Submitted Surnames Starting with B

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Bara Czech
Comes from a reduced vernacular form of the Latin personal name Bartolomaeus, Polish, Bartlomiej, Czech Bartolomej, or possibly from a pet form of the personal name Barbara.
Barack Arabic
From the given name Barack
Barad Biblical Hebrew (Rare)
It's the Hebrew name of one the biblical plagues in the Hebrew bible that God cast on Egypt. It means Hail as in the Ice storm.
Baraga Slovene
A Slovene surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was Slovene-American Roman Catholic bishop Frederic Baraga (1797-1868), who was the bishop of Marquette, a town in Upper Michigan, USA. There is also a village in Upper Michigan named Baraga, which was named after the bishop.
Barajas Basque
Spanish and Moor
Barakat Arabic
Derived from the given name Barakat.
Baraki Ethiopian, Amharic
From the given name Baraki, meaning "one who blesses" in Amharic. It is possibly related to Arabic Barak 2 and Hebrew Baruch, also meaning "blessed".
Barakzai Pashto
Means "son of Barak 2" in Pashto.
Baran Persian, Turkish, Kurdish, Azerbaijani
From the given name Baran.
Baránek Czech, Slovak
Baránek means "small wether" in Czech (Moravian) and Slovak.
Baranov Russian
From baran, meaning "ram".
Barasch Hebrew
Acronym of the first two letters for the Hebrew phrase "son of the Rabbi Samuel." Bar Rabbi Schmul
Barbăneagră Romanian
It literally means "black beard".
Barbarossa Italian
Means "red beard" in Italian.
Barbe French
Nickname for someone with a beard, Old French barbe (Latin barba).
Barbe French
From the given name Barbe.
Barbe German
From Middle High German barbe, the name of a species of fish resembling the carp; hence by metonymy an occupational name for a fisherman or fish dealer, or possibly a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way.
Barbeau French
Derived from barbeau meaning "barbel", a type of fish, hence a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman, or a nickname for a man with a sparse beard, the fish being distinguished by beardlike growths on either side of its mouth... [more]
Barbera Italian
Derogatory nickname from barbera ‘barber’s wife’, a term also used to denote a prostitute or dishonest woman. Catalan (Barberà): habitational name from a place in Tarragona province, named with Late Latin Barbarianum ‘place of Barbarius’, a derivative of Barbarus (see Barbaro)... [more]
Barbero Spanish
Spanish occupational name for a barber-surgeon (see Barber), Spanish barbero, from Late Latin barbarius, a derivative of barba ‘beard’ (Latin barba).
Barbin French
Diminutive of Barbe.
Barbon French (Quebec)
Derived from the nickname barbon meaning "old codger" as well as referring to a "confirmed bachelor".
Barbosa Portuguese
denoting a person who lived by land that contained overgrown leafy vegetation from the portuguese word barba "leaf" + oso/osa (adjective suffix); variant of Barboza
Barbour English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Occupational name for a barber, one who cuts hair for a living.
Barbu Romanian
Means "bushy-bearded."
Barceló Catalan
Apparently from a personal name Barcelonus (feminine Barcelona), originally denoting someone from the city of Barcelona.
Barcelona Catalan, Spanish
Habitational name from Barcelona, the principal city of Catalonia. The place name is of uncertain, certainly pre-Roman, origin. The settlement was established by the Carthaginians, and according to tradition it was named for the Carthaginian ruling house of Barca; the Latin form was Barcino or Barcilo.
Bárcenas Spanish
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of the Castilian municipality of Espinosa de los Monteros.
Barcho Circassian
Possibly derived from an Adyghe word meaning "band, lace", referring to someone who made ropes or binding tapes, or from a Chechen word referring to a tailor.
Barclay Scottish, English
Habitational name of English origin, from Berkeley in Gloucestershire, named in Old English with be(o)rc "birch" and lēah "woodland clearing".
Barcroft English
English habitational name from for example Barcroft in Haworth, West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bere (barley) and croft (smallholding).
Bardell English
Originally meant "person from Bardwell", Suffolk ("Bearda's spring"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Bardell, Mr Pickwick's widowed landlady in Charles Dickens's 'Pickwick Papers' (1837), who misconstrues an innocent remark about having a companion as a marriage proposal, which leads to her suing Pickwick for breach of promise.
Barden English
English: habitational name from places in North and West Yorkshire named Barden, from Old English bere ‘barley’ (or the derived adjective beren) + denu ‘valley’.
Bardhi Albanian
Meaning "White"
Bårdsen Norwegian
Means "son of Bård".
Barefoot English
English: nickname for someone who was in the habit of going about his business unshod, from Old English bær ‘bare’, ‘naked’ + fot ‘foot’. It may have referred to a peasant unable to afford even the simplest type of footwear, or to someone who went barefoot as a religious penance.In some instances, probably a translation of German Barfuss, the northern form Barfoth, or the Danish cognate Barfo(e)d.
Bärg German
Variant of Berg.
Bar Gil Hebrew (Modern)
Combination of Bar and Gil, with the meaning of "son of Gil" or "one who is joyful".
Bargy Anglo-Saxon
The surname Bargy was first found in Gloucestershire, where they held a family seat from ancient times.
Bar Haim Hebrew
Combination of Bar and Haim, with the meaning of "son of Chayyim".
Barham English
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, are named with Old English beorg ‘hill’ + ham ‘homestead’. The one in Kent, however, is from an unattested Old English byname Biora, Beora (a derivative of bera ‘bear’) + ham.
Baril French
During the middle ages, when people were named after their given job, Baril was what winemakers and brewers were named. Baril simply means "Barrel" or "Keg"
Barinov Russian
Means "son of the boyar" from Russian барин (barin) meaning "boyar, nobleman".
Barišić Croatian
Means ''son of Bariša''.
Barisich German
Likely a German version of Baruch.
Barjaktarović Montenegrin
Derived from barjaktar (барјактар), meaning "flag bearer, standard bearer".
Bark Swedish
Perhaps derived from a place name containing either Old Swedish *barke "throat", Old Swedish biork "birch tree" or Swedish bark "bark (covering of the trunk of a tree)"
Barkai Hebrew
Means ''morning star'' in Hebrew.
Barker English
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
Barkis English
Meant "person who works in a tannery" (from Middle English barkhous "tannery" - bark was used in the tanning process). A fictional bearer is Barkis, a carrier in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849) who sends a message via David to Clara Peggotty that "Barkis is willin'" (i.e. to marry her).
Barkus English
Probably a reduced form of Barkhouse, a topographic name for someone who lived by a tannery, Middle English barkhous, or an occupational name for someone who worked in one.
Bar Lev Hebrew
Combination of the surnames Bar and Lev.
Barman Indian, Bengali, Assamese
Derived from Sanskrit वर्मा (varman) meaning "armour, shield, protection".
Barnabi American (Rare)
Possibly from a variant of the given name Barnaby.
Barnaby English
Either (i) means "person from Barnaby", Yorkshire ("Beornwald's settlement"); or (ii) from the medieval male personal name Barnaby, the English form of Barnabas, a biblical name ultimately from Aramaic Barnabia "son of Nabia".
Barnal English
Variant of Bernal.
Barner Low German
North German derivative of the old Germanic personal name Barnher or Bernher (see Berner).
Barner English
Southern English habitational name for someone who lived by a barn.
Barnette English, French (?)
Variant of Bernet and perhaps also a variant of English Barnett, under French influence.
Barnewall Anglo-Norman, Irish
A locational surname given to those who lived by a stream in either Cambridgeshire, which derives its name from the Olde English beorna meaning "warrior" and wella meaning "stream", or from one in Northamptonshire, which got its name from the Olde English byrge meaning "burial mound" and well, which also means "stream." a burial mound and 'well(a)'... [more]
Barney English
It probably came from the given name Barney, if nothing else.
Barno Italian, Ukrainian, French, Ancient Aramaic, Russian
The surname Barno was first found in the north of Italy, especially in Tuscany. The name occasionally appears in the south, usually in forms which end in "o," but the northern forms ending in "i" are much more common... [more]
Baron English, French
From a title of nobility derived from Old French baron of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly from Frankish barō meaning "servant, man, warrior". It was used as a nickname for someone who worked for a baron or for a peasant with ideas above their station.
Baron Jewish
From German or Polish baron or Russian барон (baron) meaning "baron". In Israel the name is often interpreted to mean "son of strength" from Hebrew בר און‎ (bar on).
Baroni Italian
Variant of Barone.
Barons Latvian
Means "baron".
Barq English
Ever drank Barq's root beer?
Barr Scottish, Northern Irish
Habitational name from any of various places in southwestern Scotland, in particular Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, named with Gaelic barr "height, hill" or a British cognate of this.
Barrach Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic spelling of Dunbar.
Barreau French
Possibly a variant of Barreur, an agent derivative of barrer ‘to bar’, ‘to close or block off’, hence possibly an occupational name for a jailer or doorkeeper.
Barreira Portuguese, Galician
From several habitations in Galicia and Portugal, from barreira meaning "clay or loam hollow".
Barrenetxe Basque
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of the municipality of Larrabetzu.
Barrera Spanish, Catalan
Either a topographic name for someone who lived near a gate or fence, from Spanish and Catalan barrera meaning "barrier", or a topographic name for someone who lived by a clay pit, from Spanish barrero, derived from the Spanish word barro meaning "mud, clay".
Barrick English
Variation of Barwick.
Barriere French
Occupational name for a gatekeeper, from Old French barier.
Barrineau French
The history of the Barrineau family goes back to the Medieval landscape of northern France, to that coastal region known as Normandy. Barrineau is a habitation name, derived from the place name Barrault, in Normandy.... [more]
Barrington English, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
Barrios Spanish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Spanish barrio "outlying suburb (especially an impoverished one), slum", from Arabic barr "suburb, dependent village". It may also be a topographic name for someone originating from a barrio.
Barroeta Basque
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of the municipality of Bedia.
Barron English
Variant of Baron.
Barrow English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Old English bearo, bearu "grove" or from Barrow in Furness, Cumbria, which is named with an unattested Celtic word, barr, here meaning "promontory", and Old Norse ey "island"... [more]
Barrowman English
A man employed in wheeling a barrow; specifically, in coal-mining, one who conveys the coal in a wheelbarrow from the point where it is mined to the trolleyway or tramway on which it is carried to the place where it is raised to the surface.
Barrundia Basque
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
Barry African
A Guinean surname meaning the family comes from the Peul, Fulani, or Foulbe ethnic groups of West Africa.
Barry Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Beargha meaning, 'descendant of Beargh.'
Barseghyan Armenian
Means "son of Barsegh".
Bar Shaul Hebrew
Combination of Bar and Shaul, with the meaning of "son of Saul".
Barsi Hungarian
Name for someone living in a village named Bars. This was the surname of American child actress Judith Barsi (June 6, 1978 - July 25, 1988).
Barskiy Ukrainian
Means "of Bar", referring to the city of Bar in the Vínnitsya Oblast.
Barszcz Polish
Nickname from barszcz "beetroot soup".
Bartek Polish, Czech, Slovak, German
Polish, Czech, Slovak, and eastern German: from a pet form of a vernacular form of the personal name Bartolomaeus (Czech Bartoloměj, Polish Bartłomiej, German Bartolomäus)
Barthélémy French
From the given name Barthélémy.
Bartholomew English
Derived from the given name BARTHOLOMEW.
Barthorpe English
This surname originates from the village of the same name in the East Riding of Yorkshire, likely combining the Old Norse personal name Bǫrkr with Old Norse þorp meaning "village."
Bartle Scottish
An Anglo-Scottish diminutive of Bart and Barth, derived from the biblical name 'Bartholomew' which means 'He who makes furrows' or a farmer.
Bartlett English
From the Middle English personal name Bartelot, a pet form of Bartholomew.
Bartley English, American
1. English: habitational name from Bartley in Hampshire, or from Bartley Green in the West Midlands, both of which are named with Old English be(o)rc ‘birch’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’; compare Barclay... [more]
Bartman English
Last name Bartman is very rare but I believe it’s a English last name .Possibly variant of the last name BAUMAN
Bartochowski Polish
This indicates familial origin with the village of Bartochów.
Bartoli Italian
Derived from the Italian name Bartolo.
Bartolotta Italian
Bartolotta was the name taken by the followers of Saint Bartholomew. Bartholomew was one of the 12 apostles of Jesus. He is credited as bringing Christianity to Armenia in the 1st century.
Baruti Albanian
barut means gunpowder in Albanian
Barwick English, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
Bar Yosef Hebrew
Combination of Bar and Yosef, with the meaning of "son of Joseph".
Barzanî Kurdish
Denoted a person from the village of Barzan in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq.
Barzegar Persian
Means "farmer" in Persian.
Barzelai Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai.
Barzelaij Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzelay. Also compare Barzilaij... [more]
Barzelay Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai via Barzelai. A known bearer of this surname is American-Israeli musician Eef Barzelay (b... [more]
Barzilai Jewish
From the given name Barzillai.
Barzilaij Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzilay. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 112 bearers in 1947 and only 51 bearers in 2007.
Barzilay Hebrew
Variant form of Barzilai.
Bar Zohar Hebrew
Combination of the surnames Bar and Zohar.
Basa Tagalog, Filipino
Very prominent name in Manila, the Philippines.
Basarabić Vlach
From Basarabia. Basarabia is land of origin Vlach
Basarrate Basque
It indicates familial origin within the eponymous area of the district of Santutxu in the city of Bilbao.
Bascöurt French
The Bascourt or Bascur surname is from France, from that place dates the beginning of the surname, however the French of previous centuries had no records of that surname. ... [more]
Basheer Arabic, Urdu
From the given name Bashir.
Basher Arabic, Bengali, Filipino, Maranao
From the given name Bashir.
Bashimow Turkmen
son of Bashim.
Bashir Arabic, Urdu
From the given name Bashir.
Bashur Kurdish
Kurdish: south -means
Bašić Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from baša, a honorific term for “chief”, “boss”, “head of the family”, etc.
Basiński Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Basin.
Basista Polish, Czech, Slovak
Occupational name for a double-bass player.
Basisty Russian
Derived from Russian басистый (basisty) meaning "having bass, deep voice".
Baskerville English
Means "bush town", from Anglo-Norman French boschet (a little bush) and ville (town).
Baskin Jewish
Means "son of Baske", a Yiddish female personal name (a pet-form of the Biblical name Bath Seba). Baskin-Robbins is a US chain of ice-cream parlours founded in Glendale, California in 1945 by Burt Baskin (1913-1969) and Irv Robbins (1917-2008).
Baskir Turkish (Rare), South American (Rare)
Used by Jewish families that were running away from anti-semites. It's meaning is 'printer' or 'pressures are...'
Basnet Nepali
Meaning uncertain.
Basom English
origin possible of saxon origin
Basra Indian, Punjabi
From the name of a city in present-day Iraq, Basra (البصرة‎).
Bassett English
From Old French bas meaning "short", low". It was either used as a nickname for a short person or someone of humble origins.
Bastiaan Dutch
From the given name Bastiaan.
Bastían Spanish
From the given name Bastían.
Bastian German
From the given name Bastian.
Bastíansdóttir Icelandic
Means "daughter of Bastían" in Icelandic.
Bastíansson Icelandic
Means "son of Bastían" in Icelandic.
Bastiat French
Meaning of this name is unknown. Possibly derived from Sebastian The surname Bastiat was first found in Poitou, where this family held a family seat since ancient times.
Bastidas Spanish
Possibly related to the French word "bastide", referring to fortified towns built in Southern France in the Middle Ages.... [more]
Basu Indian, Bengali
Bengali form of Vasu.
Basumatary Indian, Bodo, Assamese
From a Sanskritized form of the Bodo name बसुमातारी (Baisamatari), which meant "mother earth" or "earthly folks". The name was originally used by landowners or landlords.
Baszowski Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Baszowice.
Batabor Filipino, Maranao
Means "coffeepot, teapot" or "green malong (tube skirt)" in Maranao.
Batawi Indonesian, Arabic
Means "Betawi" in Arabic, referring to an ethnic group native to the city of Jakarta in Indonesia. The name itself is from Batavia, the capital city of the Dutch East Indies (located in present-day Jakarta)... [more]
Batchelor English, Scottish
Status name for a young knight or novice at arms, deriving from Middle English and Old French bacheler (from medieval Latin baccalarius), a word of unknown ultimate origin. The word had already been extended to mean "(young) unmarried man" by the 14th century, but it is unlikely that many bearers of the surname derive from the word in that sense... [more]
Bateman English, Scottish
Occupational name meaning ‘servant of Bartholomew.’
Batey English (?)
Originates from mostly northern England. Is the presumed given name to fishers. (With it meaning "Small fishing boat" in old English.)
Bathgate Scottish, English
From the town of Bathgate, west of Edinburgh, Scotland. The town's name derives from Cumbric *beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and *gaith. meaning 'wood' (Welsh coed).
Batista Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese cognate of Bautista as well as a Spanish variant.
Batlokwa Tswana, Southern African
a branch of the Bakgatla section of the Bantu speaking communities which originated from the Great Lakes and Northern Central Africa. Batlokwa are said to have been a breakaway branch of the Bakgatla which is another Bahurutse section of the Tswana people.
Batobalani Filipino, Cebuano, Hiligaynon
Means "lodestone, magnet" in Cebuano and Hiligaynon.
Batra Indian, Hindi, Punjabi
Of uncertain meaning.
Batres Spanish
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous Manchego municipality.
Batta Indian
Hindu name of unknown meaning, based on the name of a subgroup among the Tank goldsmiths of Panjab.
Battistella Italian
From St. John the Baptist, the first bearers of this name were devoted to this saint. Another etymology would be a patronymic from the given name Battista, anyway linked to the aforementioned saint.
Battye English (British)
A surname common in parts of Yorkshire. Meaning unknown.
Batubara Batak
Means "coal" in Batak.
Batungbakal Filipino
Tagalog Filipino surname meaning "iron stone", from Tagalog bato "stone" combined with bakal "iron, steel".
Baucom English
Variant spelling of BALCOMBE, a habitational name from West Sussex derived from Old English bealu "evil" and cumb "valley".
Baudelaire French
A French surname, coming from the word "baudelaire", which is a short, broad, and curved sword used in heraldry.
Baudric French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudric, which was a variant form of Baldéric, the French form of Baldric.
Baudry French
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudry, which was a variant form of Baudric, a given name that itself was a variant form of Baldéric (see Baldric)... [more]
Bauerdick German
A surname originating from the Rhineland region of Germany. It is derived from German Bauer (Bur in the locals dialects) "farmer" and Deich (Diek and Dick in the local dialects) "levee" or Teich "pond"... [more]
Bauersack German
Semi-Germanized form of the Polish surname Burczak, originally derived from Polish burczec "growl; shout".... [more]
Baugher German
Means peasant farmer in German.
Baumeister German
Occupational name for a "builder" in German; from Middle High German 'buwen' 'to build' + meister 'master'.... [more]
Baumfree Dutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
Baumkötter German (Modern)
From the German words 'Baum' meaning 'tree' and 'Kötter' a type of villager who dwelt in a cottage, similar to the Scottish Cotter. "Presumably a 'Baumkötter' earned money from a small orchard on their property."
Bauzon Filipino
Meaning unknown, of Hokkien origin.
Bava Indian
Variant of Bawa.
Bavaro Italian
Ethnic name from bavaro "Bavarian" someone from Bavaria, now part of Germany, but formerly an independent kingdom.
Baviera Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan
Means "Bavaria" in Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Catalan. Indicating for someone from Bavaria a state in Germany.
Bawa Punjabi
Sikh name based on the name of a Jat clan. It is also a title given to the male descendants of the first three Sikh gurus.
Bax English
Possibly a short form of Baxter, or maybe from the Anglo-Saxon word box, referring to the box tree.
Baxendale English
Habitational name, probably an altered form of Baxenden, a place near Accrington, which is named with an unattested Old English word bæcstān meaning "bakestone" (a flat stone on which bread was baked) + denu meaning "valley"... [more]
Baxley English
Variant of Bexley.
Bay English
From the Middle English given name Baye.
Bay English, French, Dutch
Derived from Middle English and Old French bay, bai and Middle Dutch bay, all meaning "reddish brown". It was originally a nickname for someone with a hair color similar to that.
Bay Scottish
Reduced form of McBeth.
Bay German
From the given name Baio.
Bay Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Likely a reduced form of German Bayer.
Bayabao Filipino, Maranao
From Maranao Bayabaw, the term used to refer to traditional subdivisions of the eastern regions of Lanao.
Bayers German
Variant of Bayer.
Baygents Anglo-Saxon
The earliest recorded spelling of the surname was "Besant", "Bezant", or "Beasant", which comes from an old French word "besant", which, in turn, was derived from the Latin term "byzantius aureus". The "byzantius" or "bezant" was a gold coin named after the city of Byzantium (ancient name in BC, later named 'Constantinople' in 330 AD)... [more]
Baykalov Russian
Derived from the name of Lake Baikal, derived from Turkish baiköl meaning "rich lake".
Bayley English
Variant of Bailey.
Baylis English
Derived from the Middle English 'bail(l)i', a development of the Old French 'baillis'. In Scotland the word survives as 'bailie', the title of a chief magistrate for a part of a county or barony. The word survives in England as 'bailiff', an officer who serves writs and summonses for the court.
Baylon Spanish
Spanish: variant of Bailón ( see Bailon ).
Baylor English
Possibly derived from the legal term bailor "one who delivers goods". It could also be a respelling of German name BEILER, an occupational name for an inspector of measures or a maker of measuring sticks... [more]
Bayrak Turkish
Means "flag" in Turkish.
Bayramov Azerbaijani
Means "son of Bayram".