All Submitted Surnames

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Bjeljac Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian
From the Croation Area of Kordun specifically Koranski Lug. Possibly also Bosnia. A large migration of Serbs were enticed by the Austrian government to move from Bosnia to Croatia to act as a buffer militia between the Ottoman Empire of Bosnia and the Austro-Hungarian Empire in Croatia... [more]
Bjelovuk Serbian
From the given name Vuk. Variant of Belovuk.
Bjorgman Popular Culture
The surname of Kristoff from the movie "Frozen".
Bjørk Norwegian, Danish, Faroese
Norwegian, Danish and Faroese form of Björk.
Bjørklund Norwegian
From any of several farms named with Norwegian bjørk "birch" and lund "grove".
Bjorklund English (American)
Anglicized form of Swedish Björklund or Norwegian Bjørklund.
Björkqvist Swedish
Combination of Swedish björk "birch tree" and qvist, an obsolete spelling of kvist, "twig".
Björn Swedish
Means "bear" in Swedish. Either taken directly from the given name (see Björn) or from a nickname for a big, hairy person. It may also be derived from a place named with the element björn.
Björnberg Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish björn meaning "bear" and berg meaning "mountain".
Björnsdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Björn". Its masculine counterpart is Björnsson.
Blach Polish
Alternatively perhaps a metonymic occupational name from Old Polish blach ‘skeet iron’, ‘metal fittings’.
Blacher French
Mainly used in Southern France. Topographic name for someone who lived by an oak grove, originating in the southeastern French dialect word blache ‘oak plantation’ (said to be of Gaulish origin), originally a plantation of young trees of any kind.
Blachowski Polish
Related to forming or rolling thin sheets of metal, perhaps gilding.
Blackberry English
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
Blacke English
Variant of Black.
Blackerby English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
Blackford English
Derived from the words blæc "black" or blac "pale, shining, white" and ford "river crossing"
Blackley English
The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon Blæcleah which meant "dark wood" or "dark clearing".
Blackmore English
BLACKMORE, an English name, has two possible beginnings: ... [more]
Blacks English
Variant of Black.
Blacksmith English
Occupational name for a blacksmith, a smith who work with iron. The name is rare in England and mostly found in North America, suggesting that it's a translation of a non-English name meaning "blacksmith" (see Kowalski, Raudsepp and Lefèvre for example).
Blackstock English
English and southern Scottish: topographic name from Middle English blak(e) ‘black’, ‘dark’ + stok ‘stump’, ‘stock’.
Blackwell English
From an English place name derived from Old English blæc meaning "black" and wille meaning "well, spring, water hole".
Blade English
Metonymic occupational name for a cutler, from Middle English blade "cutting edge, sword".
Blaga Romanian
Probably related to several places named Blaga in Romania.
Blagden Anglo-Saxon
Blagden is a locational surname deriving from any one of the places called Blackden or Blagdon, or Blagden farm in Hempstead, Essex. Blackden in Cheshire, Blagden in Essex and Blagdon in Northumberland share the same meaning and derivation, which is "the dark or black valley", derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "blaec", black, with "denu", valley, while the places called Blagdon in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, recorded as Blakedone in 1242, Blakeson in 1234, and Blachedone in the Domesday Book of 1086 respectively mean "the black hill", derived from the Old English "blaec", black, and "dun", down, hill, mountain... [more]
Blagojević Serbian
Patronymic, meaning "son of Blagoje".
Blagojevich Serbian (Americanized, Modern)
Americanized form of Serbian patronymic Blagojević.
Blagoveshchensky Russian
Named after the City of Blagoveshchensk
Blaiklock Scottish (Anglicized, Modern, Rare)
Allegerdly from Blacklock which supposedly described the colour of someone's hair.
Blain Scottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Bláán, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of Blin... [more]
Blaine Scottish
Derived from the given name Bláán.
Blaire Scottish, English
Variant spelling of Blair.
Blakelock English
A nickname derived from blæc "black" and locc "lock of hair".
Blakesmith German (Anglicized)
Derived from the German, Blechschmidt, it means "tin smith", and/or, blacksmith.
Blakestone English (British)
The surname Blakeston was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Blaxton, a township in the parish of Finningley, union and soke of Doncaster.... [more]
Blakeway English
Literally means "black way", thus referring to a black road near which the original bearer must have lived. A famous bearer of this surname was Jacob Blakeway (b. 1583-?), the biological father of Mayflower passenger Richard More (1614-1696).
Blakewood Medieval English
Derived from the Old English words blaec, which means black, and wudu, which means wood, and indicates that the original bearer lived near a dark, wooded area.
Blamey English
From blaidh-mez, the wolf's meadow; or pleu-mez, the parish meadow.
Blancaflor Spanish (Philippines)
Means "white flower," from the Spanish words blanca meaning "white" and flor meaning "flower."
Blancanieves Spanish (Rare)
Means "Snow White" in Spanish.
Blancarte Spanish
Likely a variant of Blanchard.
Blanchflower English
From a medieval nickname applied probably to an effeminate man (from Old French blanche flour "white flower"). This surname was borne by Northern Irish footballer Danny Blanchflower (1926-1993).
Bland English
Bland is a habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire called Bland, the origin of which is uncertain. Possibly it is from Old English (ge)bland ‘storm’, ‘commotion’ (from blandan ‘to blend or mingle’), with reference to its exposed situation... [more]
Blandford English
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
Blaney Irish
Topographic name from Welsh blaenau, plural of blaen "point, tip, end", i.e. uplands, or remote region, or upper reaches of a river.
Blank Dutch
Dutch and German nickname for a man with white or fair hair or a pale complexion, from Middle Low, Middle High German blanc "bright", "shining", "white", "beautiful", Middle Dutch blank "fair", "white".... [more]
Blankenbiller Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Blankenbijl or similar.
Blankenship English
Variant of Blenkinsop, a surname derived from a place in Northumberland called Blenkinsopp. The place name possibly derives from Cumbric blaen "top" and kein "back, ridge", i.e. "top of the ridge", combined with Old English hōp "valley" (compare Hope).
Blankenstein German, Jewish
From German blanken meaning "bare" and stein meaning "stone".
Blanton Scottish (Americanized, Modern)
An americanized version of the old Scottish name Ballantine (other forms being Ballantyne, Bannatyne, Ballanden).
Blaque Spanish, Catalan
Variant of "Llaquet". It could also be a Catalan variant of Black
Blas Spanish
From the given name Blas.
Blase German
Derivative of Blasius.
Blasey French
The name may have been associated with a 4th century (316) French saint Blasius of Armenie (Armienes,) and later introduced into and adopted by Yorkshire people as their saint of wool-combers from a Norman noble.
Bläsi Romansh
Derived from the given name Blasius.
Blasio Italian
Italian form of Blaise.
Blasioli Italian
Ancient and illustrious Benevento family, called Blasi or Di Blasi, of clear and avita nobility.
Blasius German, Dutch, Scandinavian
From the Latin personal name Blasius. This was a Roman family name, originating as a byname for someone with some defect, either of speech or gait, from Latin blaesus "stammering" (compare Greek blaisos "bow-legged")... [more]
Blaškić Croatian
Patronymic, meaning "son of Blaž".
Blasquez Spanish
From the medieval diminutive Velasco, from the Basque word 'bela' meaning "crow", and the diminutive suffix 'sko'.
Blatt German, Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German blatt and Yiddish blat meaning "leaf", or a topographic name for someone who lived at a farm on a ledge on a mountainside, derived from Middle High German blate meaning "flat surface, ledge, plateau".
Blaum German
German last name, likely a variant of the last name Blom or Blum, referring to the word flower/blooming.
Blaustein German, Jewish
Ornamental name from German blau "blue" and Stein "stone", i.e. lapis lazuli.
Blaxton English
There are two possible origins for this surname; one- from the name of the village in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England) on the border of Lincolnshire, or two- from the Old English personal name Blaecstan, meaning "black stone"
Blay French
From Old French bloi 'blond', or a habitational name from a placename, perhaps by metanalysis from Blois in Loir-et-Cher, France. Usually someone with the lastname 'Blay' is a gentle or merry person.
Blaylock English
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
Blaze English
Variant of Blaise.
Błażejewski Polish
Name for someone from a place called Błażejewo, Błażejewice, Błażejewko or Błażej, all derived from the given name Błażej.
Blazer Dutch
from Middle Dutch blaser ‘blower’, hence an occupational name for a player of the trumpet or other wind instrument, or a nickname for a braggart or boaster
Blazkowicz Polish
From the video game series, Wolfenstein, Blazkowicz is the main character.
Bleau French
Roughly translated into " blue water".
Bledig Welsh
"like a wolf"
Bledsoe English
Comes from a place in Gloucestershire called Bledisloe, comes from an Old English personal name Blið.
Bleecker Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, a launderer, or the owner of a public bleaching ground.
Bleeker Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, from Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
Bleibaum German
"Lead tree" possibly changed at Ellis Island from Blumenbaum meaning "flowering tree"
Bleiberg Dutch
Habitational name from a place so named in Luxembourg province, Belgium.
Blemker Dutch
Dutch: occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
Blennerhassett English
The Blennerhassett surname comes from someone having lived in Cumberland, on the Borderlands between Scotland and England. ... [more]
Błeński Polish
This indicates familial origin anywhere within a cluster of 3 Kuyavian villages in Gmina Izbica Kujawska: Błenna, Błenna A, or Błenna B.
Blesse English (British), Filipino, Indian, French
The last name Blesse was first discovered in Oxfordshire and held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. In the Philippines, Blesse means "a blessing in the family." In India, Blesse means "bless you."
Blessed English
From a medieval nickname for a fortunate person. This surname is borne by British actor Brian Blessed (1936-).
Blessing German, English
Either a German patronymic from a variant of the personal name Blasius or a nickname for a bald person from Middle High German blas "bald bare"... [more]
Bleu French
"Blue."
Bleuzen Breton
Derived from the feminine given name Bleuzenn.
Blevens Welsh
Alternate spelling of Blevins.
Blewett English
From a medieval nickname for a blue-eyed person or one who habitually wore blue clothing (from Middle English bleuet "cornflower" or bluet "blue cloth").
Bligh English
Variant of Blythe.
Blight English
comes from blithe
Blin Welsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
Blinov Russian
Russian surname, derived from the word "блин" (pancake).
Blinova Russian
Feminine form of Blinov.
Bliss Medieval English, Medieval English (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the Old English blisse, meaning "gladness" or "joy." Another origin of the surname is habitional, coming from from the village of Blay in Calvados (modern-day Normandy), spelled as Bleis in 1077, or from the village of Stoke Bliss in Worcestershire, first known as Stoke de Blez, named after the Norman family de Blez.... [more]
Blissett English
A different form of Blessed. A bearer of this surname is Luther Blissett (1958-), a Jamaican-born English footballer ("Luther Blissett" has been used since 1994 as a cover name for activists engaging in anti-cultural establishment polemics and spoofs on the internet and elsewhere).
Blitstein German, Jewish
Stein is the German word for stone.
Blitz German
This surname is presumed to be coming from a nickname for a fast runner or a quick tempered person, from German blitz(er) meaning "lightning" (ultimately from Middle High German blicze.)
Blitzer German, Jewish
Variant of Blitz. from German blitzer "lightning" (Middle High German blicze) presumably a nickname for a fast mover.
Blitzstein German, Jewish
Blitz is the German word for lightening and stein is the German word for stone.
Blixt Swedish
From Swedish blixt "lightning, flash".
Blizanac Serbian
From Serbian meaning 'twin'.
Bliźniak Polish
Derived from Polish bliźniak "twin".
Blizzard English
A different form (influenced by blizzard "heavy snowstorm") of Blissett.
Bloch Jewish, German, French
Regional name for someone in Central Europe originating from Italy or France, from Polish "Włoch" meaning "Italian" (originally "stranger / of foreign stock"), ultimately derived – like many names and words in various European languages – from the Germanic Walhaz.
Block Jewish
Variant of Bloch.
Blöcker German
Occupational name for a jailer.
Bloem Dutch
Means "flower" in Dutch.
Bloemendaal Dutch
Dutch cognate of the German surname Blumenthal.
Blogg English
The name is most likely Anglo-Saxon or early medieval English in origin. ... [more]
Blokhin Russian
Russian surname
Blomkvist Swedish
Variant of Blomqvist. Mikael Blomkvist is a fictional character in Stieg Larsson's Millennium Series.
Blomstrand Swedish
From Swedish blomma (Old Norse blóm) meaning "flower" and strand (Old Norse strǫnd) meaning "beach, sea shore".
Blond French
Nickname from old French blund blond "fair-haired" a word of ancient Germanic origin.
Blondeau French
Diminutive of Blond.
Blondel French
From old French blondel a diminutive of blond "blond, fair" variant of Blond.
Blonder Dutch
Occupational name for a brewer.
Blondin French
Diminutive of Blond, nickname for someone with fair hair.
Błoński Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of various places named Błonie, derived from Polish błonie meaning "pasture, meadow".
Blood English
Evidently from Old English blod ‘blood’, but with what significance is not clear. In Middle English the word was in use as a metonymic occupational term for a physician, i.e. one who lets blood, and also as an affectionate term of address for a blood relative.
Blood Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh ap Llwyd ‘son of Llwyd’.
Blood English
Derived from the Old English byname Blīþa (meaning "happy, blithe").
Bloodgood English (American), Dutch (Americanized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Bloetgoet. The progenitor of the American Bloodgood family was Francis Bloodgood, a 17th-century Dutch emigrant to Flushing, Queens, New York, originally named Frans Jansen Bloetgoet.
Bloodsworth English
Variant spelling of Bloodworth.
Bloom English
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
Bloom Swedish
Variant of Blom.
Bloom Jewish (Americanized), Dutch
Americanized spelling of Bloem and Blum.
Bloomfield English
This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational name from either of the two places thus called in England, one in Staffordshire, and the other in Somerset, or it may be a dialectal variant of Blonville (-sur-Mer) in Calvados, Normandy, and hence a Norman habitation name... [more]
Bloomingdale Jewish (Americanized)
Americanized form of German Blumenthal or its Dutch cognate Bloemendaal.
Bloomstrand Swedish (Anglicized)
Possibly an anglicized form of Swedish Blomstrand.
Blough English
Anglo-Saxon form of German “Blauch.” The name means “one who plays a horn.”
Blount English
Variant of Blunt.
Blow English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a pale complexion (from Middle English blowe "pale"). This surname was borne by English composer John Blow (1649-1708) and British fashion editor Isabella Blow (original name Isabella Delves Broughton; 1958-2007); additionally, "Joe Blow" is a name used colloquially (in US, Canadian and Australian English) as representative of the ordinary uncomplicated unsophisticated man, the average man in the street (of which the equivalent in British English is "Joe Bloggs").
Blueberry English
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
Bluemel German
Diminutive of the Middle High German bluome meaning "flower." The name is believed to be an occupational name.
Bluestein German
The surname Bluestein is an Anglicized surname and translates as blue stone.
Bluford English, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
Bluhm German
German alternate spelling of the Italian surname, Blum meaning flower.
Blumbarg Yiddish
It literally means "bloom barrow".
Blume German, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
Blumenberg Jewish
Ornamental name composed of German Blume "flower" and Berg "mountain, hill".
Blumenkrantz German, Jewish
Means "flower-wreath" in German.
Blumenschein German
from Middle High German bluomenschin "flower splendor" from the elements bluomo "bloom" and sconi "beautiful" probably a topographic or habitational name referring to a house distinguished by a sign depicting a bunch of flowers or decorated with flower designs or noted for its flower garden.
Blumreisinger German (Anglicized)
Meaning "flower raiser". See also Blum.
Blumshteyn Yiddish
Original Yiddish form of Blumstein.
Blunden English
From Middle English blund "blond".
Blunt English
Nickname for a person with fair hair or a light complexion from Old French blunt meaning "blond". It was also used as a nickname for a stupid person from Middle English blunt or blont meaning "dull".
Bluth German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name from Middle High German bluot, German Blüte ‘bloom’, ‘flower head’. ... [more]
Blydenburgh Flemish
Derived from a habitational name from Blijenberg (formerly Bleidenberg) in Brabant, Belgium. (Also Van Blydenbergh)
Blyth English
Variant of Blythe
Blythin Welsh
Recorded as Blethin, Bleythin, Bleything, Blythin, and others, this is a surname which has Welsh royal connections. It derives from the Ancient British personal name "Bleddyn," translating as the son of Little Wolf... [more]
Blyzynskyi Ukrainian
Derived from Ukrainian blyznyuky "twin".
Bo Italian
Variant of Bove.
Norwegian
Variant of Bøe. A notable bearer is Norwegian biathlete Tarjei Bø (b. 1988).
Boakye Akan
Meaning unknown.
Boase Indian
Variant of Bose.
Boateng Western African, Akan
Means "someone who is humble to God" in Akan. This is among the most common surnames in Ghana. Famous bearers include half-brothers Jérôme (1988-) and Kevin-Prince Boateng (1987-), both of whom are German soccer players.
Boatfield English
Occupational name for a person who worked on the deck of a ship.
Bob French
From the given name Bob.
Boban Croatian
Habitational name, originates from Bobanova Draga, a village in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Bobber English
From the ancient Anglo-Saxon name Baber, a town in the county of Suffolk. A famous bearer of the last name is actor, director, animator, voice actor, and musician Troy Bobber.
Bobe English
Derived from the nickname Boebel
Bobeck Swedish, German, Jewish, Slavic
A respelling of the Swedish Bobäck, an ornamental name composed of the elements bo meaning "farm" and bäck meaning "stream".... [more]
Bobiński Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Bobin or Bobino.
Boboev Tajik
Tajik form of Babaev.
Bobola Polish
From a derivative of bób meaning 'bean'.
Boboyev Uzbek
Uzbek form of Babaev.
Bobrov Russian
Patronymic surname derived from Russian бобр (bobr) or бобёр (bobyor) both meaning "beaver".
Bobrownik Polish
From bobrownik, meaning "beaver hunter" or "beaver breeder."
Bobrowski Polish, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Bobrowa, Bobrowo, Bobrowce, or Bobrowiec.
Bóbski Polish
Possibly derived from the Polish word bób, which means "broad bean".
Bocanegra Spanish
Spanish: nickname from boca ‘mouth’ + negra ‘black’, denoting a foul-mouthed or abusive person. In the form Boccanegra, this surname has also been long established in Italy.
Bocboc Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano bukbok meaning "clobber, maul" or "woodboring insect, weevil".