originally from the town of Bustamante in Cantabria, Spain, derived from Latin bustum Amantii meaning "pasture of Amantius".
Busujima Japanese
Sacrifice, Innovative, Powerful
Butković Croatian
Habitational name for someone from Butkovići, Croatia.
Butt Urdu, Kashmiri
Urdu and Kashmiri form of Bhatt.
Butta Italian
Italian: from a short form of a compound name formed with butta- ‘throw’, as for example Buttacavoli.Italian: from an old German feminine personal name Butta.Italian: variant of Botta.
Buttacavoli Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + cavoli "cabbages".
Buttafuoco Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + fuoco "fire".
Butte Indian
Variant of Bute.
Butter English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
Butterfield English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere ‘butter’ + feld ‘open country’.
Butterfly English
From the insect Butterfly this Surname is borne by Star Butterfly from Star Vs. the forces of evil.
Butterworth English (British)
From places called Butterworth in England. Derived Old English butere ‘butter’ + worð ‘enclosure’.
Buttery English (British)
The baker in Old English.
Buttgereit German
Variant spelling of Butgereit. A famous bearer is German film director and screenwriter Jörg Buttgereit (1963-).
Buttiġieġ Maltese
From Maltese bu t-tiġieġ literally meaning "father of chickens", referring to a poulterer or someone who owned chickens.
Buttigieg Maltese
Unaccented form of Buttiġieġ.
Büttner German
Occupational name for a cooper or barrel-maker, an agent derivative of Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "wine barrel". This name occurs chiefly in eastern German-speaking regions.
Buttram English (American, Rare), English (British, Rare)
Possibly derived from the German cognate Bertram, from the Germanic elements beraht (meaning "bright"), and hrabn (meaning "raven")... [more]
Buu Vietnamese
A royal Vietnamese surname created by the Nguyen Dynasty.
Bux Anglo-Saxon
From boc, meaning a beach, or beech. Sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Buxton, in Derbyshire, Buxhall, in Suffolk, or Buxted in Sussex; variant of "Buck", a deer.
Bux Urdu, Sindhi
Derived from Persian بخش (bakhsh) meaning "fortune" or "section, portion, part".
Buxbaum German, Jewish
Means "box tree" in German.
Buxton English
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
Buyeo Korean
Archaic surname of the ancient Buyeo Kingdom
Buys Afrikaans (Modern)
South Africa, Pretoria
Buzelli Italian
Chris Buzelli is an illustrator.
Bwire Spanish (Caribbean)
A name that originated from the Dominican Republic then mostly used in Eastern Africa.
Bwye Welsh (Rare)
many of this name moved from south wales to india to work for the east india company around 1900's then came back to wales.
Byam English
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
Byanski Polish
looking for the meaning of this name as it is my maiden name.
Byberg Norwegian, Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish and Norwegian by "village" and berg "mountain".
Bychan Welsh
Proper, unanglicized form of Vaughan.
Bycraft English (American, Rare, ?)
Found mostly in the American Great Lakes region and Canada, likely a singular extended family. Likely of 6th century English descent, though there are very few English natives who bear the name. Name either refers to the occupation running some sort of mill machine, the original holder living near a croft (enclosed pasture or tillage) or implies "craftiness" of its original holder.
Bydłowski Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Bydłowa.
Byeon Korean (Modern)
Variant romanization of Sino-Korean 邉 (Byun) meaning "Border".
Byer Scottish, English (British), American, Canadian
The history of the Byer family begins in the Boernician tribes of ancient Scotland. The Byer family lived in or near the place named Byers in Scotland. The place-name, Byers, derives from the Old English word byre, which means cattle shed... [more]
Byers Scottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
Byers German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
Byfield English
Either a habitational name from a place named Byfield, or a topographic name for someone who lived near a field.
Bykov Russian
From byk, meaning "bull".
Bykowski Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Bykowice or Byków.
Bylilly Navajo
Derived from Navajo ‎"for him" and álílee "magic power".
Bylin Swedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and the suffix -in, derived from Latin -inus, -inius "descendant of"
Bylund Swedish
Combination of Swedish by "village" and lund "grove".
Bynes Irish
This is the surname of American actress Amanda Bynes (born April 3, 1986).
Byre English
Probably derived from Old English bȳre "farm, barn".
Byres Scottish
Byres was first used as a surname by the descendants of the ancient Boernician clans of Scotland. The first Byres family lived in or near the place named Byers in Scotland. The place-name, Byers, derives from the Old English word byre, which means cattle shed... [more]
Byron English
An English place name, earlier Byram, from byre, meaning "farm" and the suffix -ham meaning "homestead". Famously borne by the aristocratic poet, Lord Byron.
Byrum English
Variant of Byron.
Bystedt Swedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and German stedt "home, place".
Bythesea English (British)
Habitational name for someone who lived near the sea, this name is nearly extinct in England today.
Bythewood English (British)
A nearly extinct habitational surname for one who lived near, by or around a wooded (forested) area.
Byun Korean
From Sino-Korean (Byun) meaning "Border".
Bywater English
The surname Bywater came from the Anglo-Saxon origin and means ’dweller by the water‘
Bzovsky Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian and Russian form of Bzowski.
Bzowski Polish
Habitational name for someone who comes from the town of Bzowo in Poland.
Caamaño Galician
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish in the municipality of Porto do Son.
Caasi Filipino, Ilocano
Means "pitiful" in Ilocano.
Cab Spanish
Diminutive of Cabello, Cabrera, or Cabral.
Caba Spanish, Catalan
Variant of Cava.
Cababa Spanish
Spanish (Cabaña) and Portuguese: habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña ‘hut’, ‘cabin’ (Late Latin capanna , a word of Celtic or Germanic origin).
Cabahug Filipino, Cebuano
Means "feeder" from Cebuano bahog meaning "feed, slop".
Cabaleiro Galician
'Knight' derived from an occupation, Galician origins.
Caballo Spanish, Spanish (Latin American)
Derived from the Spanish word cabello, ultimately derived from the Latin word caballus, meaning "horse". This denoted someone who worked in a farm that took care of horses, or someone who had personality traits attributed to a horse, such as energetic behaviour.
Cabaña Spanish, Portuguese
Habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña ‘hut’, ‘cabin’ (Late Latin capanna, a word of Celtic or Germanic origin).
Cabañas Spanish, Portuguese
Habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña or Portuguese cabanha ‘hut’, ‘cabin’.
Cabaniss French
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'... [more]
Čabarkapa Serbian, Montenegrin
Derived from čabar (чабар), meaning "tub, bucket", and kapa (капа), meaning "cap, hat".
Cabatuan Filipino, Cebuano
Derived from Cebuano kabatoan meaning "rocky area, rocky place".
Cabell Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
Cable English
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
Cabucos English
Decended from Old English meaning "leader."
Cabugatan Filipino, Maranao
From Maranao kabugatan, a historical title for a crown prince.
Caccavale Italian
Possibly a combination of cacare "to shit" and vale "valley".
Cacciatore Italian
Derived from Italian cacciatore meaning "hunter, huntsman", ultimately derived from cacciare meaning "to hunt".
Cacioppo Italian, Sicilian
Derived from Sicilian cacioppu meaning "dried tree trunk", presumably applied as a nickname for someone with wizened skin, or from caciopu meaning "short-sighted" (derived from Greek kakiopes, literally meaning "having bad eyes").
Cadan Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Cadain.
Cadbury English
Derived from Norman French
Caddick Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadog, a pet-form of Cadfael (a derivative of Welsh cad "battle").
Cadena Spanish
From Aguilar de Campoo, a district of Villalon in Valladolid.
Caderousse French, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
Cadillac French
From the name of a city in France, of origin I am not sure of (anyone who knows the name's etymology edit this). This is most notably the name of the car company of the same name, named after Detroit, Michigan founder Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de Cadillac.
Cadiñanos Castilian
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous minor local entity.
Cadlawon Visayan
Literally "dawn" in Cebuano.
Cadogan Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadwgan, literally probably "battle-scowler". Cadogan Estate is an area of Chelsea and Belgravia, including Cadogan Square, Sloane Street and Sloane Square, owned by the earls of Cadogan, descended from Charles Sloane Cadogan (1728-1807), 1st Earl Cadogan.
Cadoret French, Breton
From an old Breton given name Catuuoret meaning "protector in combat".
Caesar Ancient Roman, English
An Ancient Roman political title that indicated a military leader. A famous bearer was Julius Caesar, Roman general, dictator, and politician. In modern times, the surname is used to refer to an individual with a tyrannical attitude, which references the connotative meaning of the word "caesar", meaning "a dictator".
Caetano Portuguese
From the given name Caetano.
Cagadas Filipino
The name Cagadas is most likely made or given to the Filipinos during the baptism of native Filipinos to Christianity in the 19th Century during the expedition of Ferdinand Magellan. Most Filipinos had no surnames prior to their baptism and these names are given by the Spanish colonizers.
Cagney Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Caingnigh meaning "descendant of Caingneach", a given name meaning "pleader, advocate". A famous bearer was American actor and dancer James Cagney (1899-1986).
Cahayag Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano kahayag meaning "light, splendour".
Cahill Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of Cathal’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
Cai Chinese
From Chinese 蔡 (cài) referring to the ancient state of Cai that existed during the Zhou dynasty in what is now Henan province.
Caillou French
Means "pebble" in French. Perhaps a nickname for a bald person.
Cain English
From the given name Cain
Caine French, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someone with a bad temper.
Caird Scottish
Derived from Scottish Gaelic ceard meaning "craftsman, artist mechanic, travelling tinker".
Cairns Scottish
From Gaelic carn "cairn", a topographic name for someone who lived by a cairn, i.e. a pile of stones raised as a boundary marker or a memorial.
Cairo Italian
One who came from Cairo.
Caixeta Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese common name for Tabebuia cassinoides, a tree native to Central and South America.
Cajigas Spanish, Filipino
Topographic name from the plural of Spanish cajigo, derived from quejigo meaning "gall oak".
Cake English
From the Middle English cake denoting a flat loaf made from fine flour (Old Norse kaka), hence a metonymic occupational name for a baker who specialized in fancy breads. It was first attested as a surname in the 13th century (Norfolk, Northamptonshire).
Çakır Turkish
Means "greyish blue (eyes)" in Turkish.
Čaklais Latvian
Means "the diligent one".
Çakmak Turkish
Means "lighter" in Turkish, referring to a tool used to ignite fire. This is also the name of a village in Antalya Province, Turkey.
Čakste Latvian
Means "shrike".
Cal English
Possibly from the given name Cal.
Calatayud Spanish
From the city in Spain, in province of Zaragoza within the autonomous community Aragón. The name Calatayud came from the Arabic قلعة أيوب Qal‘at ’Ayyūb, "the qalat (fortress) of Ayyub".
Calaway English
Variant spelling of Callaway.
Calcaterra Italian
Nickname from calcare meaning "to tread", "to stamp" + terra meaning "land", "earth", "ground", probably denoting a short person, someone who walked close to the ground, or an energetic walker.
Caldeira Portuguese
Name given to a maker of kettles or other cooking vessels.
Caldeirao Portuguese
From Portuguese meaning "cauldron".
Caldera Spanish
Derived from Spanish caldera meaning "basin, crater, hollow", ultimately from Latin caldarium or caldaria both meaning "hot bath, cooking pot". The word also denotes a depression in volcanoes, and it is commonly used as an element for surnames denoting streams or mountains.
Calderón Spanish
Occupational name for a tinker or a seller or maker of kettles from Vulgar Latin *caldaria meaning "cauldron". Alternately, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of various locations named Calderón or a topographic name from Spanish caldera meaning "crater, basin".
Calderone Italian
From the Latin word Caldaria "cauldron". Given to someone who worked as a tinker or tinsmith.
Calderwood English
From the lordship of Calderwood in Lanarkshire, Scotland
Cale Welsh
Possibly derived from the River Cale. A famous barer of this name is Welsh musician John Cale (1942- ).
Caleb American
Caleb norwood
Calero Spanish
Metonymic occupational name for a burner or seller of lime, from calero ‘lime’.
Calfee Anglo-Saxon
This surname is a variant of the name Calf, which is a variant of the Old Norse Kalfr, however it is possible that it is a nickname for someone who had characteristics like a calf, or baby cow.
Caligiuri Italian
Comes from the Greek words "kalos" meaning "beautiful" and "gheros" meaning "elderly," and was often given to children in the hopes that they would retain their beauty in their old age.
Calimeris Greek
It can be Kalimeris as well and it means good morning.
Călin Romanian
From the given name Călin.
Calinao Filipino, Cebuano, Hiligaynon
Derived from Cebuano and Hiligaynon kalinaw meaning "calmness, peace, tranquility".
Calinawan Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano kalinawan meaning "peace".
Calingasan Filipino, Tagalog
From Tagalog kalingasan meaning "lustre of a surface (which reflects light)".
Çalışkan Turkish
Means "hard-working, diligent, assiduous" in Turkish.
Calisto Portuguese, Spanish
From the given name Calisto.
Cālītis Latvian
Derived from the word cālis meaning "chick".
Calixte French
From the given name Calixte